Photographer Matt Angiono is showing his nature and action sports images at Art on a Whim Gallery in Vail | VailDaily.com

Photographer Matt Angiono is showing his nature and action sports images at Art on a Whim Gallery in Vail

VAIL — During the GoPro Mountain Games this past year, photographer Matt Angiono trekked straight up Vail Mountain, camera in hand, and was rewarded with a stunning shot of the Gore Range. "There was a sunset rainbow over the range," he remembered. "I hiked up and all of a sudden a huge rainbow appeared. The mountains were all orange. It was really cool." Angiono had his camera set on a time lapse, which means he got a pretty amazing sequence of photos. "You can watch the rainbow form. I was getting rained on while I was taking it. I was covering the camera with my jacket and shirt to keep water off the lens. I was like 'You can't miss this shot.'" That photo, along with plenty of other nature photography as well as action-sports oriented shots, is on display at Art on a Whim gallery on Bridge Street in Vail this weekend. In between shooting events such as slopestyle and freestyle kayaking at this years Games, Angiono will be in the gallery discussing his artwork. This past year, Angiono took the top prize in two of the photography categories in the Mountain Games photography competition with one photo. The photograph features "Sketchy" Andy Lewis as he performs in the Slackline World Championships. It was the first time Angiono had ever photographed slacklining. Lewis is shown mid-air and mid-flip in front of an awe-struck crowd and the Water Tree sculpture in Vail Village. The sun seems to serve as a point of rotation for Lewis as he performs his gravity defying trick. "I like to shoot into the sun, get that back lit shadow effect," said Angiono, who is always hunting for what he calls "epic light." He took the photo using his Go Pro and entered a color version and a black and white version of the same photo in two different categories. "It won best Go Pro action shot and best Go Pro moment," Angiono said. The shot speaks to the focus, determination and daring all needed for athletes to perform at their highest level, on the highest stage. Composing the canopy Angiono has photographed events at the Mountain Games for the past five years, he said, but he's primarily a nature photographer. "I want people to look and have a connection with nature," he said. "That's a big part of my motivation — inspiring people to be outside, enjoy the outdoors, take care of them, all that good stuff." "Buena Vista Aspen Canopy," perhaps Angiono's signature piece to date, was taken while he spent a day lying on his back looking for the perfect combination of composition and light. The piece has the viewer staring straight up into a golden canopy of aspen leaves back dropped by a bluebird sky. An enormous 40-inch-by-50-inch version of the photo is on display at Art on a Whim. "The piece is incredible," said Art on a Whim gallery owner Brian Raitman who is good friends with Angiono. "You see a lot of photographers shoot similar compositions and, in all honesty, they are far from being on the same level. It is one of those pieces that instantly sucks you in. The colors exemplify that perfect bluebird, classic Colorado fall day and the piece is a wonderful mix of realism and abstraction, which I find is very hard to capture with photography." You never see Angiono without his camera, Raitman said, and he's an expert at finding art in all of his surroundings. "He has a way of capturing light that is very surreal and sublime at the same time," Raitman said. "His depth of field is incredible. Details are always vivid in his work, to the point that you can pick out rock croppings on a distant mountain in a small print. You can tell he works hard for his shots too, as many of them come from hard to reach wilderness areas. Others come from the simplest of places, like his backyard."

