| VailDaily.com

Jo Brown 1929-2014 One of Vail's strongest heartbeats, Jo Brown, a 45-year resident of the Vail Valley, died while surrounded by her family on June 26 of lymphoma, which she battled for 10 years. Jo was born Feb. 7, 1929, in Hugoton, Kan., to Carl Edward Jones and Catherine (Kascak) Jones. She was born in the house connected to the jail because her father was the Stevens County sheriff, where her mother cooked and cleaned for the prisoners. She was the sixth of seven children and her mother died when she was 9 years old. Her older sister married when Jo was 11, leaving Jo to cook and clean for her father and three remaining brothers while attending school. She grew up on a farm with no indoor plumbing during the Dust Bowl Days, graduated high school in 1945 and went to University of Kansas for one year. When Jo returned to Hugoton to work at the front desk of the ration stamps office, she re-met recently discharged Navy sailor Ernest Brown (they had gone to Hugoton High School together) and once Ernie got a look at beautiful Jo, there was no looking back. They fell in love and married on June 21, 1947. They recently marked their 67th wedding anniversary. They moved to Denver where Ernie completed his accounting degree at the University of Denver, living in an 8-by-24-foot trailer with no running water. Their first child, Cathy Marie, was born in 1949. They often laughed about their getting around Denver on a scooter in January, and breaking ice on water in their tiny home. Ernie got a job working in the accounting office for Phillips 66 in Bartlesville, Okla., where their three other children were born: Jo Elaine in 1954, Barbara Ann in 1955 and Michael Ernest in 1959. Ernie worked his accounting job and two other part-time jobs to provide for his family, while Jo kept the house running smoothly. In 1962, Ernie had an opportunity to move up in the company, and the family moved to Aurora. More transfers led the family to Lamar; El Paso, Texas; and finally Dumas, Texas, where Ernie and Jo said they'd had enough of the transfers. After trying his hand as an oil broker back in Lamar, Ernie heard of an opportunity to open a gas station in this new town called Vail. He was able to obtain the contract and lease on the new gas station, and in August of 1969, they moved their family for the final time. They brought three kids (Cathy was already in college), a dog, a cat, two chinchillas and two pet ducks, and moved into a tiny half duplex on the Gore Creek in East Vail. Ernie opened the Gulf Station located at the four-way entrance to Vail, which is now where the Four Seasons is located. The two girls started at Battle Mountain High School, and Mike went to school at a little elementary school above the clinic, where Vail Valley Medical Center is located. Jo went to work at Bishop Perry Property Management in the Gold Peak House and Ernie made his 24-hour gas station a success. After his second winter of schlepping tire chains up Vail Pass to motorists stranded in blizzards, he ultimately opened Vail Auto Supply (NAPA) and ran the business for 22 years until his retirement in 1995. Jo, meanwhile, acquired her real estate license, then her brokers license and worked in several offices, including a partnershp in Coldwell Banker, until she ultimately ended up at Slifer Smith and Frampton. She was Realtor of the Year in 1989, was president of the Vail Board of Realtors that same year, and served on the ethics committee. She worked with senators and representatives to develop real estate law. They'd work with the Kruegers, the Simontons and other families on Christmas Eve to make paper bag luminarias and line the streets of Vail leading to the Vail Chapel. Jo was also responsible for locating the property and negotiating the deal to buy land from generous Steve Ruder to build the last interfaith chapel in the valley in Edwards, and served on the Vail Religious Board up until her death. Jo and Ernie thrived in the Vail Valley and made hundreds of friends during the past 45 years. They were a part of the Bavarian Dancers, who would troop into an event with Dave Pratt and his accordion, and Jo in her dirndl skirt and Ernie in his leiderhosen and the others would perform Bavarian dances. She was a part of a group of Bridge players. Jo love kittens and puppies and chickens. She loved the Broncos and the Rockies and any other Colorado team. She loved columbines and yellow roses. She loved her mountains. She loved the color orange. She left each of her children with beautiful Christmas stockings that she hand made, and each grandchild with Christmas tree skirts to be used for generations. Jo is survived by Ernie; children Cathy Manchee, of Grand Junction, Elaine (Edward) Turnbull, of Edwards, Barbara Schumacher, of Fruita, Mike Brown, of Palisade, and honorary daughter Shoka Tao; grandchildren Jenny (Ryan) Hudson, Adam (Amber) Duran, Megan (Roderic) Rosario, Tosha (Shane) Dixon, Desiree (Justin) Himes, Michael (Whitney) Brown, Benjamin (Tina) Manchee and Catie Manchee and Jennifer (Dave) Neadeau; and great-grandchildren Coby, Addie Jo, Lane, Emree Jo, Louie, Isabella, Raef, McKenna, Cora, Chloe Jo, Dylan, Chase, Collin and yet to be born Aria and Ryan; her brothers Edward Carl (Chicken) Jones and Bruce (Patricia) Jones; and hundreds of co-workers and friends who loved her for her hard-work ethic, her warm smile and wise advice.

