Compiled by Pam Boyd

Those were the days

5 years ago

Week of Oct. 30, 2008

The Eagle Valley Enterprise marked its 110th anniversary. As part of the celebratory edition, the paper named the Top 10 newsmakers of the past 110 years. The list included Jim Sherbondy and Delmar Spooner, two men convicted of killing Eagle County lawmen in separate crimes that happened 24 years apart. Both murder stories involved massive manhunts. Other top newsmakers included Fred Kummer of Adam’s Rib and favorite son and famed professional jockey Pat Day.

Randy Milhoan of the Eagle County Republicans reported that campaign signs valued at $1,000 had gone missing from locations around Eagle.

Eagle Police Chief Rodger McLaughlin launched a Neighborhood Information Network. Citizens were invited to sign up for the service, which offered email alerts about criminal activity or safety warnings.

Eagle’s newest restaurant — The Dusty Boot — opened its signature new building at Eagle Ranch.

10 years ago

Week of Oct. 30, 2003

A white supremacist group littered the town with several hundred flyers. Resident Lena Yost had the following to say about the group’s actions, “I just dumped the flyer in the garbage. It’s a terrible thing. I guess there are just a lot of ding-dongs in this world.”

A 26-year-old McCoy man, Steven James Ball, pleaded guilty to arson, cruelty to animals and false reporting in connection with a fire that destroyed a mobile home along Catamount Creek Road. Seven cats died in the fire. Additional, Ball pleaded guilty to shooting two family dogs.

The United Methodist Women noodle-making crew of Ella Bindley, Doris Andrews, Julia Rhodes, Berniece White, Barbara Meese and Ruth Lenz converged to prepare for the church’s annual fund-raiser.

Crews from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management worked with homeowners from Eby Creek Mesa to thin trees and brush from public land around the subdivision in an effort to minimize wildfire risks.

20 years ago

Week of Oct. 28, 1993

The Eagle Town Board approved a 197-unit North Bank subdivision (now the Eagle Villas project).

An Eagle County master plan meeting in Edwards drew a huge crowd.

The county approved a new regional firing range, exclusively for use by law officers. The facility was planned north of Wolcott.

Debate over a proposed county half-cent sales tax dedicated to transportation was becoming heated.

Linda Carter of the Eagle County Extension Office was honored as the outstanding field secretary during a statewide conference.

Tim Bishop led an outstanding EVHS Devils football offense in a game against Aspen. Also contributing to the win were Phil Cantrell, Rick Rogers, Brad Hollandsworth, Alan Biglow, Nick O’Neil, Zac Stratton, Case Sanders, Mike Pietrack and Kent Gledhill.

30 years ago

Week of Nov. 3, 1983

Fifty angry lower valley residents turned out to protest a U.S. Forest Service proposal to close 20 to 30 percent of the roads in the White River National Forest.

A fantastic, one-hand catch by tight end Nathan Bryant and fine running by Bob Ross helped quarterback John Harris turn a play into six points. Still, the Devils lost to the West Grand Mustangs.

A Colorado Division of Wildlife check station pulled in 21 game-law violators. The officers also wrote more than 100 warnings.

Congressman Ray Kogosvek of Colorado’s Third District protested a decision by the Federal Aviation Administration to pull the Eagle County Airport flight service station and replace it with an automated facility.

Local USFS employee Bob Kapushion was among the firefighters who responded to a 10-acre wildfire at Glenwood Canyon.

40 years ago

Week of No. 1, 1973

Gene Slaughter shot a 400-pound bear at Fitzpatrick Gulch on Cottonwood Pass.

Three prisoners escaped from the Eagle County Jail. The men used a rope woven from their blankets to pull a hacksaw — provided by some friends on the ground — into their cell. They then cut a hole in the wall and cut the bars from the window. One man broke his foot when he jumped out of the third-story jail.

Officers Bob Brown and Bill Heyer joined the Eagle Police staff.

Eagle County agreed to purchase the old Eagle Elementary School property on Broadway. The purchase price was $150,000.

Devil players who were instrumental in a 74-0 win over Grand Valley included Eddie Oyler, Dave Rose, Marlon Nottingham, Tom Foral, Dave Schiessl, Miles Collett, Ken McGinnis and Alan Brock.