Logans give major gift to Denver museum

VAIL – Vail Town Councilman Kent Logan and his wife, Vicki, have pledged a $60 million gift to the Denver Art Museum, the museum announced Tuesday. It’s the largest planned gift ever given to the 113-year-old museum. “My hope is that this will act as a catalyst to really galvanize the continued interest in the visual arts community in Denver,” Kent Logan said. Dianne Vanderlip, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Denver Art Museum, said the gift is a huge boost for contemporary art at the museum. “We were already pretty good, but this is just, ‘Oh my God, the lights are really on,’” Vanderlip said. The Logans wanted to continue the momentum the Denver Art Museum has been building with the opening of a new addition and a growing endowment, Logan said. The bequest also includes the donation of the Logans’ 15,000-square-foot home and gallery on Potato Patch Road in Vail. “The attempt here is to create a close working relationship between the Vail Valley and Denver and hopefully promote a joint collaboration,” he said. The gallery wouldn’t become a public museum, Logan said. It would stay a private gallery and could host smaller, private shows, he said. The home could also be a retreat for art scholars, Vanderlip said. The home and gallery are worth about $15 million. The Logans also gave an additional $5 million for the maintenance of the house and gallery. Almost all of the $60 million pledge will be given to the museum after the Logans die. The gift should increase Vail’s presence in the arts scene, Vanderlip said. “This story is going to be picked up by the national and international press,” she said. “It’s going to say Vail, Vail, Vail.” Susan Mackin Dolan, an Edwards artist, agreed the gift could help for the Vail arts scene. “We could get to see some great art up here and maybe have artists-in-residence, curators-in-residence,” she said. “We definitely could use that boost.” ‘The complete story’ The gift also includes all of the art in the couple’s private collection that has not already been promised to the Denver museum. That brings the total amount promised to the museum to over 550 artworks, including paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings and installations. The latest bequest of art is worth about $30 million. The artists include Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons, Franz Ackermann, Katharina Fritsch, Takashi Murakami and Damien Hirst. “When we have our permanent collection on view, we will be able to tell the complete story of 20th- and 21st-century art because of this collection,” Vanderlip said. The Logans gave 213 artworks to the museum in 2003. The bequest also includes a $10 million endowment for the department of modern and contemporary art. The gift adds to the momentum that is growing in Denver’s cultural community, Vanderlip said. “There’s not a another city in the U.S. that can boast the same focus and energy that is going on in Denver right now with regard to its cultural institutions,” she said. ‘Defines the period’ Logan said he collects art because it makes an important statement about the period it was made in. “The art defines the period,” he said. Kent, 62, and Vicki, 59, were married on Vail Mountain in 1985. Kent Logan retired from his career as an investment banker in 2000. He was director of the Equity Division of Bank of America Securities, and previously was an executive with Goldman Sachs, Paine Webber, Barclays and Montgomery Securities. They moved to Vail full-time in 2000 after 10 years in San Francisco. Logan was elected to the Vail Town Council in 2003. The Logans have been collecting for 14 years. An exhibit of the Logans’ work called “Radar: Selections from the Collection of Kent and Vicki Logan” had already been planned to be on exhibit at the opening of the new Denver Art Museum addition this fall. In 2003 and 2004, the Logans’ artwork was also on display at the museum during a special exhibit of Asian art. Staff Writer Edward Stoner can be reached at 949-0555, ext. 14623, or estoner@vaildaily.com. Vail Colorado

Peek inside a private Vail gallery

VAIL, Colorado “-Good art won’t match your sofa, says Vail resident Vicki Logan. It will, however, make you think. It can arouse wonder, amusement, shock, sadness or even disgust. Really great art can be so provocative you might cycle through each of those emotions within a few minutes as you study. On a recent snowy morning, Vail residents Kent and Vicki Logan opened their home and adjoining gallery ” which is filled with just part of their art collection ” to 36 fortunate Vail Symposium participants. While the gallery is private, the Logans ” who are well known in the art world for their contemporary collection ” open their doors to community organizations and groups. The Logan’s have given most of the art away ” they donated a significant portion of the collection to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in the late ’90s and, in 2006, they promised $60 million in art and assets to the Denver Art Museum, the single largest gift in the museum’s 113-year history. As the group gathered in the Logan’s bright living room, Kent, a former Vail town councilman and investment banker, explained their beloved art collection ” its origins, scope and what’s been happening in the contemporary art scene since the economy tanked. Long story short, the bubble has burst. “Imagine everything that happened in the housing market and multiply that by 10 times and that’s really what was going on in the art world,” Kent said. “The whole art world was caught in a very commercial cycle. (Artists) churned it out, just repeated themselves because they could sell it for astronomical sums. The silver lining of a break in the market, such as the period we’re in today, is maybe they go back to the studio. I’m hopeful in a few years we’ll see another wave of creativity and interesting art.” Though the Logans spent most of their adult lives in New York, they didn’t begin collecting art until they moved to San Francisco in the early ’90s. “There’s really no interesting story about why we began (collecting),” Kent said. “It was very spontaneous. One of my new partners invited us for a walk amongst the galleries and we bought our first piece that day and it went straight down hill from there.” The collection, which spans four decades, contains nearly 900 pieces created by 200 artists. The collection is anchored with recognized masters from the ’60s and ’70s who heavily influenced subsequent generations ” Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha and Richard Diebenkorn to name a few. Warhol’s self portrait (1986) is the centerpiece of the Logan’s living room. The other two thirds of the collection represent artists who are living and working today, including contemporary Asian artists and many YBAs ” young British artists from the ’90s, like Damien Hirst. The Logan’s personally know most of the artists, he said. And unlike some art collectors who hire a consultant or an advisor, Kent and Vicki bought every piece in the collection, and never for investment purposes, because “ultimately you’re the one that lives with it,” Kent said. “We don’t expect everyone to like the art. You’ll probably dislike a lot of it, but for better or worse, it’s our aesthetic,” he said. With that, the group was free to wander around the home, taking in the drawings, paintings, sculptures and more tucked in every corner of the Logans’ home ” the kitchen, hallways, bathrooms and even on the decks ” before walking next door to the gallery. Taking in nearly 250 pieces of art in a little over an hour is a little overwhelming, but in a good way. “When I see great art, it just fills me with awe at what we can accomplish as human beings,” said Vicky Lee, the communications director for the Vail Symposium. Rounding a corner in the gallery, Lee gasped at the sight of one floor-to-ceiling painting of what she believed to be a dismembered monster. An hour later, over lunch, she mused how interesting it was that she found the painting startling without being offensive. “It’s interesting because when I looked at the pieces, I learned more about myself by finding how I reacted to them,” Lee said a few days later. “Some contemporary art can be so provocative ” you really gauge where you are in life when you keep looking at art and see how you react. You find that your reactions can change over time.” High Life Editor Caramie Schnell can be reached at 970-748-2984 or cschnell@vaildaily.com.

