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Circus tricks, comedy, hockey, BBQ and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 1/17/20

Circus acts and comedy at the Vilar

This week brings thrilling acrobatics and comedy to the stage of the Vilar Performing Arts Center with Cirque Mechanics and Tom Papa.

Cirque Mechanics returns to the Vilar on Saturday at 7 p.m. with its newest production, “42FT – A Menagerie of Mechanical Marvels.” The number 42 signifies the size of the ring in this one-ring circus filled with amazing acrobats, aerialists and strongmen. Chris Lashua created Cirque Mechanics in 2004 after collaborating with the Circus Center of San Francisco on the show “Birdhouse Factory.” After its success, Lashua created this company that has since produced shows like “Boomtown” and “Pedal Punk.”

The Vilar Performing Arts Center provides the perfect venue to see the aerials and acrobatic feats up close. Tickets are $68 for adults and $48 for children. The show is part of the Pay Your Age ticket program (18-30 years old) and also included in the ticket package Pick 3 Shows for $90, Pick 5 Shows for $175 or Pick 8 Shows for $240. Tickets are available now at the Vilar box office, by calling 970-845-8497 or by going online to the website: www.vilarpac.org.

On Sunday at 7 p.m., enjoy the comedy of Tom Papa. Based out of Los Angeles, Papa travels to perform stand up comedy across the nation when he’s not busy on the airwaves. Papa contributes to NPR’s “Live from Here” and “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me” and also hosts podcasts including SiriusXM’s “Come to Papa,” featuring guests like Mel Brooks, Ray Romano and Jerry Seinfeld.

“If you don’t know Tom Papa, he’s got an awesome, smart and clean sense of humor, a lot like Jim Gaffigan,” said Ruthie Hamrick, senior marketing manager for the Vilar Performing Arts Center. “I’m super excited about this show.”

Tickets are $48 and can be purchased at the box office, website or by calling the box office.

Vail Yeti Hockey

Semi-pro hockey returns to Vail with the Vail Yeti hockey team hitting the ice once again this weekend. Dobson Ice Arena plays host to the home team as well as many top teams across the nation.

Last weekend, the Yeti were matched up against the New York Fire Department hockey team and squeezed out a win on Friday during an exciting third period and lost to FDNY on Saturday. This weekend is rivalry weekend, with the Yeti taking on the Breckenridge Vipers.

In their seventh season, the Yeti has grown in popularity among loyal fans and as a destination for quality hockey teams from out of town. Regionally, the Yeti not only compete against Breckenridge but also teams from Aspen, Boulder and Denver.

“The games are usually high intensity, high hitting and high scoring affairs. At $10 for a general admission ticket, its cheap entertainment in an expensive valley,” said Bill Foster, who is the Yeti coach and also a player on the team. Coach Foster gives us some info on the roster:

Players to look out for:

Justin Elmore (leading goal scorer all 7 seasons) 

Kirk Golden (Vail local, 7 seasons professional in Europe) 

Brent Sands (professional Europe/SPHL) 

Andy Canzanello (11 years professional AHL/DEL) 

Derrick Gerhardt (Vail local, 7th season with the Yeti) 

Matt Merritt (Vail local, Gustavus Adolphus Division 3 college hockey)

Spencer Gold (starting goalie)

Newcomers: 

Dom Panetta (Ferris State Division 1 college hockey)

Casey Kleisinger (Vail local, Air Force Academy Division 1 college hockey) 

Dave Ramsay (Williams College Division 3 college hockey)

The Yeti’s success has attracted talented players from the American Hockey League, which is the direct feeder league to the NHL, professional leagues in Europe and Australia as well as top college teams.

“W“We are taking this upcoming weekend to get prepared and really dialed in. We have a challenging five-week stretch approaching with teams from Texas, New England, New Jersey, Denver and Minnesota,” said six-year veteran of the Yeti team, Brent Sands. “These teams are stacked with hockey players, not just guys that play hockey. We need to be ready and we can’t take any team lightly.” 

The puck drops at 7:45 p.m. at Dobson Arena in Vail Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 years of age and younger. For more information, visit www.vailyetihockey.com.

First Tracks at Beaver Creek

You may have heard about people getting first tracks, which can either mean you were fortunate enough to get in line before everyone else to get some unforgettable turns, or first tracks is also an offering on Vail And Beaver Creek that is reserved for members of Vail Resorts Signature Clubs or donors to a particular group like the Vail Valley Foundation. Now, you can be a part of First Tracks at Beaver Creek on select dates throughout the season.

This Sunday, meet other early risers in your group at the Centennial Express lift at 7:15 a.m. Beaver Creek will have its top ski and snowboard professionals greeting you and letting you in on their top terrain recommendations for the morning excursion.

If you’re lucky, maybe you’ll time your First Tracks experience on a powder day, but even if there’s no fresh snow, the feeling of being the only one out there, even on the corduroy, is an experience all its own.

After you’ve taken a few runs with your guides and have worked up an appetite, you’ll be led down to Allie’s Cabin. This on-mountain restaurant is on the eastern hillside, just off of the Gold Dust trail and above the Haymeadow Express Gondola. The Allie’s Cabin culinary team will welcome your group with an amazing breakfast spread.  