Vail Daily obituary: Jo Brown, 1929-2014

One of Vail's strongest heartbeats, Jo Brown, a 45-year resident of the Vail Valley, died while surrounded by her family on June 26 of lymphoma, which she battled for 10 years. Jo was born Feb. 7, 1929, in Hugoton, Kan., to Carl Edward Jones and Catherine (Kascak) Jones. She was born in the house connected to the jail because her father was the Stevens County sheriff, where her mother cooked and cleaned for the prisoners. She was the sixth of seven children and her mother died when she was 9 years old. Her older sister married when Jo was 11, leaving Jo to cook and clean for her father and three remaining brothers while attending school. She grew up on a farm with no indoor plumbing during the Dust Bowl Days, graduated high school in 1945 and went to University of Kansas for one year. When Jo returned to Hugoton to work at the front desk of the ration stamps office, she re-met recently discharged Navy sailor Ernest Brown (they had gone to Hugoton High School together) and once Ernie got a look at beautiful Jo, there was no looking back. They fell in love and married on June 21, 1947. They recently marked their 67th wedding anniversary. They moved to Denver where Ernie completed his accounting degree at the University of Denver, living in an 8-by-24-foot trailer with no running water. Their first child, Cathy Marie, was born in 1949. They often laughed about their getting around Denver on a scooter in January, and breaking ice on water in their tiny home. Ernie got a job working in the accounting office for Phillips 66 in Bartlesville, Okla., where their three other children were born: Jo Elaine in 1954, Barbara Ann in 1955 and Michael Ernest in 1959. Ernie worked his accounting job and two other part-time jobs to provide for his family, while Jo kept the house running smoothly. In 1962, Ernie had an opportunity to move up in the company, and the family moved to Aurora. More transfers led the family to Lamar; El Paso, Texas; and finally Dumas, Texas, where Ernie and Jo said they'd had enough of the transfers. After trying his hand as an oil broker back in Lamar, Ernie heard of an opportunity to open a gas station in this new town called Vail. He was able to obtain the contract and lease on the new gas station, and in August of 1969, they moved their family for the final time. They brought three kids (Cathy was already in college), a dog, a cat, two chinchillas and two pet ducks, and moved into a tiny half duplex on the Gore Creek in East Vail. Ernie opened the Gulf Station located at the four-way entrance to Vail, which is now where the Four Seasons is located. The two girls started at Battle Mountain High School, and Mike went to school at a little elementary school above the clinic, where Vail Valley Medical Center is located. Jo went to work at Bishop Perry Property Management in the Gold Peak House and Ernie made his 24-hour gas station a success. After his second winter of schlepping tire chains up Vail Pass to motorists stranded in blizzards, he ultimately opened Vail Auto Supply (NAPA) and ran the business for 22 years until his retirement in 1995. Jo, meanwhile, acquired her real estate license, then her brokers license and worked in several offices, including a partnershp in Coldwell Banker, until she ultimately ended up at Slifer Smith and Frampton. She was Realtor of the Year in 1989, was president of the Vail Board of Realtors that same year, and served on the ethics committee. She worked with senators and representatives to develop real estate law. They'd work with the Kruegers, the Simontons and other families on Christmas Eve to make paper bag luminarias and line the streets of Vail leading to the Vail Chapel. Jo was also responsible for locating the property and negotiating the deal to buy land from generous Steve Ruder to build the last interfaith chapel in the valley in Edwards, and served on the Vail Religious Board up until her death. Jo and Ernie thrived in the Vail Valley and made hundreds of friends during the past 45 years. They were a part of the Bavarian Dancers, who would troop into an event with Dave Pratt and his accordion, and Jo in her dirndl skirt and Ernie in his leiderhosen and the others would perform Bavarian dances. She was a part of a group of Bridge players. Jo love kittens and puppies and chickens. She loved the Broncos and the Rockies and any other Colorado team. She loved columbines and yellow roses. She loved her mountains. She loved the color orange. She left each of her children with beautiful Christmas stockings that she hand made, and each grandchild with Christmas tree skirts to be used for generations. Jo is survived by Ernie; children Cathy Manchee, of Grand Junction, Elaine (Edward) Turnbull, of Edwards, Barbara Schumacher, of Fruita, Mike Brown, of Palisade, and honorary daughter Shoka Tao; grandchildren Jenny (Ryan) Hudson, Adam (Amber) Duran, Megan (Roderic) Rosario, Tosha (Shane) Dixon, Desiree (Justin) Himes, Michael (Whitney) Brown, Benjamin (Tina) Manchee and Catie Manchee and Jennifer (Dave) Neadeau; and great-grandchildren Coby, Addie Jo, Lane, Emree Jo, Louie, Isabella, Raef, McKenna, Cora, Chloe Jo, Dylan, Chase, Collin and yet to be born Aria and Ryan; her brothers Edward Carl (Chicken) Jones and Bruce (Patricia) Jones; and hundreds of co-workers and friends who loved her for her hard-work ethic, her warm smile and wise advice.

