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Vail Mountain opens, bells ring for après-ski, holiday ornament painting and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/15/2019

Vail’s Opening Day & Vail Après ringing of the bells

We’ve been watching ski resorts open over the pass in Summit County and now it’s Eagle County’s turn to start spinning the lifts. Vail will open for its 57th season with approximately 91 acres of terrain, up from the originally announced acreage of 70 acres of terrain accessed via Gondola One in Vail Village starting at 9 a.m. on Friday.

New for this season, Vail will open skiing and riding out of Vail Village, with upload and download access to the Mid-Vail area via Gondola One (1). The resort will offer skiing and riding terrain for all ability levels on trails accessed by Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) out of Mid-Vail including Swingsville, Ramshorn, Slifer Express, Cappuccino, Upper Powerline, Lower Meadows.

Beginner terrain will be available at the base of Golden Peak with Gopher Hill Lift (#12) and Sherry’s Carpet (#33) open. The connector trail between Golden Peak and Vail Village will connect the two base areas.

If you hiked up the Berry Picker trail this summer, you noticed the pipes and trenches as Vail was prepping the mountain for more snowmaking capabilities. That has resulted in nearly 200 acres of new and enhanced snowmaking terrain this season, in addition to the previously existing 431 acres of snowmaking terrain.

Vail will continue to make snow across the mountain at every opportunity as weather and conditions permit, and look to expand open terrain as soon as possible.

As part of the Opening Day festivities, Beth Howard, Vail Mountain’s vice president and chief operating officer, along with snowmaking project leaders will perform a celebratory ribbon cutting on one of Vail’s new state-of-the-art snow guns at the base of Gondola One at 8:30 a.m.

Complimentary breakfast burritos and hot cocoa will be provided in Mountain Plaza at the base of Gondola One for early risers on opening day, while supplies last. If you don’t get there in time for the free burritos, Express Lift Bar will be open in Mountain Plaza as well. For dining options on the mountain, Look Ma at Mid-Vail and Buffalo’s at the top of Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) will be fully operational starting at 9 a.m.

Après-ski bell ringing

The start of the ski season also kicks off après-ski. Après-ski is French for “after ski” and it can be likened to happy hour after work. To take après ski up a notch and pay homage to the European ski areas, Vail will kick off Vail Après at 2:45 p.m. Friday with a ceremonial bell ringing on Pepi’s deck.

Sheika Gramshammer and her family, owners of Gastof Gramshammer and Pepi’s Bar & Restaurant will be joined by dignitaries from the town of Vail and Vail Mountain to kick off the inaugural Vail Après bell ringing and celebrate the start of Vail’s ski season.

To join in the celebration, members of the community are encouraged to gather on Pepi’s deck at 2:45 p.m. on Friday to take part in a ceremony that will launch this new tradition.

Following Friday’s launch, Vail Après will take place daily at 3 p.m. throughout the season with simultaneous bell ringing throughout Vail Village, Lionshead and on Vail Mountain to signify the beginning of après-ski.

For information about opening day in Vail go to www.vail.com. For details on Vail Après or information on custom bell orders, visit www.vail.com/apres.

Tales of the 10th

We just observed and thanked vets on Monday for Veterans Day, but this Friday you can learn quite a bit more about the famed 10th Mountain Division, the winter warfare unit that trained just south of Vail at Camp Hale before fighting battles in Europe during World War II. Acclaimed author and historian Maurice Isserman will give a 90-minute presentation beginning at 3 p.m.

The presentation coincides with the publication of Isserman’s new book, “The Winter Army: The World War II Odyssey of the 10th Mountain Division, America’s Elite Alpine Warriors.” The 10th Mountain Division is known for breaking down the last line of German defenses in the Italian Alps in 1945, which was instrumental in leading the Allies to victory.

Isserman has poured over letters and diaries written during battle. This material has never been published before and Isserman brings the voices of these soldiers to life.

Seating at the Colorado Snowsports Museum is limited, with a maximum capacity of 30 participants. A $5 to $10 donation per person is suggested. Please call 970-476-1876 in advance for availability. To learn more about the Colorado Snowsports Museum visit www.snowsportsmuseum.org.

Cocktails and Canvas: Ornament Painting

Get a jump on holiday decorating by creating your own ornaments at Cocktails and Canvas: Ornament Painting this Friday at 6:30 p.m. in Lionshead. Make a set of round glass ornaments, perfect for holiday decorations and handmade gifts. The Alpine Arts Center provides all materials and step-by-step instructions. Wine and beer can be purchased for those ages 21 and older at the event.

Paint a snowman, a wintery scene or do something more abstract. It’s all up to you and what inspires you at the time. You don’t need to be an artist to do this project, either. It’s all about having fun and getting into the holiday spirit.

This event takes place at the Vail Recreation District community programming room (second floor of Lionshead Parking Garage above the Welcome Center). Parking is free after 3 p.m. The class is being offered at the discounted rate of $20 per person due to sponsorship from the town of Vail and Alpine Bank. To register, go to www.alpineartscenter.org.

