‘Elemental’ film screens twice in March | VailDaily.com

‘Elemental’ film screens twice in March

“Elemental,” this month’s sustainable film presented my Walking Mountains Science Center, looks at the Earth’s most pressing ecological dilemmas and follows the battles of three people facing seemingly impossible tasks. These individuals have created incredible ripples from their local efforts turned global.

“Elemental,” this month’s sustainable film presented my Walking Mountains Science Center, looks at the Earth’s most pressing ecological dilemmas and follows the battles of three people facing seemingly impossible tasks. These individuals have created incredible ripples from their local efforts turned global.

if you go …

What: “Elemental” — part of the Sustainable Community Film Series.

When/Where: 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday at Loaded Joe’s, Avon; 6:30 p.m. on March 18 at The Dusty Boot, Eagle.

Cost: $5 suggested donation.

More information: Visit http://www.walkingmountains.org/films, and for more information about this film, visit http://www.elementalthemovie.org.

AVON — Global warming, clean water, finite energy — these are the issues of our time. These are the things we look at and think, “I’m just one person, what can I possibly do to make a difference?”

“Elemental,” this month’s sustainable film presented my Walking Mountains Science Center, looks at the Earth’s most pressing ecological dilemmas and follows the battles of three people facing seemingly impossible tasks. These individuals have created incredible ripples from their local efforts turned global.

Rajendra Singh is a government official in India who embarks on a pilgrimage down the Ganges River. He challenges people to take action to clean up their sacred river that accounts for 60 percent of India’s drinking water.

A Chipewyan activist in Alberta, Canada, singlehandedly rallies a community to raise their voices in opposition of the Keystone Pipeline proposed to transport crude oil from the Tar Sands. This is the world’s largest industrial development and is threatening Canada’s pristine ecosystems as well as its indigenous people.

Bio-mimicry is the passion of Jay Harman, an Australian inventor, who has used nature’s blueprint to create a device that could potentially slow down global climate change. Jay’s motto: “All of our knowledge as humans comes from nature because we are a part of nature.”

Through these people’s struggles and successes during the film, we are left charged to think about what we are all passionate about as individuals and fight for it. As Margaret Mead so famously said: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

To view the entire line-up of the series, visit http://www.walkingmountains.org/films and for more information about this film, visit http://www.elementalthemovie.org.