Vail Daily letter: Nice job, Edwards Post Office!

The U.S. Postal Service often takes a lot of flak for poor service and particularly at this time of year when stress levels run high. So, we want to give credit to the Edwards Post Office. Ernie and I went there last week to mail 15 Priority Mail Boxes to Afghanistan. Postal Clerk Adela Bustamante took all those packages in and did the paperwork with a smile on her face . What a great attitude that says I like my job and I am so thankful to have it. Thanks Adele. We are thankful for people like you. Ernie and Jo Brown Vail

Ernie Chavez

For Ernie Chavez, Vail’s very first postmaster, family now takes precedence in life. Three out of his four children have their own babies, making Ernie grandfather to six children. His eyes light up every time he speaks of them and it’s obvious that each of them has a tight grip on his heart.”My grandchildren are so special to me,” Ernie says.Ernie was born in Gilman where his father spent 43 years working the mine. He attended schools in both Gilman and later in Red Cliff, after the family of 10 (Ernie was one of eight children) moved to Red Cliff.Right after graduating from high school, Ernie joined the military and headed west.”I graduated on the 31st of May and on June 2nd I was in California. I enlisted in the Navy along with two good friends. We got caught by the recruiter,” Ernie remembers with a smile.Ernie spent nearly four years in the Navy and a year before he got out, he married his high-school sweetheart, Hazel.”He’s still the love of my life after 44 years,” Hazel says. “He’s still my high school sweetheart. What’s special about Ernie? He’s so giving with his time and his love to his whole family, to all of us.”After four years in California, Ernie and Hazel decided to move back to the valley where they both grew up and where both of their large extended families still lived. They moved into a modest house in Minturn where they’ve lived for the past 42 years, a vantage point from which they’ve watched their children grow, along with a thriving Vail Valley.Upon Ernie’s return he followed in his father’s footsteps and took a job at the mine in Gilman, it was 1962. For five years Ernie worked various jobs at the mine, from the crusher, to the mill, to the electrical room.”There wasn’t much around here in those days,” Ernie says, “you either worked in the mine or if you were lucky, you got a job and worked on the railroad.”In 1966 Ernie was recommended by local politician Nellie Young and hired on as Vail’s postmaster.”You know where the Mug Shop is in Vail? That’s where the first post office was. I had one clerk; her name was Maxine Elliott. And we had 225 post office boxes.”Ernie served as postmaster of Vail for over 33 years and saw the post office housed at four locations before it settled in what is now its home. In October of 1992 Ernie opted to take an early retirement.”I saw it go from one employee and 225 post office boxes to 37 employees and 6,600 post office boxes and of course, we had started city delivery in 1979,” Ernie says. “The holidays were probably the hardest. From early December to the first week of January, none of my employees could have any time off. We went from like 200 parcels a day to 1,000 parcels a day and the mail volume increased ten-fold.”I wouldn’t have been able to do everything without Hazel, she was taking care of everyone.”After retirement, Ernie realized that he wasn’t going to be able to sit still for long.”I was going crazy when I left the post officeI was bored. You can only do so much fishing and hunting,” Ernie says.Soon after he started working for the Town of Vail as a bus driver, where he now serves as a supervisor. This will be his 13th year working for the TOV. Ernie is planning on retiring (again) come next spring and plans on leaving the valley for good in a little over a year. Ernie’s wife Hazel will be retiring from First Bank in December and he and Hazel plan to start building a house in Grand Junction this spring. The house will be centrally located between his oldest and youngest daughters, Monica and Wendy who both live in Grand Junction with their families.”Once we get into the winter, I don’t mind the snow but when it comes to March and April, I’m tired of the snow and by then, driving a bus, I was really ready to do something else.”I’m glad that we [raised our family] here, I don’t think we would’ve liked it better anywhere else. I always thought that this was a good school system. There’s no place I would have rather been then here, I think it’s a great place to raise a family.”Besides Ernie’s work as Postmaster and working for the TOV, he served as Minturn’s mayor for two years and was on the school board for 12 years (as both president and secretary). He has also stayed active in the community by being the local selective service representative and serving on the Minturn cemetery board.Ernie still has plenty of time to take care of his eight-year-old grandson Zeke and his five-year-old granddaughter Kyleigh. Ernie watched the kids during the day before they were in school, and at night he would drive his bus route. Now that both kids are in school, part of Ernie’s job is to pick up both kids from school a couple of afternoons a week.”The really big thing for me now is my grandkids,” Ernie says. “It’s so different from raising my own kids. I just love it. Family is the biggest thing in my life.” VT