Vail Performing Arts Academy presents “Broadway Stars”

Feel like you’ve traveled to New York City with the songs of Broadway filling the stage as the students from the Vail Performing Arts Academy’s present “Broadway Stars”, a revue featuring performances of Broadway hits.

Audiences will be entertained by students ages 8 to 18 who will be singing numbers from “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,” “Seussical The Musical,” “Anastasia,” “The Addams Family,” “Hairspray,” “Be More Chill,” “Matilda,” “Billie Elliot,” “Beetlejuice” and more.

Even though these performers are students, the acting, singing, costumes and set design are all top-notch. Annah Scully, executive producer of the Vail Performing Arts Academy, surrounds herself with professionals like Colin Meiring, artistic director; Melinda Carlson, vocal coach; Maria Barry, assistant choreographer and Val Watts, costumer. There are also technicians who help with logistics and countless parents and volunteers who really help each child’s experience live up to the Vail Performing Arts Academy’s slogan: The Most Important Stage in a Child’s Life.

Speaking of stages, the students get to perform on a stage that has seen the likes of B.B. King, Ringo Starr and Jay Leno. “Broadway Stars” will be hosted at the Vilar Performing Arts Center Saturday and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 for reserved seating. Call 970-845-8497 or visit www.vilarpac.org. To learn more about the Vail Performing Arts Academy, visit www.vpaa.org.

Epic Mountain Express Fill the Van food drive

On Saturday, Epic Mountain Express will be hosting the 22nd annual Fill the Van event across our mountain communities. Fill the Van is the largest single food drive across the mountain region, with donated food going directly to local food banks.

Chances are you need to grab some groceries this week, so why not wait and shop on Saturday during the food drive and pick up some extra non-perishable items, put them in a separate bag at checkout and drop them off on your way out of the store. Epic Mountain Express makes it easy for you to help our neighbors in need.

Collection locations will be set up all throughout Eagle County and beyond. Look for the teams next to the colorful Epic Mountain Express vans between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the following locations:

Eagle County locations:

  • City Market – Vail
  • City Market – Avon
  • City Market – Eagle
  • Safeway – Vail
  • Wal-Mart – Eagle-Vail
  • Village Market – Edwards        

Summit County locations:

  • Safeway – Frisco 
  • City Market – Dillon
  • City Market – Breckenridge

Roaring Fork Valley locations:

  • City Market – Glenwood
  • City Market – El Jebel

Veterans visit local schools

Do you have any medals? How hard was boot camp? What was the food like? What’s it like to blackout because of G-forces in a B-52 bomber?

Those are just a few of the many questions kids asked local veterans last week. The local Mount of the Holy Cross VFW post 10721 veterans visited 19 schools in Eagle County.

Leading up to Veteran’s Day, local vets from all branches of the military attend receptions, assemblies and classroom talks. Kids from all grade levels were able to learn more about what it was like to be on a tour of duty or to serve during a time of peace. The kids honored them with songs, messages of appreciation and an ear to listen to their stories.

We visited Brush Creek Elementary last Wednesday and sat in on one of the talks in Mr. Musser’s 5th-grade class. After the assemblies, one or two veterans go into the classrooms to discuss their experiences and bring in items from their time of service to show the kids. For over 45 minutes, the students were glued to every word the guest speakers were saying.

Guest speakers in this classroom were United States Marine Corps Captain Bill Welch who spoke about his service during wartime in Vietnam. Dana Whelan was in the United States Air Force as a Lieutenant Colonel and spoke of her service during peacetime. 

Welch wore his fatigues and talked about everything from how hot it was and how bad the bugs were to the Ho Chi Minh Trail and how the only way they could communicate with friends and family back home was through letters. He showed the kids where Vietnam was on the map and why they slept with their boots on.

“There was this one time I took off my boots, just for a little bit, but then I fell asleep. I woke up in the middle of the night and my legs were burning! I couldn’t turn on a flashlight in case the enemy was watching, but it didn’t take me long to realize that I had slept near a big red ant hill,” Welch said.

Whelan spoke about the amazing opportunities she had in furthering her education and how service members are highly trained and are able to take on a lot of different challenges. During her time in the military, she was able to work and earn several degrees in places such as Washington, D.C., Wyoming, Alabama, Texas and Ramstein, Germany where she was in charge of nutrition for all of the branches of the U.S. military stationed in Europe.

“I think the thing that’s most meaningful to me about the Veteran’s Day events is giving kids that may have no exposure to military service the opportunity to hear stories of veterans,” Whelan said. “Hopefully we’ll inspire them to go home and ask their families about family members who have served and provide a chance for them to really appreciate and have some gratitude for what so many people have done for our country.”