Vail winter art walks start Wednesday

VAIL, Colorado – There will be free guided tours of Vail Village’s public art collection this winter. The tours with the town’s art in public places coordinator Molly Eppard meet at 3:30 p.m. in the Vail Village Information Center and last for approximately an hour and a half, concluding at a participating gallery. Beginning the tour at the Colorado Ski Museum, learn about the importance of the 10th Mountain Division and the history of skiing in Vail. The tour then leads you through the village with discussions of the master-plan of Vail and the importance of art in creating the charm and beauty of the village. The town’s collection is now valued at $1.4 million with over 37 works ranging from sculptures, murals, playground components, and site-integrated art. The tour dates Jan. 20 and 27, Feb. 3 and 17, March 3, 10, 24 and 31, and April 7. Participating galleries are Claggett/Rey Gallery, Cogswell Gallery, J Cotter Gallery, Karats, Masters Gallery, Pismo Gallery, Vail Fine Art Gallery, Vail International Gallery, and Vail Village Arts. For more information contact Eppard at 970-479-2344 or meppard@vailgov.com.

Gallery Row

Colorado boasts 300 days of sunshine a year, making it difficult to scrap the outdoors for a day spent inside entertaining the more cultural side of life ” like art. In the open air of Vail Village, however, one can spend an entire afternoon strolling through its many art galleries, while still experiencing scenic views, fresh air and sunshine. It’s a perfect balance. Here’s a walking guide to Vail Village art galleries: Start at The Covered Bridge ” one of the village’s most recognized and loved icons. Follow the cobblestone street to Pepi’s and hang a right. Walk a short distance until you see Wall Street on your left. Shoot up the path to Wall Street Fine Art Gallery (on the left), also known as the Richard Haines Gallery. Richard Haines Gallery The owner of this gallery is young bronze sculptor Richard Haines. He sculpts realistic representations of wildlife and people. “Our gallery is more realism than anything else,” Dan Simons, gallery director, said. “We have master works and Russian artists, as well.” From there, head toward the mountain just a few steps and into J. Cotter Gallery. J. Cotter Gallery Jim Cotter, who creates everything in his Minturn studio, has been a gold and silversmith since 1970. He’s only taken two jewelry courses in his life, and the result is free-form jewelry that is nature inspired. “It’s my own interpretation, my own understanding of the way things should be,” Cotter said. “I deal with a lot of alternative materials, everything from gold to concrete. I don’t limit myself to the traditional kinds of things that people assume jewelry is supposed to be made from.” After visiting J. Cotter, head back the way you came down Wall Street and take a left at the intersection. Don’t forget to admire the Children’s Fountain by Dennis Smith on your right. DeMott Gallery is on the right hand side. Enter to experience the spirit of early America. DeMott Gallery Paintings of stoic Native Americans toting rifles or riding in canoes fill the walls of DeMott Gallery, along with landscapes and sculptures also depicting the early American frontier. Cross the street to the Gore Creek Gallery on the left hand side. Gore Creek Gallery Gore Creek Gallery boasts an eclectic collection of original artwork ranging from Southwestern landscapes to limited edition bronzes. The gallery is also a history-buff haven, featuring travel, antiquarian, rare and signed books along with maps and signed documents. “We have a document signed by Philip II of Spain, documents signed by Roosevelt and other presidential signatures,” Jason Hoff, the gallery’s director, said. “The bigger portion of our books are civil war and WWII books, but we also have a ton of sport books.” Upon leaving, follow the curve in the road to Gore Creek Promenade and hang a right. The International Bridge is on the left. Take the promenade to the end where you will find Cogswell Gallery. Cogswell Gallery Variety is the first word director Steven DeWitt thinks of when asked to describe Cogswell Gallery. “Variety with its roots in Western culture, the Western art movement,” DeWitt said. In addition to Western artists like Darcie Peet, who paints plein air around Vail in the summertime, Cogswell showcases a variety of European impressionists and jewelry designers from around the world, including Spain and Israel. You will also find bronze sculptures, weavings and furniture, and wood sculptures created in the spirit of Native Americans. Head back the way you came, this time crossing the International Bridge. Stay long enough over the water, and you might catch a glimpse of a kayaker enjoying the swells. From there, follow the path up until reaching an intersection. Hang a right on East Meadow Drive to hit three more galleries: Vail Village Arts, Pismo and Karats. Vail Village Arts It’s hard to miss Vail Village Arts with its whimsical wind sculptures spinning into infinity out front. Artists Lyman Whitaker and Mark White create them from copper and stainless steel. “We’re extremely eclectic and colorful,” John