DAN ELLIOTT
Associated Press

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October 2, 2013
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Chaffee County trail closed at least until spring after slide

DENVER — A popular Colorado trail where a rock slide killed five members of the same family will remain closed at least until spring, the U.S. Forest Service said Wednesday.

Forest Service experts will have to inspect the site to see if it is feasible and safe to rebuild the trail after it was buried by boulders on Monday, said John Peterson, deputy supervisor for the San Isabel National Forest, which manages the trail.

The inspection won’t happen until after the coming winter, Peterson said.

The slide killed a couple from the nearby town of Buena Vista, one of their daughters and two of their nephews from Missouri. Another daughter survived with a broken leg after her father shielded her.

The Chaffee County Sheriff’s Department identified the dead as Dwayne Johnson, 46, Dawna Johnson, 45, and their 18-year-old daughter, Kiowa-Rain Johnson.

The other victims were identified as Baigen Walker, 10, and Paris Walkup, 22, both of Birch Tree, Mo. They were nephews of Dwayne and Dawna Johnson.

Gracie Johnson, 13, told rescuers her father jumped on top of her when boulders began to crash down around them. Deputy Nick Tolsma, one of the first rescuers on the scene, said Dwayne Johnson probably saved his daughter’s life.

Gracie was being treated at The Children’s Hospital in suburban Denver. The hospital said the girl and her family were grateful for the public’s concern but had no other comment. The hospital said it could not release any information about her condition.

A memorial service for the Johnsons was set for Saturday in Buena Vista. Separate services were being organized for the nephews in Missouri.

The short, scenic trail to Agnes Vaille Falls is a local favorite, but Undersheriff John Spezze has said it should be closed permanently because of the rock slide danger. Spezze didn’t immediately return a phone message Wednesday.

Peterson said the Forest Service will consult with the sheriff’s office and area residents before deciding whether to reopen the trail.

“We’ll look at the site and see if it’s a smart thing,” Peterson said. “Physically, whether we can (reopen it), and geologically, whether we should.” What triggered the slide is still under investigation.

Life-threatening rock slides are rare and difficult to prepare for and protect against, Peterson said.

“It’s such an extreme event, and it’s so uncommon, I don’t know what you do,” he said.


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The VailDaily Updated Oct 2, 2013 03:37PM Published Oct 4, 2013 02:31PM Copyright 2013 The VailDaily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.