The kids paid attention and did bring that conversation home. Michelle Sanders, the mother of Wynn Sanders, a 5th-grader in Mr. Musser’s class at Brush Creek Elementary, said that Wynn came home full of enthusiasm about the talks. “He explained in great detail what the veterans said that day. We had an engaging dinner conversation and it was fun to hear his perspective on the veteran’s visit,” Sanders said.

As much as the kids benefit from the school visits, the veterans benefit as well. “I’ve only been doing these school visits for a couple of years now and when I first started I would get kind of emotional,” Welch said. “It’s good for us to talk about it.”

The Mount of the Holy Cross VFW post 10721 veterans will host a Veteran’s Day ceremony that is open to the public at Freedom Park in Edwards on Monday at 4 p.m.

More ski resorts opening, holiday craft fairs, art walks and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/8/19

More ski resorts open

Although the calendar still says autumn, winter is here in the minds of many skiers and snowboarders who are enjoying lift-accessed skiing and riding in Colorado. Arapahoe Basin and Keystone have been open since mid-October with Loveland, Eldora, Monarch and Wolf Creek opening their slopes a few weeks later. This Friday marks the opening day for two more Colorado resorts: Breckenridge and Copper Mountain. A snowy and cool October brought a lot of natural snow to the resorts and snowmaking crews have combined forces with Mother Nature to allow more than one run to be open this early in the season.

Breckenridge Ski Resort will offer nearly 200 acres of terrain on Peak 8 for opening day. Skiers and riders will have access to a variety of groomed trails on lower Peak 8 accessed by the Colorado SuperChair, Rocky Mountain SuperChair, 5-Chair and Rip’s Ride. The resort will offer skiing and riding for all ability levels on trails including Springmeier, 4 O’Clock, Columbine, Northstar, Duke’s, Claimjumper and Trygve’s.

Lifts are set to open at 9 a.m. while the BreckConnect Gondola will open at 8 a.m. to provide access from Town and the Gondola lots to the base of Peak 8. The official first chair celebration and banner-breaking will take place on the Colorado SuperChair. Before the rope drops, guests can enjoy complimentary waffles and DJ music on the snow.

Take note of some of the new conveniences at Peak 8 such as escalators, skier drop-off parking, skier services facilities, rental and retail space, public restrooms and more. You can buy a day pass or Epic Passes are still available through Nov. 24. For information on the resort, go to www.breckenridge.com. For information on Epic Passes, visit www.epicpass.com.

Copper Mountain will also open on Friday with more than 90 acres of terrain featuring skiing and riding for all ability levels. The American Eagle lift will begin turning at 9 a.m. and shortly thereafter the Easy Rider and Excelerator lifts will spin.

Trails that are expected to open Friday include Ptarmigan, Rhapsody, Main Vein, Fairplay and Easy Rider. Additionally, Lower Bouncer is expected to feature a Woodward Pop-Up park consisting of one jump and about a dozen features. Skiers and riders can look for more natural terrain to open as conditions allow.

Throughout the weekend, guests can enjoy free live music, giveaways and a variety of dining and après ski options throughout Center Village.

Copper Mountain season passes are on sale for $589 for adults and $289 for children until November 18 when prices increase $40 and $20 respectively. The last chance to purchase Copper Mountain Four Packs for $279 in-person and online is now through November 18. For more information on opening day and passes, visit www.coppercolorado.com.

To show Copper’s appreciation for military veterans, the resort will offer $60 lift tickets on Veteran’s Day, Monday, Nov. 11. The $60 discounted lift tickets are available for one day only to all skiers and riders and must be purchased online before midnight Monday.

Vail Nordic Ski Swap

We just had the big Vail Ski & Snowboard Club swap where you could get everything you needed for alpine skiing and snowboarding a few weeks ago. This weekend, the Vail Nordic Center hosts the 35th annual Nordic Ski Swap at the Vail Nordic and Golf Clubhouse in Vail.

Winters are long in Colorado, so switch things up by switching out your activities. Taking a day off from alpine skiing or snowboarding and heading out to do some cross country skiing or skate skiing lets you experience the outdoors in a different way. Telemark gear and alpine touring gear can get you up to that next hut trip or allow you to avoid the crowds by skiing in the backcountry. Or skin up the mountain before work to get some cardio in before you start your day. Whatever your mode of transportation, it all provides a great workout (remember, the holidays are coming and you need to fit into those ski pants).

Getting into a new sport can be expensive. By going to a swap, you are able to find the gear that will allow you to try out the sport and see if it is right for you without paying retail.

Buy or sell skate skis, touring and track skis as well as telemark, backcountry and snowshoe equipment. Winter clothing will be on sale as well. Drop off Nordic gear you want to sell between 2 to 6 p.m. on Friday. The Nordic Ski Swap takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday with discounts starting after 12 p.m. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Homestake Peak School Nordic program. Please note that it is cash or check only for purchases. Visit www.vailrec.com or call 970-479-2279 for more information.