Vail Daily obituary: Ernie Dunlevie, 1917-2013

Ernest "Ernie" Dunlevie passed peacefully at age 96 on Oct. 7 at his home in Bermuda Dunes, Calif., surrounded by his family. Ernie was born Aug. 3, 1917, in New York City, the only son of Adelaide and George Dunlevie. Ernie spent most of his youth in East Orange, N.J. In 1936, after graduating from East Orange High School, Ernie and his mother drove across country to Palm Springs to visit artist friends who spent their winters in the desert. The allure of the area captured them both and they never left. Ernie was a tireless worker throughout his life. When World War II broke out in 1941, Ernie enlisted in the Army Air Corps, trained to fly B-17 and B-29 aircrafts in Salina, Kan., as well as Denver, and was then stationed in India. Ernie flew bombing missions ranging throughout China, Japan and Formosa (now Taiwan). On May 1, 1944, his plane was shot down over Burma. After parachuting out at an altitude of 18,000 feet, Ernie and his crew were separated in the jungle, but later found by natives and reunited at a nearby English tea plantation. For the Burma mission and in recognition of his exemplary service during the war, Ernie was decorated with the Asiatic-Pacific Theater Medal, Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross. When the war ended, Ernie got his real estate license. Over his 68-year real estate career, Ernie served many grateful clients including celebrities such as Cary Grant, Fernando Lamas, Howard Hughes and Ava Gardner, many became lifelong friends. His success in business led him to serve in many leadership roles in the real estate industry and community, including president of the Palm Springs and Southern California Board of Realtors, Southern California Golf Association, as well as numerous other boards. In the late 1950s, Ernie along with Ray Ryan developed Bermuda Dunes Country Club, which included Bermuda Dunes Airport and Bermuda Dunes Racquet Club (now Murph's Gaslight Restaurant). In developing Bermuda Dunes, Ernie met Clark Gable and they became close friends. Clark maintained a home at Bermuda Dunes until his passing, where Ernie served as a pallbearer at his funeral. Ernie co-founded what was initially called the Palm Springs Classic golf tournament, first played in 1960. In 1965, Ernie and others convinced Bob Hope to add his name to the tournament, thus creating the Bob Hope Desert Classic now known as the Humana Challenge. During the tournament's history, Ernie served as Classic president five times, met and befriended presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and Gerald R. Ford. When Arnold Palmer played in the inaugural 1960 tournament, he and Ernie formed what would become a lifelong friendship. Ernie was privileged to accompany Arnold on many memorable trips, one of which took them around the world. As Arnold told the Dunlevie family, "He was my buddy; we did it all." Ernie was instrumental in the establishment of the Eisenhower Medical Center and proudly served on the Eisenhower Medical Center's original board and received numerous awards and recognition for his life of charitable accomplishments. In 1950, Ernie married Taylor Bandlow and had four sons; they divorced in 1970. In 1971, Ernie met his beloved wife-to-be, Joy Nicholson. Ernie and Joy married in 1982, and they enjoyed a special and devoted love for each other for many wonderful years. Their shared love of travel led them on many memorable trips and cruises throughout the world, often with good friends. Ernie enjoyed skiing, a love of flying his own plane, sailing his boat to Catalina and spending time with his family. Ernie was an avid skier who owned one of the original condos at Manor Vail and was a founding member of Camp Robbers of Vail. He is survived by Joy, loving stepmother to his four sons, Jon, Scott (Bill Kelley), Michael (Anne), Geoffrey (Rhonda); six grandchildren, Ian, Rachel, Jack, Connor, Taylor Dunlevie and Cole Schamber; sister-in-law Sheila Stirling; brother-in-law Tony Nicholson; former daughter-in-law Donna; niece Shane Lalonde (Larry); and his beloved dog, Raffles. Ernie will always be remembered for being charming, gracious, friendly, having a fabulous sense of humor and sharp wit. Ernie was a remarkable human being who was loved and will be missed by all who knew him. A memorial service will be held in the Annenberg Auditorium at Eisenhower Medical Center on Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Eisenhower Medical Center or the Boys & Girls Club of the Coachella Valley.

Top 10 Reads at the Bookworm of Edwards

1. "We Are Called To Rise," by Laura McBride 2. "All The Light We Cannot See," by Anthony Doerr 3. "Boys In the Boat," by Daniel James Brown 4. "Clean Slate," by Martha Stewart 5. "Shark Wars," by Ernie Altbacker 6. "Butterfly Park," by Elly MacKay 7. "Wild," by Cheryl Strayed 8. "Girl on the Train," by Paula Hawkins 9. "Painter," by Peter Heller 10. "Land More Kind Than Home," by Wiley Cash

Vail Daily column: Thanks for support

How do we start to thank you all Our good and faithful friends For hugs and tears, for being there For love that never ends? You always have been there for us. You've been our strength, our glue. You've held us up through all of this And done all you could do. To those of you who fixed us meals Or sent a lovely card, Who flowers brought, who dried our tears And those who mowed our yard. We cannot thank you near enough For all your memories shared For pictures shown, for stories told For all the ways you cared. We love that you were such good sports And put a lot of thought Into wearing of the orange And the flowers you each brought. We love you all, each one of you Our gratitude knows no end. For hugs and tears and helping hands For you our faithful friends! Special thanks to a special few: Our beloved Kathy Olson — you are an angel here on earth and such a special part of our family. We can never thank you enough for your love, support and all the hard work you put forth on our behalf. We love you so much! Shaw Cancer Center — your love of and care for our Jo over the past 10 years goes beyond just medical care. You were her "other family" and got to know her intimately and cared for her so lovingly. Vail Valley Medical Center — it is so obvious how much you loved and cared about both of your cookie cart people! Your kindness will always be remembered and appreciated. Slifer, Smith and Frampton Real Estate — your respect for and support of Jo truly went beyond an employer/employee relationship. She loved and was so proud of being a part of your company and considered so very many of you not only colleagues but very dear friends. Thank you also for your support of our family in our loss and grief and for your patience with us as we work through moving out of our home of so many years. Father Rick Webster of Christ Church Anglican — your commitment and care for both Jo and Ernie and for the entire Brown family was so touching. Your dedication toward making Jo's memorial service perfect in every way was exactly what we needed, and resulted in a beautiful service remembered by all. Brooks Keith of the Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration — a true and faithful man of God. We cannot thank you enough for your love and support. You and your congregation gathered us in and loved us and worked your magic to make Jo's service beautiful and dignified while still welcoming and full of love. Eagle-Vail Metropolitan District — Jeff and Laura, thank you for your kindness and generosity. The Alpenrose and Chef Oliver — Jo would have loved the beautiful and delicious pastries you lovingly made. Everyone here is this valley is more than a friend … you are all family. The family of Jo Brown