Elisabeth Gerard, Judy Qualls, Sandy Bower, Nada Stovall and Nettie Reynolds, members of the Gypsum Fire Gals, organized a town Halloween party.

The new Reuben’s Restaurant offered a Sunday dinner special featuring turkey and dressing or beef stroganoff for $2.25.

Stan Knupp joined the U.S. Army and was enrolled in basic training at Fort Polk, La.

50 years ago

Week of Oct. 31, 1963

A four-day search failed to turn up a 24-year-old Westminster man who was reported missing from a hunting camp along Gore Creek.

Miss Melita Wilson and Mrs. George Chandler were selling season tickets to the community concert series.

The Eagle Valley, Riverside and Roaring Fork football teams were tied for first place in the Colorado River League.

The highlight of the annual 4-H Achievement Day program was a presentation by the Camp Tobin delegates Donna Eichler, Jane Nottingham, Erwin Grange and Ron Dodo.

Edward J. Schultz, a radioman for the Navy, was stationed on board the USS Biddle, a guided missile destroyer. In other service news, Army Captain Lawrence R. Peate of Wolcott was participating in exercise “Left Hook,” an armored maneuver at Fort Hood, Texas.

60 years ago

Week of Oct. 29, 1953

Enterprise editor Marilla McCain reported that Eagle had been beset by the flu bug.

The U.S. Army announced that Camp Hale troops would be practicing maneuvers for several months, but would not be using live ammunition.

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Strubi returned to their ranch at Burns after a visit to their native Switzerland.

A heavy snow fell the day before hunting season, stranding an estimated 100 hunters on the Flat Tops with snow depths of up to 3.5 feet. Eagle residents Dr. L.W. Simmons and the Rev. Delbert Paulson each shot huge bucks.

Mr. and Mrs. Pat Bratton and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gates of Burns were in Denver shipping cattle.

The bunk house on the Edge Place along Cabin Creek burned down. The structure was owned by Harry Benton.

The Jodries of the 7W Ranch at Sweetwater were the proud parents of a son, John Merrow, born Oct. 25 and weighing in at 5 pounds, 3 ounces.

Harold Helms was working at a uranium mine near Moab, Utah.

70 years ago

Week of Oct. 29, 1943

A car belonging to local doctor C.M. Parkinson was recovered in Wyoming after it was stolen by three convicts who escaped from the Wyoming State Prison. The doctor’s surgical tools, which were inside the car, were still missing.

The Eagle County Chapter of the Red Cross, under the direction of Mrs. Ben White, was filling kit bags for servicemen.

A Minturn man, Lyle Penfeld, was reported as missing in action on one of the World War II battlefields.

C.G. Rice was heading the county War Chest drive. Eagle County’s quota was $3,000.

A truck driver who crashed his vehicle on Battle Mountain while hauling freight, was arrested. He was charged with embezzling money from the trucking company and stealing the vehicle.

Sgt. Mickey Walsh, a Red Cliff man, reported he visited a sailor friend’s ship where he enjoyed his first steak and pork chop dinners since leaving the United States.

Lloyd’s Red Mountain Ranch was selling 40 head of registered bulls and 20 head of registered heifers at an auction in Grand Junction.

80 years ago

Week of Nov. 3, 1933

Ed Slaughter of Gypsum offered the “Cliff Dweller” — a columnist for the Enterprise — a tour of his Gypsum Creek Valley home. The property was homesteaded in 1883.

The Ted Lea Ranch on Alkali Creek, was producing Red McClure potatoes that were as big as 2 pounds.

The Eagle High School and Eagle Grade School placed first in a nine-school music contest. Josephine Meehan and Laurene Grant won top prize for a piano duet and Ellen Bindley earned top honors for a piano solo.

Eagle County Assessor N.E. Buchholz reported the county’s total property valuation was $5.8 million. (For comparison, the county’s current total valuation is more than $3 billion.)


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The VailDaily Updated Oct 30, 2013 11:30AM Published Oct 30, 2013 11:30AM Copyright 2013 The VailDaily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.