2nd Friday Artwalks on Broadway

Eagle Arts presents 2nd Friday Artwalks this Friday, but this time it’s extra special because the art community in Eagle is celebrating its first anniversary. What started out as an idea artist Tara Novak of Artspace workshop+gallery hatched with the Vail Valley Art Guild and Red Canyon Cafe to host the first Eagle Art Walk last November has grown into an event that encompasses more than art.

Broadway Street in Eagle will turn into a holiday market with galleries, shops and restaurants offering art exhibitions, live music, interactive activities, sales and specials.

Presented by Eagle Arts and the Broadway Business Community, join family and friends from 5 to 8 p.m. for a fun evening out. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/eagleartscolorado. Here are a few of the participating businesses and what they will be featuring:

  • Alpaca Yarn Shop
    – Live alpacas, bring your knitting projects for a Knit Night
  • Artspace workshop+gallery
    – Art exhibit and live music
    – Eagle Arts raffle and food drive – bring a canned food item, get a ticket
    – 3 Holiday gift making mini-workshops
  • Bonfire Brewing
    – Happy hour and live music
  • Old Town Hall Gallery – Vail Valley Art Guild
    – New gallery location and exhibition
    – Live music with Jen Mack
  • Owashi Sushi & Kitchen
    – Art exhibit and dinner special
  • Katch of the Day Wine Bar
    – Fundraiser for Zehr Goat Ranch with goats
  • Brush Creek Saloon
    – Dinner specials
  • Everyday Outfitters
    – Live Music, refreshments and art
  • Fusion Hair Salon
    – Art and pottery exhibition
  • Petals of Provence
    – Holiday gift making mini-workshop

Craftsman’s Christmas Market

What’s been known as the Chicken Noodle Soup & Bazaar for years is now the Craftsman’s Christmas Market. Hosted at the Brush Creek Elementary in Eagle, the holiday market and crafts fair will feature hand-made items that are unique to this region. Shoppers will still be able to find their favorite western and vintage items as well as visit the man in the big red suit. Santa will make an appearance in Eagle County, so bring the kids along to this event.

Along with the crafts, the famous home-made chicken noodle soup and pies will be available for purchase to enjoy with friends while you shop or you can even take it home and enjoy it later.  

This holiday fair has been going on for over 40 years and is the main fundraiser for the United Methodist Women of Eagle Valley. The proceeds from this event go directly to helping women and children in our community and throughout the world. Stop by Brush Creek Elementary School from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday.

Veteran’s Day Ceremony

Leading up to Veteran’s Day, which is Monday, the veterans from the Mount of the Holy Cross VFW Post 10721 out of Minturn were busy visiting 19 schools and being part of receptions, assemblies and classroom talks. Kids from all grade levels were able to learn more about what it was like to be on a tour of duty or to serve during a time of peace.

Many of the veterans wore their uniforms or fatigues and brought other items like canteens, technical backpacks and fireproof flight suits to share in the classrooms so the kids could see the gear and learn about what it was like in the jungles of Vietnam during that war or flying a B-52 bomber.

According to Military.com, Veteran’s Day honors veterans who are living or deceased who served honorably in the military during wartime or peacetime. It is sometimes confused with Memorial Day, which honors service members who died during service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle. Veteran’s Day is observed on Nov. 11, which was also known as Armistice Day.

A public Veterans Day ceremony will be held at Freedom Park in Edwards at 4 p.m. on Monday. The guest speaker will be retired US Navy Chaplain Rabbi Joel Newman. The VFW has enlisted the talents of community members to perform on Monday. Nicole Gustafson will sing the “National Anthem”. Gustafson is a former student of Vail Performing Arts Academy, who is currently attending Colorado Mountain College working towards a nursing degree. The 5th-grade classes from Edwards and Avon Elementary Schools will be singing also.

Freedom Park hosts many military-related ceremonies throughout the year. Along the west end of the pond, you will find the Freedom Park Memorial, a 600-pound piece of limestone from the Pentagon’s west wall. The memorial not only commemorates 9/11 but also honors fallen veterans, police and emergency personnel from Eagle County.

Walking Mountains Film Series starts Wednesday

Walking Mountains Science Center will host its eighth annual Sustainable Film Series on a new night and at a new venue. The Riverwalk Theater in Edwards will host films each month on Wednesday nights from now until April. Walking Mountains had been showing the same film upvalley and downvalley each month. With a centralized location, the series will now host one movie per month in an actual theater.

“When we were looking for a new venue, we reached out to Grant Smith from the Riverwalk Theater, and he was interested, said Melissa Kirr, senior programs director of sustainability for Walking Mountains. We decided that by moving to a centrally located spot in the valley, we could combine the two film nights into one. We are very excited to be able to have everyone in one place.”

Smith is excited to host. “This aligns with our mission to really have the Riverwalk Theater be involved with the community. We are happy to host locals and visitors and bring some great films to the big screen,” Smith said.

Kirr sources the films from all over the globe, reviewing flicks that are out on the festival circuit and checking in with film publishers and promoters.