Stautner, NFL hall of famer, dies

Ernie Stautner, an Eagle-Vail resident who is in the pro football Hall of Fame, died early Thursday morning after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. He was 80. Stautner was born April 20, 1925, in Germany to Joseph and Hedwig Streck Stautner. He and his family migrated to Albany, N.Y. when he was 3 years old. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II he enrolled at Boston College where he was a 4-year starter on the football team and captured All-New England and All-Catholic honors as a two-way tackle. In the 1950 NFL draft he was picked by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the second round. Ernie played his entire 14-year career with the Steelers and was elected to the Pro Bowl nine times. Despite the Steelers’ illustrious history, Stautner’s jersey – No. 70 – remains the only number ever retired by the organization. The Steelers never had a winning season during Stautner’s playing days. In 1969, his first year of eligibility, Ernie was inducted into the football Hall of Fame. In 1973 he was inducted into the Boston College Varsity Club Athletic Hall of Fame. A highly-regarded coach and defensive coordinator with the Dallas Cowboys from 1966 to 1988, he played a major role in two of that team’s Super Bowl championships. During his coaching days with the Cowboys, Stautner found himself facing the Steelers in two Super Bowls. “He hated the Steelers then,” Jill said with another laugh. “When he wanted a Super Bowl ring he didn’t like them too much.” Even though the Cowboys lost the two Super Bowl meetings with the Steelers, Stautner won two rings while coaching with the Cowboys in 1971 and 1978. “They love him in Pittsburgh and Dallas,” Jill said.He also served on the coaching staffs of the Pittsburgh Steelers, Washington Redskins, and Denver Broncos was has head coach of the Dallas Texans of the Arena League and the NFL Europe World Champion Frankfurt Galaxy. Even with his disease, Stautner’s wife, Jill, said her husband enjoyed the Steelers’ 21-10 Super Bowl win on Feb. 5. “Dan Rooney (Pittsburgh Steelers owner) called today and asked if Ernie got to see the game and I said ‘Yes, he enjoyed it very much.’” The Stautners have had a home in the Vail area since 1989. Jill said she and Ernie loved skiing the slopes around Vail.Stautner was preceded in death by his son, Joseph Robert Stautner, in 2001 and by his brother, Joseph Stautner. He is survived by his wife, Jill. Also surviving are his children, Teresa Stautner, Carol Stautner-Hinds, Greg Hinds, J. J. Stautner-Gora, Anthony Gora, Jordan Stautner and Emily Stautner; his sister, Hedwig Hoffman; and his grandchildren Zachary, Danielle, Alex, Jodie, Joseph and Rachel. A visitation will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday at Mulkey-Mason Funeral Home in Lewisville, Texas, which can be reached at (972)436-4581. Funeral Mass will be held at 1 p.m., Monday at St. Phillip the Apostle Catholic Church in Lewisville. Private graveside service will be held at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Rowlette. Glenwood Springs correspondent Dale Shrull contributed to this report. Vail, Colorado