Adult tickets are priced at $160 per person with children 12 and under priced at $80 per person. You will still need a pass or a day lift ticket to access the mountain. Advanced reservations are required, please call 970-754-5310 or visit www.beavercreek.com. If you miss First Tracks this Sunday, you can still aim to get out there at the crack of dawn on Jan. 26 or Feb. 16 and 23.

Beaver Creek Uphill and Skimo race

New for 2020, the Vail Recreation District brings their winter race series to Beaver Creek for the first time this season with an uphill and skimo competition at Arrowhead.

The Beaver Creek Uphill and Skimo is the first event in the Vail Grail Winter Race Series. The Vail Grail is a championship series consisting of three winter events: the new Beaver Creek Uphill and Skimo, an uphill at Vail Mountain and a snowshoe shuffle. Participants can sign up for one, two or all three races. Racers who complete all three races have a shot at winning the coveted Vail Grail, a permanent trophy that will bear the male and female division winners’ names for years to come. Athletes wishing to participate in all events and compete for the Vail Grail can sign up for the full series for a discounted rate of $85.

Competitors can choose the uphill or skimo (ascent and descent) option and can use any means to get up the mountain (snowshoes, skis, splitboards or winter running devices). Skis or a snowboard are required to compete in the skimo competition.

Participants will ascend approximately 1,700 vertical feet and just under two miles from the base of Arrowhead Village to the top of Arrow Bahn Express Lift. The event will conclude with breakfast and awards at Broken Arrow Restaurant at the base of Arrowhead. 

Online registration is available prior to race day at vailrec.com/register. Day-of registration and bib pick up will be available at Broken Arrow in Arrowhead Village prior to the race starting at 6 a.m. Race entry fees are $35 through Saturday and $45 on the day of the race. 

BBQ at the Westin’s Gondola Plaza

If you’re riding the Riverfront Express gondola toward the end of the day on Saturday and smell barbecue instead of the flavors of Mexican food from Maya, it’s because The Westin Riverfront is hosting a special après-ski barbecue next to the gondola on Saturday.

Held on The Westin Riverfront’s Gondola Plaza, the party will feature a delicious array of barbecue favorites including smoked pork, brisket and chicken all cooked up in a big smoker that will be outside for the event.

“We wanted to create a fun new event where both locals and Vail Valley guests can enjoy our delicious food and drinks after a great day on the mountain,” said Kevin Delonay, director of food and beverage at The Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa.

“While we are known for our delicious Mexican food, it is always nice to change things up and serve different dishes, and of course we all like to be outside to bask in our gorgeous Beaver Creek views,” Delonay said.

Wash down all the barbecue flavors with drink specials like $3 Colorado draft beers and $5 margaritas. Guests can enjoy live music by The Evolution, who play a wide variety of modern tunes, including rock & roll and Caribbean sounds. This weekend celebration will happen between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.

Don’t forget to Seize the Summit at Maya this ski season. Simply show that you reached 15,000 vertical feet during your day on the mountain and receive a free house margarita in Maya or a draft beer or house glass of wine in The Lift from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

There will be tables and chairs outside and seating near the fire pits, but if you do get cold, hop into Maya, where they pour more than 150 agave-based spirits and house-infused tequilas. Maya offers complimentary valet parking for restaurant patrons. For more information, please visit www.westinriverfront.

Vendetta’s is more than pizza

Have you tried the cioppino at Vendetta’s, complete with sautéed calamari, mussels, shrimp, pan-seared scallops, two crab legs and lobster claws? How about the slowly braised veal shank osso buco? Or the famous pork chop with smoked Gouda sauce?

If you are wondering if I am talking about the wrong Vendetta’s or thinking, “Tricia, don’t you mean the Snow Pig or Willie’s White Room pizza slices at Vendetta’s? They don’t serve pork chops,” then you haven’t spent time in the original Vendetta’s, which has been around since 1983.

Many people don’t realize that just underneath the pizza bar there is a large dining room that people have been coming to for decades. “I grew up here and I can’t tell you how many times we get people who have said that they’ve lived here for years and didn’t know that Vendetta’s had a full-service restaurant downstairs,” said Jennifer Riddle, general manager and events coordinator of Vendetta’s Italian Restaurant & Pizza Bar.

But, once they find out about it, they keep coming back again and again.

“I see the same people every year, a couple of times a year, from all over the country and the world. They make sure they make Vendetta’s Restaurant a part of their vacation experience every time,” said general manager Shawn Meineke.

Not only do the patrons look familiar, but that staff does as well. Longtime local John “Popeye” Brennen started Vendetta’s.

“Many people don’t even know Popeye’s real name,” said Riddle, who is Popeye’s daughter. And how about the mayor of Vail, Dave Chapin (also known as “Bone” — they love nicknames at Vendetta’s), he’s a part-owner as well.

Good people and good food are what Vendetta’s is all about. Although the menu contains Italian fare, sous chef Joe Fellenz (simply known as Chef Joe) likes to get creative with the dishes. 

After traveling to Costa Rica, where Chef Joe tried a breakfast crepe with smoked Gouda on it, he tried figuring out ways to incorporate the cheese into the pork chop entree.