“I try to find a variety of sustainability topics so that everyone can find an interest. I always take recommendations from community members, too,” Kirr said.

The topics center around energy, waste, natural resources, climate change, sustainable food, sustainable tourism and sustainable communities and lifestyles.

On Wednesday, Walking Mountains will kick off the series with “Paris to Pittsburgh.”

“This film focuses on how Americans are demanding and creating real solutions around climate change. This hits home as the community continues to meet goals created by the local climate action plan,” Kirr said.

She is also looking forward to “The Wild” film in March.

“This is the third film that we have shown since we started the film series on the Pebble Mine and Bristol Bay in Alaska. I had the chance to see this film at a festival recently, and it is really impactful,” Kirr said. “We always partner with Kaleb’s Katch to share these films, and he always ends up bringing some tasty salmon appetizers.”

Speaking of food, the Riverwalk Theater can take care of dinner for you right at the theater. They serve more than just popcorn. Try the pizzas from Village Bagel or gourmet hot dogs from Colorado Meat Co. Come early and enjoy happy hour specials on beer and wines by the glass from 3-6 p.m. (Yes, when Smith took over the Riverwalk Theater, he also brought in the adult beverages.)

In addition to a new night and new venue, Walking Mountains will also bring in a few directors from the films and outdoor apparel company Fjallraven will be giving away an item at each event. 

Walking Mountain’s goal for this series is to provoke thought and create action, so take part in the opportunity to learn at this free monthly film series. For dates and more on each film visit walkingmountains.org.

Halloween parties, ski movies, live music and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/01/19

Underground Sound concert series

It’s hard to believe that we are already halfway through the Underground Sound concert series at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek. Friday night’s installment will get you moving with a lively show by Las Cafeteras at 7:30 p.m.

Las Cafeteras is comprised of six bandmates from East Lost Angeles who grew up with many different influences of music including Mexican music and especially Afro-Mexican music. Las Cafeteras uses traditional Son Jarocho instruments like the jarana, requinto, quijada (donkey jawbone) and tarima (a wooden platform). It may sound traditional but don’t be surprised if they infuse their performance with a little rock, punk, hip-hop, beat music and cumbia.

Since forming Las Cafeteras in 2005, the band has shared the stage with Ozomatli, Edwards Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes, Columbian superstar Juanes, Mexican icons Caifanes and many more.

This show also coincides with Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), a Mexican holiday that celebrates and honors loved ones who have passed away. “We speak in five different languages: English, Spanish, Spanglish, justice, and love,” said Las Cafeteras founder, Hector Flores in a press release. “I think everybody understands at least one of those languages.”

Tickets for Friday’s show are $32 or use your Underground Sound pass. For more information, go to www.vilarpac.org.

Halloween parties continue

Speaking of dancing and great music, the Halloween theme didn’t stop on Thursday night. There are a few more opportunities to wear your costumes at these area fetes:

Scary-oke Karaoke – Loaded Joe’s

  • Karaoke all night
  • Costumes are encouraged
  • Free entry
  • Prize giveaways
  • Friday, 9:30 p.m. until close
  • www.loadedjoes.com

Boo Bash – Frost Bar at the Sebastian Vail

  • $20 tickets – includes two free drink tickets for wine and beer, also a cash bar
  • Music by DJ Krusher Jones
  • Costume contest with a chance to win $350 cash, a $100 Sebastian gift card plus other prizes
  • Halloween games
  • Friday, 8 p.m. until midnight
  • For tickets visit www.alwaysmountaintime.com
  • The Sebastian is offering an overnight package on Friday night: pay $175 for a one-night stay and get two tickets to the Boo Bash, waived resort fee and waived parking fee. Call the Sebastian to book your stay.  

Kids Night Out

Parents, treat yourself to a date night while your kids are having fun and being active at Mountain Recreation in Edwards and Gypsum. On select Friday nights throughout the year, parents can drop the kids off at either location at 5:30 p.m. and pick them up at 8 p.m. Please note; there is no Kids Night Out at the Edwards location this Friday. Check the website for dates at both locations. During that time, the kids will have plenty of things to do including use of the trampolines in the anti-gravity center, the rock climbing wall, swimming pool (Gypsum only) along with themed activities, games and crafts.

Mountain Recreation brings the fun activities, your kids just need to bring a costume if they wish (themes change weekly, so call ahead for more information) closed-toe shoes, activewear and a swimsuit and towel (Gypsum only).

Kids Night Out is for kids ages 5-12. The registration fee is $20 per child and that includes dinner. To learn more and register, go to www.mountainrecreation.com.

Ski Movie Night at the Riverwalk Theater

Nothing gets you quite into the winter snowsports season like an adrenaline-packed film filled with powder, big air and amazing scenery. You’ll find all that and more in “The Book of Pow”, a film by local freeskier John Spriggs and filmmaker Edward Clem.