Vickers, the gallery owner, said. “The gallery concept starts with color and from there it can go into all different directions, from abstracts to contemporary to realism to more landscape and wildlife pieces.” PISMO “Every time you walk in here, it’s awe,” Chelsey Braley of PISMO gallery said. Colorful glass manipulated hot and cold by some of the world’s most talented glass artists is the awe of which Braley speaks. PISMO gallery is a dish for eye candy, where the imagination can run for hours. Think Dr. Suess or Willie Wonka. Pieces resemble anything from a tear drop to a sea shell to a melting face, and each one changes as the sun maneuvers in the sky. “Glass is the only medium that interacts with light,” Eva Pobjecka, the gallery’s manager said. “Everything you see in here will change with the light.” I think that’s an invitation to stay all day. The last stop on this side of East Meadow Drive is a couple doors down ” Karats. Karats Karats is the only artist working studio gallery in Vail Village with five artists creating jewelry there at any given time for all to watch. Dan Telleen, whose lived in Vail for 36 years, owns the gallery and is one of the jewelry makers. Telleen has a fascination for time, and his jewelry is a mix of old and new elements. “We use a lot of elements in our jewelry that are old,” Telleen said. “Fossils, coins or artifacts, like stone artifacts or Egyptian scarabs. I’m a real collector of things.” In addition to the five local jewelry designers, the gallery is accented by sculptors, painters and hand-made ceramics from around the country and world. Head back down East Meadow Drive and hit Art Novell on the right, up the stairs in the Crossroads Center. Art Novell Art Novell features artists, mostly from Eastern Europe, who may not be familiar yet. The gallery’s most world renowned artist is Ioan Nemtoi from Romania, gallery director Mirela Van Dyke said. Nemtoi, a glass artist, emerged ” like a lot of Art Novell’s artists ” when communism began to fall in Eastern Europe. “Artists didn’t feel like creating. Their muses left them,” Van Dyke said of communism’s impact on art. “But once communism got out, beautiful colors surfaced.” Continue circling around the Crossroads Center and look for the blue awning. Enter Englishman Fine European Antique Art and Furnishing. Englishman Fine European Antique Art and Furnishing The Englishman offers one of the largest collections of 18th, 19th and early 20th century European oil paintings in the United States. The antique art is displayed among functional art of the antique furniture variety. Walk across the parking lot to Vail Fine Art for your next gallery stop. Vail Fine Art Vail Fine Arts adds real international flavor to the village art scene with pieces from around the globe, including France, Spain, Poland and Russia. Vail Fine Art features the playful, romantic paintings of Poland’s Michal Zaborowski, for example. He paints people doing everyday activities, like dancing in the living room or a maid taking a break. The scenes are fluid and intriguing. “Our works focus mainly on impressionism,” Jared Heye of the gallery said. “We have some realist pieces, also, some photo realism. It’s museum-quality art work.” Exit the Crossroads area and head west down East Meadow Drive. Head past Annie’s and up the stairs to Vail Village Inn Plaza and into Clagget/Rey gallery behind Camp Di Fiori restaurant. Claggett / Rey The wild, wild west is captured in the art at Claggett/Rey gallery, which represents traditional American art created by many Cowboy Artists. “It’s representational art. It’s figurative sculpture, wildlife sculpture and landscape paintings,” Laura Wolf, the gallery’s marketing director, said. Exiting Claggett/Rey, turn right and swing around past Verbatim Booksellers, past Joe Beeler’s sculpture of the Indian and into Vail International Gallery. Vail International Gallery When co-owner of Vail International Gallery Marc LeVarn buys art, he’s looking for quality. “We wanted our gallery to feature work from Europe and different countries around the world, as well as have art from Colorado that we think would be interesting to people from around other parts of the world,” LeVarn said. “We wanted it go both ways.” Head down the stairs from Vail Village Inn Plaza back to East Meadow Drive for your last gallery spot. Master’s Gallery Master’s Gallery is a place with personality, attributed to both its wide range of fine art and enthusiastic director, Rayla Kundolf. “We’re contemporary, eclectic and diverse” said Kundolf, who will happily chat up the personality of each artist, as well. Ranging from the more classical, like West Germany’s Jurgen Gorg, to the pop wild pieces of Kaufman, who is influenced by Andy Warhol, Master’s is the type of gallery you can wander for hours without seeing the same artistic style twice. After a long afternoon of soaking in worldly creativity, hunger is sure to strike. From Master’s Gallery, head next door to La Bottega, a quaint Italian bistro. Order one of their famous cheesesteaks or panini and a glass of Chianti. The wine just might inspire you to buy that piece of art you can’t stop thinking about. Vail, Colorado

