Eagle Valley Enterprise
Vail, CO Colorado

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November 18, 2012
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Driver cut off from driving

Editor's note: The following excerpts were taken from Eagle County law enforcement officers and police reports.

A deputy allegedly saw a car cut off traffic in the opposite lane as it turned left off U.S. Highway 6 in Edwards on Oct. 25.

The officer stopped the car and contacted the driver. The 24-year-old man said he didn't have a license because of two alcohol convictions. He said if the deputy let him go with a warning, then he would park and leave the car in a rest area nearby.

The man was arrested for driving without a license and failing to yield right of way when turning left.

Strange theft

An employee with the Colorado Division of Water Resources reported that electronic equipment at a water-gauging station in a remote part of Eagle County was stolen around Oct. 15. The equipment transmits data to the Internet and stopped transmitting on that date. The equipment was confirmed missing Oct. 17.

The employee said the equipment couldn't be used by other people, so it was odd that it would be stolen and that someone would go to so much effort to steal it. Not only was it in a very remote location, bolts and a lock were undone, but the device had to be lifted out of a vertically-oriented culvert.

Trash can fire

A woman saw flames in a trash can at an Edwards bus stop as she drove by Oct. 31. She called 911. Firefighters and deputies responded and put it out. The cause appeared to be a smoldering cigarette.

Driving too slow with marijuana in the car

A deputy stopped a car for allegedly driving 60 mph in a 75 mph zone in the left lane of Interstate 70 near Edwards on Nov. 1.

The 21-year-old driver was shaking and seemed nervous. She said she'd never been pulled over before and started to cry, but no tears came. The deputy suspected she was faking and asked why she was crying. The woman said she wasn't crying, she was just nervous. Then she admitted she had been arrested over the summer.

The officer reported that he smelled unburned marijuana during the interaction and asked about that as well. The woman denied having any at first, then said she had a resonated pipe, police said. The deputy said she distinctly smelled unburned marijuana and asked to search the car. The woman said she had some in her bag, police said, and a search turned up a pipe and two containers of marijuana totaling less than an ounce.

The woman was cited for failing to drive in a designated lane, possession of less than an ounce of marijuana and possession of marijuana paraphernalia.

Parking violator escapes with towing company's boot

On Nov. 2, the employee of a towing company hired to enforce parking regulations at an Eagle-Vail apartment complex said a boot was stolen Nov. 1.

A boot locks around a tire to prevent a car from being moved until a fine is paid to take it off. The tow company employee said the only other way to get a boot off is to remove the tire.

He said he booted a truck on Nov. 1 and took a picture for documentation. Later that day, the truck and the boot were gone.

A deputy tracked down the suspect with license plate information found in the photo. The man returned the officers call Nov. 3 and said he removed his truck tire and used his spare to drive away. He said he got the cash together, paid the fine and returned the boot that day. The towing company confirmed the matter was settled.

Miscellaneous mischief

• A white Chevy pickup allegedly drove away from a Gypsum gas station without paying for $97 of fuel on Nov. 1.

• An unlocked bike was stolen from outside an Edwards business Nov. 2. The black mountain bike had "High Speed" on the frame in white letters. The bike's value was about $150.

• A Dotsero resident had to replace the engine of his truck after someone dumped sugar into the gas tank last month. The new engine cost about $7,000.


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The VailDaily Updated Nov 18, 2012 09:10PM Published Nov 18, 2012 09:09PM Copyright 2012 The VailDaily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.