Clem and Spriggs live in Frisco and filmed the movie all last winter on their days off from work, so all of their scenes are in the heart of the Colorado Rockies. Last year’s snowstorms created some amazing pillow lines and champagne powder shots that rival runs anywhere else in the world. The film debuted in Annecy, France in early October at the High Five Film Festival and received rave reviews.

Joining Spriggs on the slopes was U.S. Ski Team member, Taylor Seaton, who competes in ski halfpipe. Seaton and Spriggs are both Battle Mountain High School graduates. Clem, Spriggs and Seaton are traveling around to show their movie at various film festivals.

“The Book of Pow” also has another local tie-in. Local backcountry snowboarder Bindu Sky Pomeroy died while performing an inverted maneuver off a set of cliffs in East Vail. In an article written by John LaConte earlier this week, Spriggs said that this film is dedicated “in honor of Bindu and everyone else we’ve lost doing this.”

The Riverwalk Theater will host “The Book of Pow” followed by “In the Meantime,” the third installment in the Tanner Hall short-film trilogy. Along with the films, there will be autograph signings with Spriggs and Seaton, a raffle and plenty of swag giveaways.

The Riverwalk Theater will also have traditional movie theater snacks along with pizza from Village Bagel and hot dogs from Colorado Meat Company. The theater also serves a large selection of microbrews, wines and canned cocktails, so come early and grab a bite to eat and drink before the event starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are available at the Riverwalk Theater box office. For more information about the Riverwalk Theater, go to www.riverwalktheater.com.

America Recycles Day

Take advantage of these weekends before Vail and Beaver Creek open up their ski slopes for the season and clean up things around the house. In honor of America Recycles Day on Friday, the town of Vail is offering a free collection for residents and employees in Vail of the following items:

  • Electronic waste
  • Paper for shredding
  • Old vinyl banners
  • Used bike tubes

If you aren’t quite sure what type of items can be recycled, get the Eagle County Waste Wizard app. Download it to your phone and you can easily look items up and dispose of them in the proper way.  Bring the items you wish to recycle to the oversize vehicle lot at the Lionshead Parking Structure between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday. Charges may apply for excessive volumes of things you are trying to get rid of. No commercial collection accepted at this event. To learn more go to www.lovevail.org.

Nut butter owls help break up the sugar binge on Halloween

Kids are pounding the candy and, according to www.verywellfit.com, are eating more than 3,500 calories on Halloween. Adults are gobbling up tons of calories too. How many times are we grabbing a “mini” sweet treat displayed at the office or a spiked hot cocoa to get in the spirit? On average, each mini candy has about 70 calories per piece. Add ten pieces to the mix…you can do the math.

If you’re trying to keep the sweets in check, consider making a healthy plan for the day and sticking with it. Don’t eat mindlessly. In an attempt to weasel in something kind of healthy, I made a malleable peanut or almond butter ball. By adding some googly candy eyes and an almond for a beak, I made little owls for Halloween.  They’re full of protein and oats, fun to play with and tasty.

Having something healthy besides all the sweets can create a balance that may help keep calories in check this holiday. Consider portioning out what candy you will eat for the day, put it in a cute plastic pumpkin for carrying.

Slow sucking lollipops or gum can keep you in the spirit while giving you a sugary blast. A tootsie pop has 60 calories, challenge yourself and be the first human to count the licks to the middle – this may even burn calories. According to Tootsie Roll’s website, (www.tootsie.com) a Purdue licking machine created by engineering students calculated 364 licks. Finding a slow sucking candy is a good way to consume less and still get that sugar fix. Enjoy the festivities and be good to your body.

Nut butter Halloween owls

1 cup almond or peanut butter

1 ripe banana

1 ¼ cup oats

¼ cup chocolate chips

½ cup colored sugar (orange)

In a small saucepan, melt butter and mash in banana. Stir in oats and let cool for 20 minutes. Mix in chocolate chips. Form one-inch balls and flatten them out a bit. Roll in the orange sugar. Press candy eyes (you can find this in the baking aisle at the grocery store) into the ball and use an almond for the nose. Place in refrigerator to cool and harden slightly before serving.

If you need other ideas for healthier snacks, learn how to make Miller’s Halloween Carrot Toast or Skeleton Skins and Fry Fingers

Tracy Miller is a personal chef and caterer. She can be reached at Tracy@colorfulcooking.com.

Alpine Arts Center hosts Pinots and Pumpkins

This past weekend was sure to get you into the Halloween spirit with Fright at the Museum, Spooktacular in Beaver Creek and Maya’s Day of the Dead party. But if you didn’t go to those events, you still have time to get in on some Halloween fun before the holiday on Thursday.

Alpine Arts Center had a busy weekend with Halloweens crafts and a pumpkin carving party last Friday but will host one more Halloween-themed event on Wednesday. Pinots and Pumpkins allows adults to release their creative side and paint a pumpkin while sipping on a Pinot Noir or other wine of their choice.