“I started adding whiskey, bacon and honey and the dry rub I use has about 15 ingredients. It meshes well with the sweetness and the savory side of the dish,” Fellenz said.

Add a deep-fried, roasted garlic mashed potato and a little salad on the side and you have what the wait staff and longtime patrons will tell you is the best dish on the menu.

“You can’t find pork chops like this in our valley,” Fellenz said.

Vendetta’s Restaurant recently renovated its downstairs. It still can hold the same number of people (you won’t believe how much space is downstairs: It’s great for hosting a big gathering like a rehearsal dinner or corporate event.) Look for new tables and chairs with a modern feel, new artwork on the walls and a new hue to brighten things up.

So, if you are looking for a slice of pizza, yes, Vendetta’s can handle that upstairs, but if you want to experience the fine dining side of this local landmark, head downstairs to the spacious and delicious restaurant below the bar. For more information, visit www.vendettasvail.com.

Bloody marys filled with everything but the kitchen sink

January 1 is known worldwide as New Years Day, but according to National Day Calendar (www.nationaldaycalendar.com), it’s also known as National Bloody Mary Day.

For decades, the bloody mary cocktail has been the go-to remedy for a hangover. Speaking of remedies, we stopped by Remedy Bar at the Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail to ask beverage director, Steven Teaver about some of his tips on making a great bloody mary.

“It can be a kitchen sink type of thing, you can add any spices, vegetables, you can change the base spirit from vodka to tequila to whiskey to whatever you’d like,” Teaver said.

Teaver sticks to a more neutral spirit like vodka, Breckenridge Vodka to be exact. “You want something that has been distilled properly and doesn’t have a lot of long-chain alcohols that take your liver a while to break down. You want a quality spirit for sure,” Teaver said.

Flavored and infused vodkas can be used as the base spirit as well and Teaver suggests you try making your own – with bacon. It’s a process called fat washing where you take bacon fat and place it into a two-inch deep baking tray or cake pan. Pour the vodka in there, cover it and let it sit at room temperature for several hours. Put it in the freezer, the fat will congeal and you strain that off. “I think bacon-flavored vodka works well with the savory aspect of the bloody mary,” Teaver said.

Next, add tomato juice, V-8 or a pre-made mix. Teaver likes to add fresh carrot juice or tomato water to really thin it out. “Take some tomatoes, preferably an heirloom, you can use baby heirlooms in the winter, puree the tomatoes in a blender and then run it through a very fine mesh sieve. It’s going to pull the solids out and then you have tomato water,” Teaver said.

“Fish sauce is great, too, if you’re a little adventurous and a little bit goes a long way.”

Spice it up with Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, Angostura bitters, horseradish, lemon, lime and season to taste with powdered garlic, Old Bay seasoning, fennel seed or caraway. What about adding espresso? View today’s video on www.vaildaily.com to learn more about how Teaver adds a jolt of caffeine and what else you can do to customize your bloody mary for National Bloody Mary Day.

Alpine & Antlers offers American classics with an artful twist

The new Alpine & Antlers restaurant in the Beaver Creek Lodge can take care of all your dining and drinking needs. Serving morning, noon and night, this eatery offers American classics with an artful twist.

Executive chef Sammy Shipman said their goal at Alpine & Antlers is to create a fun place where the menu is approachable, comfortable and shareable. “It’s kind of the opposite of what many of the restaurants at Beaver Creek have. At many places, there is a large tasting menu where you commit to several courses. We have a variety of shareable plates and entrees so you can order for what your needs are at the time,” Shipman said.

Alpine & Antlers has been in the making since July and Shipman, who’s been a chef in the valley for over 10 years, said it’s been fun to start a restaurant from scratch. “Many times you come into a restaurant where the menu is already established and you can’t change a lot of the dishes. Here, we had to develop every single part of everything, right down to which type of oil to use,” Shipman said.

We tried one of the seasonal favorites on the menu, the flaming saganaki, which is kasseri Greek cheese, brandy and lemon served with a sliced baguette. They light up the skillet right at the table, so have your camera ready. We also had the wood-roasted mussels. “We’re doing everything we can in our wood-fired oven or the wood-fired grill because you can pick up so much good flavor in there,” Shipman said.

Alpine & Antlers also has a drink menu featuring alpine-infused cocktails like the apple pie, which is a festive rye-based cocktail with allspice liqueur with a house-made apple shrub and a crushed graham cracker and gingersnap rim, which is sure to put you in the holiday spirit.

The breakfast menu is super-charged with power bowls and protein-packed classics like an egg white frittata and a whole grain rice bowl that’ll energize you for a day of skiing and snowboarding. Happy hour runs from 2 to 5 p.m. and they have live music Wednesdays through Fridays from 2 to 4 p.m. Check in with them about their New Year’s Eve party featuring Austin’s Rose.

Feed your curiosity at this funky new place to dine in Beaver Creek. Follow Alpine & Antlers on social media for more information and specials.

Executive chef Marco Fossati welcomes you to Four Seasons Vail

Most hotels have a lobby bar where you can gather before going out to dinner or wait for the rest of your party to come down before heading out and about. But at the Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail, the lobby bar is more of a destination. Even people who aren’t even staying at the hotel flock to enjoy the views, libations and delicious food at The Remedy Bar.