Vail Valley Art Guild opens new gallery at Chapel Square in Avon

AVON — The Vail Valley Art Guild will celebrate the opening of its new Art of the Valley Gallery this Thanksgiving weekend. The gallery is located at 240 Chapel Square, Unit 119, in Avon. The guild describes itself as "a group of unassuming local artists who fuse imagination, truth and creativity in explosive new ways," adding that this is not just another art gallery but a new iteration of art culture in the area. ABOUT THE ART GUILD The Vail Valley Art Guild is a nonprofit organization created in 2013 to promote the visual arts in the Vail Valley. All of the artists live, work and create in our community and staff the gallery on a voluntary basis. The guild's shows allow art enthusiasts to experience the collaborative efforts of artists working in the mediums of oil, acrylic, water colors, photography, mixed media, charcoal, pen, ink, ceramics and even paper sculptures. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily, and art is available for purchase. To learn more about the Art of the Valley Gallery or the Vail Valley Art Guild, visit http://www.vailvalleyartguild.com.

New art gallery opens in Vail

VAIL — The Art on a Whim Gallery has arrived in Vail with a unique concept — art should be fun. It should make us smile. While beauty is ever present in the Art on a Whim collection, the gallery derives its distinctive presence from the belief that pushing the envelope and having fun while doing so is what makes art worthwhile. As a result, you would be hard pressed to leave their Bridge Street locations without a smile on your face. Art on a Whim opened in Breckenridge in 2007, gaining acclaim and a strong following on the other side of Vail Pass. The gallery is a family-owned business and one of the Raitmans is always on hand to provide an intriguing tour through their collection. In addition, each weekend throughout the winter season one or more of the gallery's artists will be on hand offering demonstrations and in-depth explanations about their techniques. The Raitman family set upon naming their gallery Art on a Whim for a multitude of reasons. For one, the idea of opening a gallery was just a dream for the family for a number of years. In 2007 they woke up one day and decided, on a whim, that making the dream of owning a fine art gallery would be a great idea. Given the gallery's name, and the Raitman's propensity for showing work that makes people smile, there are several artists with permanent homes in the collection that create work which can certainly be described as whimsical. For example, DD LaRue's "Dog in a VW Door" sculptures of dogs hanging their furry heads out of car windows are off the wall, quirky and fun. The two brand new gallery spaces mean a wide array of new artists have been introduced to Vail this season. Most of Art on a Whim's artists make their homes right here in Colorado. Upon the opening of the new gallery spaces, Lelija Roy decided to make her home in Vail for the onset of the winter season. She can be seen painting her richly textured mixed-media aspen scenes in the gallery's show space every day. Roy combines up to 20 layers of hand-made rice papers, fabrics, acrylics, india inks and more to perfectly capture Colorado's most stunning scenery. Artists like Chris Lundy and Cynthia Duff provide a unique flair to the gallery through their use of untypical mediums to create deep, reflective resin paintings and bent birch wood wall sculptures, respectively. Alex Gupton, Tracy Felix and Robert Bissell bring fun to the collection with phenomenally detailed pieces showing musical instruments inside of music notes, marshmallow clouds floating through the mountains and bears playing in landscapes resembling our ideals of Eden. The gallery features approximately 20 artists and ensures that each well-regarded and accomplished artist finds a niche within the gallery. This both distinguishes each artist within the gallery and the gallery as a whole, making Art on a Whim a lovely addition to the Vail Village's world-class collection of galleries. Today, Art on a Whim welcomes you to join in the spirit of the holiday season and celebrate the opening of their new locations. The Raitman family and several of the gallery's artists will be on hand to help spread joy and prepare to ring in the New Year. Artist talks will take place throughout the evening and food and drinks will be served to help commemorate the gallery's grand opening. Art on a Whim is located at 227 Bridge Street and 286 Bridge Street. The party will take place from 4 to 8 p.m.