Pinots and Pumpkins is a twist on Alpine Arts Center’s regular Cocktails and Canvas series, where the group goes through a guided painting session. This time, instead of painting on a canvas, you are painting on a pumpkin.

Lauren Merrill, owner of the Alpine Arts Center, and her team of talented staff members will have patterns and all the paint and brushes you will need. You just bring any size and shape pumpkin you can find. Dress comfortably and Alpine Arts will have aprons to protect your clothing. The best part is, you can come here instead of getting your own house messy.

If you want to get a little messy, they will have one table available for pumpkin carving during their regularly scheduled drop-in sessions. Call the Alpine Arts Center for details. 

Halloween is the perfect time to revitalize your creativity.  Whether it’s in the form of a homemade costume or decorating a pumpkin, you are never too old to release your artistic side. The cost for the Pinots and Pumpkins class is $45 per person. Bring your own pumpkin and your first drink is free. There will also be wine and beer available for purchase for $6 per glass. Snacks and other non-alcoholic beverages are available, also. For more information, visit www.alpineartscenter.org. Advanced registration is required.

Ski swap, Halloween fun, Loveland opens and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 10/25/19

Ski & Snowboard Club Vail Ski Swap

For 50 years, outdoor enthusiasts have looked forward to the annual Ski & Snowboard Club Vail’s Swap held each fall in Vail. From Oct. 25 to 27, the Dobson Arena is converted into a department store-type of setting with gear like skis, snowboards, boots, poles, helmets, outwear and bindings taking over the entire place.

This is the spot to go if you just moved to town and need equipment in order to participate in outdoor activities this season. It’s also the place to go if your kids have outgrown their jackets and snow pants since last year. If you lost a pair of gloves at the end of the season those can be found here, too. Want to try a new sport? Get geared up at a discount while helping out a good cause.

A percentage of sales from the swap benefit Ski & Snowboard Club Vail, helping the organization fulfill its mission to inspire character growth and excellence in young athletes throughout the Vail community.

New and used gear is up for sale and you never know what you are going to find. There will be helpful and knowledgeable staff and volunteers on hand to answer questions about gear or accessories you are looking for.

Here’s how it works, on Friday there is a $15 admission fee for adults and teenagers from 5 to 7 p.m. Kids 12 and under are free. At 7 p.m. on Friday, the fee drops to $5. Shoppers can also get $5 off admission with a student ID. The venue will close at 10 p.m. The Swap will be open for business from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. There is no entry fee on those days, but keep in mind that the best selection and sizes will be available on Friday. Visit www.vailskiswap.com for more information.

Halloween happenings for kids

Halloween isn’t until next Thursday, but there are many events and activities that will get kids into the spooky spirit this weekend. 

13th annual Halloween lock-in at Gypsum Rec Center

  • Kids get the whole facility for one night and also get a haunted house, costume contest, Halloween movie, swimming, gymnastics and more.
  • Drop off kids by 6 p.m. Friday and pick up by 11:30 p.m. Friday or 8 a.m. on Saturday
  • Kids should bring a sleeping bag, pillow, Halloween costume and swimsuit
  • Boys and girls 5 to 12 years old, tickets are $45
  • www.mountainrec.org

Village Market Pumpkin Fest for Mountain Youth–Riverwalk-Saturday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

  • Trick-or-Treat Street at the various stores, face painting and $5 pumpkins courtesy of Village Market
  • Alpine Arts Center crafts and painting
  • www.mountainyouth.org

Fright at the Museum-Walking Mountains-Saturday 1 to 5 p.m.

  • Pumpkin chuckin’, petting zoo, pop-up corn maze
  • Apple cider demos and tastings, seasonal beer and wines for adults
  • Freaky farm haunted trail, pumpkin patch and carving
  • Learn about compost and freaky food and herbs
  • Snacks will be available
  • Please bring a reusable bottle for water and plan to carpool to the Elk Lot and take the free shuttle to Walking Mountains
  • Tickets are $15 and children 3-years-old and younger are free
  • www.walkingmountains.org

Alpine Arts Center-Halloween arts and crafts

  • Pumpkin carving event on Friday 4 to 7 p.m. Bring a pumpkin and snacks, stencils and tools to carve or paint a pumpkin will be available. The cost is $15 per person and all ages are welcome
  • Drop-in pumpkin carving during Pumpkin Fest on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Cocktails and Canvas guided painting event on Saturday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
  • www.alpineartscenter.org

Beaver Creek Spooktacular – Sunday 4 to 8:30 p.m.

  • Spooky Stroll around Beaver Creek Village and the woods near the base area of Beaver Creek 4 to 6 p.m.
  • Trick or Treating in Beaver Creek Village, games and more 4 to 7 p.m.
  • “Hocus Pocus” movie showing outdoors in Beaver Creek Village 7 to 8:30 p.m.
  • www.beavercreek.com/events

Halloween fun for adults

Kids aren’t the only ones having fun, adults can take part in the Halloween-themed events as well. Here are a few parties going on this weekend:

Maya Day of the Dead – Friday 5 to 10 p.m. 