The Remedy Bar, the Four Seasons Vail’s lobby bar, has become a Vail favorite. Its big-screen televisions are a draw for sports enthusiasts looking for the big game. The drinks draw in those looking for a creative concoction and foodies love the diverse items on the menu. And everyone loves the views, including the Four Seasons Vail’s new executive chef, Marco Fossati.

“After spending 10 wonderful years in California, I think it was time to come to the mountains. When you sit in Remedy and that is the view, it’s just fantastic,” Fossati said while gesturing to the large windows that face the ski slopes of Vail Mountain.

Fossati was with the Four Seasons properties in Palo Alto and Santa Barbara, CA and the Four Seasons Hotel Milano in Italy. He also has spent his early years working at various establishments including luxury hotels, Michelin-starred restaurants and private clubs. He’s worked at amazing locations such as Tuscany, Milano, Sardinia, Paris, Hamburg and London.

Fossati’s energy is contagious. His warmth, spirit, Italian accent and desire to make you feel welcome give you the feeling that you are in his own home rather than at a restaurant. Fossati likes to share the experience with the guests and Remedy’s new open-air kitchen puts its culinary artistry on display.

He likes to pay attention to the small details as well. The honey drizzled over the signature grilled cheese comes from Knapp Ranch in Edwards. The micro herbs that top off the beetroot hummus are also from Knapp Ranch. Much of the bread that is on the menu comes from Hovey and Harrison in Edwards. “One of the owners at Hovey and Harrison is my neighbor, so sometimes we meet for coffee and chat about products we can use,” Fossati said.

Fossati said he’s excited to change the menu often and get creative by using local and regional ingredients. But first, he wants to hit the slopes. “It’s been over 20 years since I’ve skied, so on my next day off I am going to go up on the hill.”

Ski races, live music, libations and more during Birds of Prey weekend: Tricia’s weekend picks 12/6/19

Ski Racing 101

If you didn’t grow up ski racing, you may not know the difference between a tech event versus a speed event, but don’t worry, here’s a quick primer on what you’ll see this weekend at the Xfinity Birds of Prey Audi FIS Ski World Cup.

Disciplines

There are five disciplines, some are speed events, some are technical events. Many ski racers specialize in technical versus speed or the other way around. Some racers train for a combination of tech and speed events.

  • Slalom-this is a technical event with 56 to 70 gates spaced close together, testing the agility of a racer. The racers are traveling at slower speeds. The top 30 racers advance to the second run, which is called “making the flip”, with the fastest skier in the first race going out of the starting gate last on the second run. The skier with the lowest combined time from both runs wins.
  • Giant Slalom-or GS, a technical event that has the same amount of gates as the slalom, but the gates are spaced farther apart. Just like the slalom, this is a two-run format, with the top 30 racers advancing and the skier with the lowest combined time from both runs wins.
  • Super-G-this is a speed event with fewer gates over a longer course. There is only one run in super-G.
  • Downhill-this speed event has the least amount of gates and the fastest speeds of all of the disciplines. There is only one run in downhill.
  • Combined-this is a combination of a technical event and a speed event, with the lowest combined race time from each race winning the event.

Schedule:

  • Friday-super G – 10:45 a.m.
  • Saturday- downhill – 11 a.m.
  • Sunday – giant slalom-first run-9:45 a.m., second run-12:45 p.m.

By the Numbers:

  • 2,483 Feet-the Birds of Prey Course features a vertical drop of nearly 2,500 feet
  • 45%-the average gradient of the course is 27 %, increasing to 45 % in the middle of the course and again in the final third of the course
  • 1997-the first competition on Birds of Prey took place December 2-6, 1997
  • 1:39- the fastest World Cup or World Championships Downhill race time ever recorded on Birds of Prey is 1:39.59 by U.S. Ski Team’s Daron Rahlves in 2003
  • 2004- history was made with the one-two American downhill finish of Bode Miller and Daron Rahlves

Birds of Prey Way

Birds of Prey Way is the place to be before or after the races to meet up with friends, enjoy the live music, cheers to the day’s race results and get your groove on with the Silent Disco.

Silent Disco? If you haven’t heard of this type of party, don’t be shy, grab a pair of headphones and groove to your own sounds and dance like nobody’s watching. Each pair of headphones has a light that will indicate which song the person wearing them is listening to. So if you are feeling the beat and see someone else with the same colored light as you, go on over and dance next to them. Birds of Prey of a feather dance together. The Silent Disco, presented by TIAA Bank, will take place along Birds of Prey Way from 4 to 6 on Friday and is a free activity.

Kids love the excitement of watching the world’s fastest zoom down the hill. Some schools even take part of the day off to bring classes up to see the action and cheer on the racers. After the races, bring the kids to Beaver Creek Village for free ice skating from 4 to 6 p.m. on Friday. I’ve also heard that you can wear the Silent Disco headphones on the ice rink if you dare.

Kids can get up close and meet the racers at the U.S. Athlete Signing on Friday from 4 to 5 p.m. at Gorsuch in Beaver Creek Village. Bring a sharpie, take a selfie and have the athletes sign your helmet or anything else you want to keep as a memento.