Best Of: Gallery in Vail

Masters Gallery is part gallery, part community service. That’s due to gallery director Rayla Kundolf, whose first goal isn’t to sell art but to encourage it. “Every day people come into the gallery,” she says. “They may not have the means to purchase at this time, however, it does not stop their appreciation of art… Art makes them feel good about themselves, about life. It’s like an escape.” That sentiment overflows from the walls, which are filled with varied work chosen by Kundolf. Vail’s PISMO Gallery is one piece of a glass-gallery family. Specializing in both functional and non-functional (read: art for art’s sake) glass, it’s a colorful world. Vail International Gallery has carved out a fine niche in the local art scene. Filled with the work or artists from Holland to Italy to Colorado, there’s not another gallery like it. The bronze bells, traditional paintings and intricate wood collages are exciting. Vail Village Arts is known for its downright frolicsome collection. Check out the kinetic sculptures, lifelike statues and highly detailed trompe l’oeil.

Art Sled Exhibit on display in Vail

VAIL – Art in Public Places’ First Invitational Art Sled Exhibition opens today at Vail Village participating art galleries, The Colorado Ski & Snowboard Museum, and the town of Vail Public Library. Promoting art, sustainability, creativity, recreation and community, the wooden sleds collected through generous donations have been re-created by local artists and are available to be purchased by silent auction. The bid sheets accompany the sleds at the locations where they are on view. A portion of the money raised will go towards funding future AIPP programs.”I am incredibly pleased with the efforts to which the selected artists re-created the sleds. They are all unique and reflect the artist’s creativity and talent. The process of transforming the dusty wooden sleds into works of art has been a delight to witness. Art in Public Places is thrilled to finally present these works of art by local artists to the public,” said Molly Eppard, Art in Public Places coordinator. The local artists selected for the Art Sled project include: Students from the Alpine Arts Center, Mio Cirkovic, Amy Dose, Colleen Everett and Laura Nash, Horst Essl, Carrie Fell, Sarah Melzer, Jenna Oppenheimer and Dustin Zentz.One art sled will be on view at each of these participating locations beginning today through March 16:Claggett Rey Gallery, Cogswell Gallery, Masters Gallery, Pismo Gallery, Vail Fine Art Gallery, Vail International Gallery, Vail Village Arts, Worth Home, The Colorado Ski & Snowboard Museum and town of Vail Public Library. The sleds will be exhibited collectively at Worth Interiors in Solaris March 18 – 20.