Frampton wins Vail Valley Foundation volunteer award

VAIL, COLORADO ” One of the Vail Valley’s stalwart and most recognizable front line volunteers will be recognized for her efforts Friday evening, as Susan Frampton is honored by the Vail Valley Foundation as the 2007 Ernie Bender Award for Volunteer of the Year. The award, now in its eighth year, will be presented at the annual Black Diamond Ball, in conjunction with the Charles Schwab Birds of Prey Men’s World Cup Week festivities. The award is named for the dedicated long-time race crew volunteer who passed away in the summer of 2000. “Volunteers are truly the backbone of the Vail Valley Foundation,” explained Foundation president Ceil Folz, “and we are incredibly fortunate to have such committed and selfless people like Susan as an integral part of all of our events. In addition to the time and expertise that she brings to our programs, she is incredibly vested in the well being of this community through all of her volunteer activities.” Originally from Beaufort, South Carolina, Frampton and husband Harry moved to the Vail Valley in 1982 when Harry was named president of Vail Associates. Susan immediately immersed herself as a volunteer in the Foundation’s fledgling programs, working registration for the inaugural AEI World Forum. “Harry and I have had some wonderful experiences that have come through the World Forum,” Frampton said. “We’ve had the opportunity to meet some incredible people over the years, but probably the most entertaining moment was the evening we hosted a small dinner for some of the participants and spent the majority of the night watching the O.J. Simpson chase on TV.” Frampton has volunteered for every World Forum since the outset and has only missed two of the 25 American Ski Classic events. Along with her annual Foundation volunteer responsibilities, she also served as the chairman of the Social Committee for both the 1989 and 1999 World Alpine Ski Championships. “I think my favorite memories of the Foundation’s events have come from my Social Committee work with the 1989 and 1999 World Championships,” Frampton said. “It was really rewarding, not to mention fun, to meet all the athletes and coaches, as well as everyone else that makes those events truly special.” In addition to her volunteer work for the Vail Valley Foundation, Frampton also serves as the chairman of the Resource Center of Eagle County, while also sitting on the boards of both the Family Learning Center and the Vail Art in Public Places Committee. A schoolteacher in South Carolina, she has been a volunteer teacher for over 10 years at Red Sandstone Elementary School and a six-year board member for Vail Mountain School. “This is a huge honor for me,” Frampton concluded. “I think the Vail Valley Foundation does such wonderful things for this community and I love working with the staff there. The creativity that comes out of the Foundation is amazing.” Frampton will join previous Ernie Bender Volunteer of the Year Award winners that include the Bender Family (2000), Dave Ozawa (2001), Barbara Treat (2002), Dick Pownall (2003), Bill Douglas (2004), Tenie Chicoine (2005) and Fred Haslee and Jim Sanders (2006). The Ernie Bender Volunteer of the Year Award is a project of the Vail Valley Foundation. For additional information on the Foundation, contact 949-1999 or visit http://www.vvf.org.

Frampton gets volunteer award Friday night

VAIL, Colorado “Longtime local Susan Frampton has won the Vail Valley Foundation’s Ernie Bender Award for her volunteer work. Frampton and her husband, Harry, moved to the Vail Valley from Beaufort, S.C., in 1982. Susan began a volunteer for some of the foundation’s fledgling programs, such as the AEI World Forum. The award will be given to Frampton at Friday night’s Black Diamond Ball, which is held each year in conjunction with the Birds of Prey World Cup ski races at Beaver Creek. “Harry and I have had some wonderful experiences that have come through the World Forum,” Frampton said. “We’ve had the opportunity to meet some incredible people over the years, but probably the most entertaining moment was the evening we hosted a small dinner for some of the participants and spent the majority of the night watching the O.J. Simpson chase on TV.” Frampton has volunteered for every World Forum since the outset and has only missed two of the 25 American Ski Classics. She also served as the chairman of the social committee for both the 1989 and 1999 World Alpine Ski Championships. Frampton also is chairman of the Resource Center of Eagle County and is on the boards of the Family Learning Center and the Vail Art in Public Places Committee. She has been a volunteer teacher for over 10 years at Red Sandstone Elementary School and a six-year board member for Vail Mountain School. Frampton will join previous Ernie Bender Volunteer of the Year Award winners that include the Bender Family (2000), Dave Ozawa (2001), Barbara Treat (2002), Dick Pownall (2003), Bill Douglas (2004), Tenie Chicoine (2005) and Fred Haslee and Jim Sanders (2006). For more information on the Vail Valley Foundation, call 949-1999 or visit http://www.vvf.org.