After the silent disco, free ice skating and the autograph signing, stick around for fireworks at 6:15 p.m. After that, head down the escalators to the Vilar Performing Arts Center and view the latest Warren Miller film. A staple of the early part of the ski season, Warren Miller films have been a way for families to kick off the year for 70 years. Get inspired by the athletes featured in the films and the beautiful locations they travel to. This year’s film is called “Timeless” and there are three opportunities to see the film in the Vail Valley: Friday at 6:30 p.m., Saturday at 6 and 9 p.m. Get tickets and more information at www.worldcup.com.  

Live Music

Enjoy live music throughout the whole weekend on the main stage by the Black Family Ice Rink in Beaver Creek Village:

Friday

  • Drunken Hearts-2 to 3:45 p.m.
  • DJ Walt White and the Global DJ Team 4 to 6 p.m.

Saturday

  • Andy Thorn of Leftover Salmon and Mark Morris from Rapidgrass-9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
  • Whitacre-1 to 2:45 p.m.
  • Rocky Mountain Grateful Dead Review-3:15-5:45 p.m.

Sunday

  • Andy Thorn of Leftover Salmon and Mark Morris from Rapidgrass-8:45 to 9:45 a.m.

Lots o’ libations

Even though the weekend centers around the races, it is also a party to celebrate having a world cup on American soil (most of the season’s races are in Europe) and the kick-off to winter. Thus, let’s raise a glass, and there are plenty of opportunities to grab a drink throughout the weekend. The following bars and restaurants are offering these specials:

Hooked-Wild Tonic sampling and swag-12 to 6 p.m., $4.50 happy hour Wild Tonic cans 3 to 5 p.m. and Wild Tonic included in two of Hooked’s new Tiki drinks.

C Bar-$6.50 Svedka cocktails and $10 Robert Mondavi bourbon barrel-aged fume blanc or cabernet

Coyote Cafe-Svedka, Tincup Whiskey and Robert Mondavi specials all weekend

Dusty Boot-Happy Hour-3 to 5 p.m.

The Met-Happy Hour-3 to 5 p.m.

Bloodies, anyone? Bloody marys will be poured up for free before the races start on Saturday and Sunday. These bloodies will be served up with some bluegrass music as part of the Bloodies and Bluegrass offering that starts at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday and at 8:45 a.m. on Sunday.

Throughout the weekend, enjoy the Pumphouse Bar located in the center of Beaver Creek near the ice rink and a long Birds of Prey Way. They will be serving Pacifico beer, various spirits, wine, bubbles, and Wild Tonic, a hard Jun Kombucha that comes in different flavors. You may have tried a sample at last summer’s GoPro Mountain Games.

The Beers of Prey has become a regular part of the weekend, bringing in local, regional, national and even international breweries to Birds of Prey Way. “Colorado is no stranger to great brew festivals, but what sets this one apart is the amount of limited edition, seasonal and fan-favorite brews that the breweries bring in,” said Tom Boyd of the Vail Valley Foundation, the organization that produces the Birds of Prey races each year.

The fourth annual Beers of Prey event is presented by Ballast Point Brewing Company out of San Diego. This year’s event hosts 15 breweries:

  • 4 Noses Brewing Company
  • Ballast Point
  • Bonfire Brewing
  • Denver Beer Co.
  • Destihl Brewery
  • Eddyline Brewery
  • Great Divide
  • Holidaily Brewing Company
  • Lone Tree Brewing Company
  • New Belgium Brewing
  • Odell Brewing Company
  • Outer Range Brewing Company
  • Ska Brewing
  • Vail Brewing Company
  • Wild Tonic

Tickets are $35 and the event runs from 2-6 p.m. on Friday. PLEASE NOTE: After 7 p.m. on Friday, tickets will only be available for purchase on-site at the Vail Valley Foundation Booth near the Beaver Creek Ice Rink. New this year, the first 300 ticket buyers will receive a custom Beers of Prey OtterBox tumbler with their purchase. Tickets and more information can be found at www.bcworldcup.com.

How to get there

How do you get to all the fun? Park in the Elk Lot or Bear Lot for $10. Please note that these lots are free after 1 p.m. if you are just going up for the festivities after the races. Regularly scheduled free shuttles will bring spectators from the lots to the Vilar Performing Arts Center and Birds of Prey Way expo area. Free race shuttles depart from the Covered Bridge, every five to ten minutes. Please note that as of press time, there is no skiing or snowboarding access to the finish area. However, skiers and riders will be able to bring their gear on the buses and leave the finish area via Birds of Prey Express (Lift No. 9) on skis and boards.

If you are staying in the hotels in Avon or are taking public transportation to Beaver Creek, then transfer from that bus to the buses at the covered bridge to get to the race venue.

Feeling ambitious? You can snowshoe up to the race venue on the Dally catwalk from the base of Beaver Creek Village.

Once you get there, you still have a five-minutes of stairs and an on-snow walk to Red Tail Stadium, so wear appropriate footwear. (Ladies, no heels unless they are wedge boots). Please allow one hour of travel time from the base of Beaver Creek to Red Tail Stadium to avoid missing any of the action. ADA access to the venue is available on request. Please contact Birds of Prey Registration at 970.748.5901.

