Remote highway avalanche control gets review | VailDaily.com

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Remote highway avalanche control gets review

Rrok Prelaj, a truck driver for FedEx, keeps himself busy as he waits on I-70 near exit 259  in Morrison, Colo. A winter weather storm has closed major highways, knocked out power to thousands of customers and raised avalanche dangers across Colorado. Parts of Interstate 25 that runs north and south near of Denver are closed, along with portions of Interstate 70 west of the Front Range following a slew of traffic accidents that kept authorities and snowplows busy.  (AP Photo/The Denver Post, RJ Sangosti)  MAGS OUT; TV OUT

Rrok Prelaj, a truck driver for FedEx, keeps himself busy as he waits on I-70 near exit 259 in Morrison, Colo. A winter weather storm has closed major highways, knocked out power to thousands of customers and raised avalanche dangers across Colorado. Parts of Interstate 25 that runs north and south near of Denver are closed, along with portions of Interstate 70 west of the Front Range following a slew of traffic accidents that kept authorities and snowplows busy. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, RJ Sangosti) MAGS OUT; TV OUT

EMPIRE, Colo. (AP) – Colorado transportation officials are considering using remote control to reduce avalanche danger to drivers instead of using artillery shells on mountain roads.

Transportation engineer Peter Kozinski says Europeans are using a remote controlled system that uses an oxygen-propane mix to force an explosion in the snow pack.

According to KCNC-TV, the department is now trying to find money to pay for the program. One proposal would create a partnership with mountain communities.

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