Take a walk on the cultural side

VAIL ” Colorado boasts 300 days of sunshine a year, making it difficult to scrap the outdoors for a day spent inside entertaining the more cultural side of life ” like art. In the open air of Vail Village, however, one can spend an entire afternoon strolling through its many art galleries while still experiencing scenic views, fresh air and sunshine. It’s a perfect balance. Here is a walking guide to Vail Village art galleries: Start at The Covered Bridge ” one of the village’s most recognized and loved icons. Follow the cobblestone street to Pepi’s and hang a right. Walk a short distance until you see Wall Street on your left. Shoot up the path to Wall Street Fine Art Gallery (on the left), also known as the Richard Haines Gallery. The owner of this gallery is young bronze sculptor Richard Haines, who at age 30 already has a strong following. He sculpts realistic representations of wildlife and people. “Our gallery is more realism than anything else,” Dan Simons, gallery director, said. “We have master works and Russian artists, as well.” From there, head toward the mountain just a few steps and into J. Cotter Gallery. =Jim Cotter, who creates everything in his Minturn studio, has been a gold and silversmith since 1970. He’s only taken two jewelry courses in his life, and the result is free-form jewelry that is nature inspired. “It’s my own interpretation, my own understanding of the way things should be,” Cotter said. “I deal with a lot of alternative materials, everything from gold to concrete. I don’t limit myself to the traditional kinds of things that people assume jewelry is supposed to be made from.” After visiting J. Cotter, head back the way you came down Wall Street and take a left at the intersection, which begins the Lodge at Vail Promenade. Don’t forget to admire the Children’s Fountain by Dennis Smith on your right. Walk down the promenade until reaching DeMott Gallery, also on the right hand side. Enter to experience the spirit of early America. Paintings of stoic Native Americans toting rifles or riding in canoes fill the walls of DeMott Gallery, along with landscapes and sculptures also depicting the early-American frontier. DeMott Gallery represents traditional American art and features artist that excel in the genre, including Skip Whitcomb, Clyde Aspevig and Gary Price. Cross the street to the Gore Creek Gallery, adjacent to Checkpoint Charlie, on the left hand side. Gore Creek Gallery boasts an eclectic collection of original art work ranging from Southwestern landscapes to limited-edition bronzes. Most of the collection is classical. The gallery is also a history-buff haven, featuring travel, antiquarian and rare and signed books, along with maps and signed documents. “We have a document signed by Philip II of Spain, documents signed by Roosevelt and other presidential signatures,” Jason Hoff, the gallery’s director, said. “The bigger portion of our books are Civil War and World War II books, but we also have a ton of sport books, and some of those are signed.” The gallery houses two jewelry designers, Harmony Scott and Kelli Brown, who work in semi-precious to precious gems, gold, silver and pearls. There’s a little something for everyone at the Gore Creek Gallery. Leaving Lodge at Vail Promenade, follow the curve in the road to Gore Creek Promenade and hang a right. The International Bridge is on the left. Take the promenade to the end where you will find Cogswell Gallery. Variety is the first word director Steven DeWitt thinks of when asked to describe Cogswell Gallery. “Variety with its roots in Western culture, the Western art movement,” DeWitt said. In addition to Western artists such as Darcie Peet, who paints plein air around Vail in the summertime, Cogswell showcases a variety of European impressionists and jewelry designers from around the world, including Spain and Israel. You will also find bronze sculptures, weavings and furniture, and wood sculptures created in the spirit of Native Americans. Head back the way you came down Gore Creek Promenade, this time crossing the International Bridge. Stay long enough over the water and you might catch a glimpse of a kayaker enjoying the swells. From there, follow the path up until reaching an intersection. Hang a right on East Meadow Drive to hit three more galleries, Vail Village Arts, Pismo and Karats. It’s hard to miss Vail Village Arts, with its whimsical wind sculptures spinning into infinity out front. Artists Lyman Whitaker and Mark White create them from copper and stainless steel. Vail Village Arts is more contemporary than most of its village neighbors. “We’re extremely eclectic and colorful,” John Vickers, the gallery owner, said. “The gallery concept starts with color and from there it can go into all different directions from abstracts to contemporary to realism to more landscape and wildlife pieces.” Vail Village Arts’ sister gallery, The Vickers Collection, is located in Beaver Creek with more colorful paintings and wind sculptures. You don’t have to go far for the next explosion in color. PISMO gallery is neighbors with Vail Village Arts. “Every time you walk in here, it’s awe,” Chelsey Braley of PISMO gallery said. Colorful glass manipulated hot and cold by some of the world’s most talented glass artists (such as Chihuly, Tagliapietra, Kuhn and Ries) is the awe of which Braley speaks. PISMO gallery ” which has a larger, more impressive location in Beaver Creek Village ” is a dish for eye candy, where the imagination can run for hours. Think Dr. Seuss or Willie Wonka. Pieces resemble anything from a tear drop to a sea shell to a melting face, and each one changes as the sun maneuvers in the sky. “Glass is the only medium that interacts with light,” Eva Pobjecka, the gallery’s manager said. “Everything you see in here will change with the light.” I think that’s an invitation to stay all day. The last stop on this side of East Meadow Drive is a couple doors down ” Karats. Karats is the only working studio gallery in Vail Village with five artists creating jewelry there at any given time for all to watch. Dan Telleen, who has lived in Vail for 36 years, owns the gallery and is one of the jewelry makers. Telleen has a fascination with time, and his jewelry is a mix of old and new elements. “We use a lot of elements in our jewelry that are old,” Telleen said. “Fossils, coins or artifacts, like stone artifacts or Egyptian scarabs. I’m a real collector of things.” In addition to the five local jewelry designers, the gallery is accented by sculptors, painters