Bookworm hosts cookbook author Jennie Iverson for Friendsgiving brunch event

Some places are known for their activities, some for their food. Ski towns typically are known for both. Jennie Iverson is working to bring that special ski town flavor off the slopes and into your home.

Join Iverson at the Bookworm in Edwards for a Friendsgiving brunch, catered by Tracy Miller of Colorful Cooking and the Bookworm Café. Tickets are $75 and include the brunch and a copy of Iverson’s new cookbook, “Ski Town Brunch.”

Iverson has had a passion for food for as long as she can remember. 

“Living to eat is definitely a Jennie-motto,” Iverson said. “I actually have a theory that my taste bud chemistry might be different than others; I can decipher nuances in foods and relish my eating rituals more than any other person I know.”

Despite this, Iverson didn’t set out to have a career in food; in college, while pursuing a degree in engineering, she would take study breaks by pouring through cookbooks in the library. But as she graduated, traveled and skied around the world, an idea began to form. 

“I had been pondering how I could combine a love of travel, eating and skiing into a business model, and voila: “Ski Town Soups” was born,” Iverson said. 

Soon enough, people began to jump at the opportunity to bring a little bite of their vacation home with them. 

“I believe that everyone that lives in or visits a ski town loves to reminisce about their travels, so a keepsake was in order,” she said.

But if she truly wanted to make her cookbook a hit for everyone, it couldn’t just be about the ski towns she personally loved. 

“Of course, all skiers love different mountain towns,” Iverson said. “I had to make it wide and inclusive, and full of that ski town feeling. It’s fun to page through the cookbooks and almost use them as travel guides to plan your next excursion.”

“Ski Town Soups” was such a success, Iverson followed it up with “Ski Town Apres Ski,” filled with recipes to enjoy after a full day on the snow. Now, the third cookbook is available to satisfy those lazy, snowy morning cravings. “Ski Town Brunch” features savory and sweet brunch dishes from 65 of the top North American ski resorts as well as legendary cafes and charming bed and breakfasts. 

“The recipe that I was stoked to get, besides the awesome and beyond scrumptious Julia Child from The Bookworm, was the Lemon Souffle Pancakes from The Little Nell in Aspen,” Iverson said. “This is one of their most notable and popular dishes, and I was beside myself when they shared!”

For those of us that drool over the pages of delicious new recipes and are always hungry for more, there is now a box set of all three cookbooks just waiting to take a place on the kitchen shelf called “Ski Town Kitchen.”

“I created these cookbooks to be read, which is what I like,” Iverson explains. “They are very visual, understandable for the home cook and rated by difficulty. I feel the success of these cookbooks stem from the fact that I am actually the intended audience.”

If you go …

What: Friendsgiving Brunch

When: Thursday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

Where: The Bookworm of Edwards

Cost: $75 for brunch and a copy of “Ski Town Brunch”

More information: Limited seating is available. Call the Bookworm at 970-926-7323 or visit bookwormofedwards.com for more information.

Ski Town Brunch shares recipes from North America’s top resorts

Thanksgiving is coming early to the Bookworm of Edwards. The Riverwalk bookstore and cafe has teamed up with Ski Town Life, the creators of the “Ski Town Soups,” “Ski Town Après” and “Ski Town Brunch” cookbook series authored by Vail resident, Jennie Iverson. Some of the recipes from Iverson’s latest cookbook, “Ski Town Brunch” will be featured at a Friendsgiving event this week.

The “Ski Town” series showcases recipes from North America’s ski resorts. This coffee table-worthy cookbook could also serve as a travel guide and a keepsake with beautiful photos from legendary cafes, spectacular resorts and charming bed and breakfasts.

When Iverson started thinking about doing a cookbook, she pondered how she could combine a love of travel, eating and skiing into a business model. The latest cookbook, “Ski Town Brunch,” features savory and sweet brunch dishes from 65 top North American ski resorts. “I actually conduct a pretty thorough search of places to feature and have researched and visited most of the big North American resorts that are included,” Iverson said. 

Living to travel may be one thing for Iverson, but living to eat is certainly another. “I have always had a passion for food. I have this theory that my taste bud chemistry might be different than others,” Iverson said. “I can decipher nuances in foods and relish my eating rituals more than any other person I know.” 

Enjoy some of the tasty recipes in “Ski Town Brunch” at Friendsgiving on Thursday with two seatings at 9 and 10:30 a.m. The menu features savory and sweet dishes from the cookbook along with baked goods, hand-crafted espresso drinks, smoothies and more. Tracy Miller of Colorful Cooking will make the buffet in Bookworm’s kitchen and Iverson will be selling and signing cookbooks.

Seating is limited and tickets available for $75, which includes brunch and the cookbook. For more information about the cookbook, go to www.skitownlife.com and for more information on the Friendsgiving brunch, visit www.bookwormofedwards.com.

Learn more about the granola from Cafe Genevieve from Jackson Hole, WY. Iverson shares the recipe and how to make it in today’s video.