and hand-made ceramics from around the country and the world. Telleen also exhibits other jewelry artists from around the world. Head back down East Meadow Drive, past the galleries you just visited, and hit Art Novell on the right, up the stairs in the Crossroads Center. Art Novell features artists, mostly from Eastern Europe, who may not be familiar yet but are slowly but surely making their mark on the American art scene. The gallery’s most world-renowned artist is Ioan Nemtoi from Romania, Gallery Director Mirela Van Dyke said. Van Dyke is also from Romania. Nemtoi, a glass artist, emerged ” like a lot of Art Novell’s artists ” when communism began to fall in Eastern Europe. “Artists didn’t feel like creating. Their muses left them,” Van Dyke said of communism’s impact on art. “But once communism got out, beautiful colors surfaced. Ioan Nemtoi is a good example of this.” When asked what Art Novell’s personality is, Van Dyke answered, “new, refreshing, bold and extremely artistic.” Continue circling around the Crossroads Center and look for the blue awning. Enter Englishman Fine European Antique Art and Furnishing. The Englishman offers one of the largest collections of 18th, 19th and early-20th century European oil paintings in the United States. The antique art is displayed among functional art of the antique furniture variety. The decorative furniture and accessories are sourced by a team in London, where the Englishman has a private gallery. The team travels Europe looking for unique pieces and paintings, and they are restored in a workshop. The Englishman also has galleries in Naples and Atlanta and has been trading in the U.S. for 25 years. Pass the market and movie theater to Vail Fine Art for your next gallery stop. Vail Fine Art adds real international flavor to the village art scene with pieces from around the globe, including France, Spain, Poland and Russia. Vail Fine Art features the playful, romantic paintings of Poland’s Michal Zaborowski, for example. He paints people doing everyday activities, such as dancing in the living room or a maid taking a break. The scenes are fluid and intriguing. “Our works focus mainly on impressionism,” Jared Heye, of the gallery, said. “We have some realist pieces, also some photo realism. It’s museum-quality art work.” Exit the Crossroads area and head west down East Meadow Drive. Head past Annie’s shoes and up the stairs to Vail Village Inn Plaza and into Claggett/Rey Gallery behind Camp Di Fiori restaurant. The wild, wild West is captured in the art at Claggett/Rey Gallery, which represents traditional American art created by many cowboy artists. “It’s representational art. It’s figurative sculpture, wildlife sculpture and landscape paintings,” Laura Wolf, the gallery’s marketing director, said. Exiting Claggett/Rey, turn right and swing around past Verbatim Booksellers, past Joe Beeler’s sculpture of the Indian and into Vail International Gallery. When co-owner of Vail International Gallery Marc LeVarn buys art, he’s looking for quality. He may pick up just one piece from an artist because it strikes him, making Vail International Gallery very boutique. “We wanted our gallery to feature work from Europe and different countries around the world, as well as have art from Colorado that we think would be interesting to people from around other parts of the world,” LeVarn said. “We wanted it to go both ways.” Head down the stairs from Vail Village Inn Plaza back to East Meadow Drive for your last ” but not least ” gallery spot. Master’s Gallery is a place with personality, attributed to its wide range of fine art and enthusiastic director, Rayla Kundolf. “We’re contemporary, eclectic, diverse and also have some contemporary works,” said Kundolf, who will happily chat up the personality of each artist as well. Ranging from the more classical, such as West Germany’s Jurgen Gorg, to the pop wild pieces of Steve Kaufman, who is influenced by Andy Warhol, Master’s is the type of gallery you can wander for hours without seeing the same artistic style twice. After a long afternoon of soaking in worldly creativity, hunger is sure to strike. From Master’s Gallery, head to Alpenrose, basically next door, to enjoy the sunny patio. Order one of their famous rum balls or other delicate pastries and a glass of pinot noir. The wine just might inspire you to buy that piece of art you can’t stop thinking about. Vail, Colorado You could spend a day walking the art galleries in just about every little town in our valley. Here are other gallery highlights: Edwards Philinda Gallery, located in the Riverwalk at 0137 Main Street in the Diamond Building. Call 926-9265. Philinda Gallery is known for its diverse collections depicting a variety of subjects in different mediums. The gallery has the largest wood collection in Colorado, including works by the Italian master carvers from the UNIKA group, who have visited the gallery for an interactive show. African wildlife paintings and Native American art also are exhibited. Beaver Creek PISMO Gallery, located in the Village Hall of Beaver Creek. Call 949-0908. This gallery specializes in glass artists. You can’t miss the huge blue Chihuly sculpture in the window of PISMO, and it warrants a separate trip up to Beaver Creek. It’s 12 feet high, weighs 900 pounds and consists of 300 individual pieces. This may be their most impressive piece, but some of the other smaller glass works at least rival its beauty. Eagle-Vail Strange Imports, located on U.S. Highway 6 and 24 in Eagle-Vail. Call 928-0198. Some may not consider furniture or vases fine art, but after seeing some of owner David Dixon’s Tibetan hand-painted furniture, art collectors may think otherwise. Strange Imports features furniture, wood carvings, ceramics and Buddha statues, among other home accessories, from Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Burma, Cambodia, Mongolia, Tibet and China. Dixon has been traveling to Asia since the ’70s, and he is wealth of information about the history and original use of his pieces. Minturn Milhoan Studios and Gallery, located at 141 Williams St. behind the Minturn Country Club. Call 827-5615. Artist Randy Milhoan always has been intrigued by primitive and folk art. Right now, Milhoan said, he’s painting a lot of “invented images.” This summer in addition to his work, he will be featuring artists David Cummings, Sura Pleet, Bill Potts and his son, Prent, who is exploring the extension of Cubism. His gallery will be open by appointment Saturdays during the Minturn Market. Vail, Colorado