Ingredients

1 cup Vital Farms butter

½ vanilla bean

½ cup Vermont Sticky maple syrup

7 cups of old fashioned oats

½ teaspoon Kosher salt

1/3 cup oil

2 ½ cups coconut, sweetened and shredded

1 ¼ cup dried cranberries

¾ cup dried apricots

¾ cup dried peaches

In a medium saucepan, melt the @vitalfarms butter and scrape vanilla seed into butter then throw the entire seed into butter. Cook on medium, stirring frequently until butter is golden. Off the heat, add @vermontsticky maple syrup and oil to saucepan. Combine oats, coconut, salt and the melted vanilla syrup butter in large bowl until evenly coated. Spread out on 2 baking sheets and bake at 325 degrees until golden brown. (Rotate and toss granola mid-way through baking). Remove from oven and let cool. Add dried fruit and then enjoy immediately or store in an airtight container for future enjoyment.

Vail Mountain opens, bells ring for après-ski, holiday ornament painting and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/15/2019

Vail’s Opening Day & Vail Après ringing of the bells

We’ve been watching ski resorts open over the pass in Summit County and now it’s Eagle County’s turn to start spinning the lifts. Vail will open for its 57th season with approximately 91 acres of terrain, up from the originally announced acreage of 70 acres of terrain accessed via Gondola One in Vail Village starting at 9 a.m. on Friday.

New for this season, Vail will open skiing and riding out of Vail Village, with upload and download access to the Mid-Vail area via Gondola One (1). The resort will offer skiing and riding terrain for all ability levels on trails accessed by Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) out of Mid-Vail including Swingsville, Ramshorn, Slifer Express, Cappuccino, Upper Powerline, Lower Meadows.

Beginner terrain will be available at the base of Golden Peak with Gopher Hill Lift (#12) and Sherry’s Carpet (#33) open. The connector trail between Golden Peak and Vail Village will connect the two base areas.

If you hiked up the Berry Picker trail this summer, you noticed the pipes and trenches as Vail was prepping the mountain for more snowmaking capabilities. That has resulted in nearly 200 acres of new and enhanced snowmaking terrain this season, in addition to the previously existing 431 acres of snowmaking terrain.

Vail will continue to make snow across the mountain at every opportunity as weather and conditions permit, and look to expand open terrain as soon as possible.

As part of the Opening Day festivities, Beth Howard, Vail Mountain’s vice president and chief operating officer, along with snowmaking project leaders will perform a celebratory ribbon cutting on one of Vail’s new state-of-the-art snow guns at the base of Gondola One at 8:30 a.m.

Complimentary breakfast burritos and hot cocoa will be provided in Mountain Plaza at the base of Gondola One for early risers on opening day, while supplies last. If you don’t get there in time for the free burritos, Express Lift Bar will be open in Mountain Plaza as well. For dining options on the mountain, Look Ma at Mid-Vail and Buffalo’s at the top of Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) will be fully operational starting at 9 a.m.

Après-ski bell ringing

The start of the ski season also kicks off après-ski. Après-ski is French for “after ski” and it can be likened to happy hour after work. To take après ski up a notch and pay homage to the European ski areas, Vail will kick off Vail Après at 2:45 p.m. Friday with a ceremonial bell ringing on Pepi’s deck.

Sheika Gramshammer and her family, owners of Gastof Gramshammer and Pepi’s Bar & Restaurant will be joined by dignitaries from the town of Vail and Vail Mountain to kick off the inaugural Vail Après bell ringing and celebrate the start of Vail’s ski season.

To join in the celebration, members of the community are encouraged to gather on Pepi’s deck at 2:45 p.m. on Friday to take part in a ceremony that will launch this new tradition.

Following Friday’s launch, Vail Après will take place daily at 3 p.m. throughout the season with simultaneous bell ringing throughout Vail Village, Lionshead and on Vail Mountain to signify the beginning of après-ski.

For information about opening day in Vail go to www.vail.com. For details on Vail Après or information on custom bell orders, visit www.vail.com/apres.

Tales of the 10th

We just observed and thanked vets on Monday for Veterans Day, but this Friday you can learn quite a bit more about the famed 10th Mountain Division, the winter warfare unit that trained just south of Vail at Camp Hale before fighting battles in Europe during World War II. Acclaimed author and historian Maurice Isserman will give a 90-minute presentation beginning at 3 p.m.

The presentation coincides with the publication of Isserman’s new book, “The Winter Army: The World War II Odyssey of the 10th Mountain Division, America’s Elite Alpine Warriors.” The 10th Mountain Division is known for breaking down the last line of German defenses in the Italian Alps in 1945, which was instrumental in leading the Allies to victory.

Isserman has poured over letters and diaries written during battle. This material has never been published before and Isserman brings the voices of these soldiers to life.

Seating at the Colorado Snowsports Museum is limited, with a maximum capacity of 30 participants. A $5 to $10 donation per person is suggested. Please call 970-476-1876 in advance for availability. To learn more about the Colorado Snowsports Museum visit www.snowsportsmuseum.org.

Cocktails and Canvas: Ornament Painting

Get a jump on holiday decorating by creating your own ornaments at Cocktails and Canvas: Ornament Painting this Friday at 6:30 p.m. in Lionshead. Make a set of round glass ornaments, perfect for holiday decorations and handmade gifts. The Alpine Arts Center provides all materials and step-by-step instructions. Wine and beer can be purchased for those ages 21 and older at the event.

Paint a snowman, a wintery scene or do something more abstract. It’s all up to you and what inspires you at the time. You don’t need to be an artist to do this project, either. It’s all about having fun and getting into the holiday spirit.

This event takes place at the Vail Recreation District community programming room (second floor of Lionshead Parking Garage above the Welcome Center). Parking is free after 3 p.m. The class is being offered at the discounted rate of $20 per person due to sponsorship from the town of Vail and Alpine Bank. To register, go to www.alpineartscenter.org.

Vail Performing Arts Academy presents “Broadway Stars”

Feel like you’ve traveled to New York City with the songs of Broadway filling the stage as the students from the Vail Performing Arts Academy’s present “Broadway Stars”, a revue featuring performances of Broadway hits.

Audiences will be entertained by students ages 8 to 18 who will be singing numbers from “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,” “Seussical The Musical,” “Anastasia,” “The Addams Family,” “Hairspray,” “Be More Chill,” “Matilda,” “Billie Elliot,” “Beetlejuice” and more.

Even though these performers are students, the acting, singing, costumes and set design are all top-notch. Annah Scully, executive producer of the Vail Performing Arts Academy, surrounds herself with professionals like Colin Meiring, artistic director; Melinda Carlson, vocal coach; Maria Barry, assistant choreographer and Val Watts, costumer. There are also technicians who help with logistics and countless parents and volunteers who really help each child’s experience live up to the Vail Performing Arts Academy’s slogan: The Most Important Stage in a Child’s Life.

Speaking of stages, the students get to perform on a stage that has seen the likes of B.B. King, Ringo Starr and Jay Leno. “Broadway Stars” will be hosted at the Vilar Performing Arts Center Saturday and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 for reserved seating. Call 970-845-8497 or visit www.vilarpac.org. To learn more about the Vail Performing Arts Academy, visit www.vpaa.org.

Epic Mountain Express Fill the Van food drive

On Saturday, Epic Mountain Express will be hosting the 22nd annual Fill the Van event across our mountain communities. Fill the Van is the largest single food drive across the mountain region, with donated food going directly to local food banks.

Chances are you need to grab some groceries this week, so why not wait and shop on Saturday during the food drive and pick up some extra non-perishable items, put them in a separate bag at checkout and drop them off on your way out of the store. Epic Mountain Express makes it easy for you to help our neighbors in need.

Collection locations will be set up all throughout Eagle County and beyond. Look for the teams next to the colorful Epic Mountain Express vans between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the following locations:

Eagle County locations:

  • City Market – Vail
  • City Market – Avon
  • City Market – Eagle
  • Safeway – Vail
  • Wal-Mart – Eagle-Vail
  • Village Market – Edwards        

Summit County locations:

  • Safeway – Frisco 
  • City Market – Dillon
  • City Market – Breckenridge

Roaring Fork Valley locations:

  • City Market – Glenwood
  • City Market – El Jebel

Walking Mountains Film Series starts Wednesday

Walking Mountains Science Center will host its eighth annual Sustainable Film Series on a new night and at a new venue. The Riverwalk Theater in Edwards will host films each month on Wednesday nights from now until April. Walking Mountains had been showing the same film upvalley and downvalley each month. With a centralized location, the series will now host one movie per month in an actual theater.

“When we were looking for a new venue, we reached out to Grant Smith from the Riverwalk Theater, and he was interested, said Melissa Kirr, senior programs director of sustainability for Walking Mountains. We decided that by moving to a centrally located spot in the valley, we could combine the two film nights into one. We are very excited to be able to have everyone in one place.”

Smith is excited to host. “This aligns with our mission to really have the Riverwalk Theater be involved with the community. We are happy to host locals and visitors and bring some great films to the big screen,” Smith said.

Kirr sources the films from all over the globe, reviewing flicks that are out on the festival circuit and checking in with film publishers and promoters.

“I try to find a variety of sustainability topics so that everyone can find an interest. I always take recommendations from community members, too,” Kirr said.

The topics center around energy, waste, natural resources, climate change, sustainable food, sustainable tourism and sustainable communities and lifestyles.

On Wednesday, Walking Mountains will kick off the series with “Paris to Pittsburgh.”

“This film focuses on how Americans are demanding and creating real solutions around climate change. This hits home as the community continues to meet goals created by the local climate action plan,” Kirr said.

She is also looking forward to “The Wild” film in March.

“This is the third film that we have shown since we started the film series on the Pebble Mine and Bristol Bay in Alaska. I had the chance to see this film at a festival recently, and it is really impactful,” Kirr said. “We always partner with Kaleb’s Katch to share these films, and he always ends up bringing some tasty salmon appetizers.”

Speaking of food, the Riverwalk Theater can take care of dinner for you right at the theater. They serve more than just popcorn. Try the pizzas from Village Bagel or gourmet hot dogs from Colorado Meat Co. Come early and enjoy happy hour specials on beer and wines by the glass from 3-6 p.m. (Yes, when Smith took over the Riverwalk Theater, he also brought in the adult beverages.)

In addition to a new night and new venue, Walking Mountains will also bring in a few directors from the films and outdoor apparel company Fjallraven will be giving away an item at each event. 

Walking Mountain’s goal for this series is to provoke thought and create action, so take part in the opportunity to learn at this free monthly film series. For dates and more on each film visit walkingmountains.org.