  • Tickets are $20 in advance and that includes the all-you-can-eat taco bar and one margarita or $25 at the door includes an all-you-can-eat taco bar
  • Costume contest
  • Grateful Dead cover band
  • Pumpkin painting, s’mores station and more
  • Call Maya for tickets: 970-790-5500

Tricks for Treats Parents Night Out–Friday 7 to 9 p.m.

  • Drop the kids off at the Vail Gymnastics Center and go out and enjoy a date night
  • Activities for kids include a haunted house, costume contest, games and movie
  • Pizza will be served to the kids
  • $20 per child, for ages 5 years and older
  • www.vailrec.com

Dramaween- Friday at Route 6 Cafe at 7 p.m. to close

Halloween at the MAC-Mountain Art Collective–Friday from 9 p.m. to close

  • Music by Austin Gavlak and Chris Calderon, visuals by Mtn Man Lasers
  • $10 tickets at the door, $5 drinks, free keg from 9 to 10 p.m.
  • Costume contest
  • Visit Mountain Art Collective’s Facebook page for more info

Minturn Saloon – Saturday 7 p.m. to 1 a.m.

  • Live music by Turntable Review
  • A free Coors Light to the first 100 people
  • $20 donation to the Minturn Community Fund
  • Theme: American horror story
  • Costume contest
  • www.minturncommunityfund.org

Opening day at Loveland Ski Area

We now have not one, not two, but three ski areas to choose from in Colorado. Loveland Ski Area announced earlier this week that opening day will be Friday. Other ski areas that are open include Arapahoe Basin, which opened last Friday and Keystone, which opened last Saturday.

The Chet’s Dream lift will start spinning at 9 a.m. on Friday and will offer access to one full top-to-bottom run. The trails Catwalk, Mambo and Home Run make up this run on opening day, which is over a mile in length and nearly 1,000 vertical feet.

“Our snowmaking team has been working around the clock to get the mountain ready and all of their hard work is about to pay off,” said COO Rob Goodell in a press release. “Mother Nature chipped in with almost a foot of snow during this last storm cycle and that was the boost we needed. Winter is officially here and we can’t wait to celebrate the start of another season.”

Loveland Ski Area will be open seven days a week until early May. Operating hours will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the week and from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the weekends and designated holidays. For more information, visit www.skiloveland.com.

Muscles for Mills fundraiser

Crosstraining Fitness of Vail is hosting an autumn fundraiser on Saturday and this year the proceeds will go toward Noah Mills, a 5-year-old who has been diagnosed with kidney cancer. Typically Crosstraining Fitness of Vail does Barbells for Boobs, a breast cancer fundraiser held annually during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. They switched up the focus this year in order to help the Mills family as they go through this ordeal. Vail Brewing Company is also involved and will provide the beer for the after-party.

Muscles for Mills invites teams consisting of families and friends to come out to participate in the Fun Fitness Challenge. It’s geared toward all fitness levels and ages in order to welcome as many people as possible. Don’t have a team and want to participate? Don’t worry, they will be grouping people together that day to ensure that as many people who want to sweat for a cause can do so.

Noah Mills was recently diagnosed with late-stage bilateral renal (kidney) cancer, called Wilms tumor. The main goal of this fundraiser is to raise money for the Mills family as they go through this difficult time.

The big event happens on Saturday starting at 10:30 a.m. People can register teams for the Fun Fitness Challenge or donate items for the auction here: http://www.cfvcolorado.com/musclesformills2019.html

The Colorado Snowsports Museum is adding 5 new faces to its Hall of Fame Saturday

The most important annual celebration of the state’s snowsports industry is on tap for Saturday, Oct. 26, as Vail Marriott Mountain Resort plays host to the Colorado Snowsports Hall of Fame Induction Gala.

Each year, the event honors individuals and organizations that have played significant roles in the development and promotion of skiing and snowboarding throughout the state of Colorado. Inductees are nominated and selected based on their contributions as an athlete, sport builder, inspiration or pioneer.

The 2019 Hall of Fame class includes five new inductees, including Aspen’s Gretchen Bleiler, an Olympic medalist and Colorado’s most successful snowboard athlete. She will be joined by Jeff Gorsuch, an Aspen ski retailer and philanthropist with a focus on kids and skiing; the late Martin Hart, who helped transform Steamboat Springs into one of the foremost ski resorts in the nation; and Steve Raymond, co-founder of the Adaptive Spirit program and a major fundraiser for the U.S. Paralympic Ski Team.

The 2019 Pioneer Hall of Fame selection is Jake Hoeschler of Winter Park, who revolutionized the ski retail industry with his exclusive ski liability insurance program, which now includes millions of dollars of coverage.

“We are pleased to honor this incredible class of Hall of Fame inductees,” explained Jennifer Mason, Executive Director of the Colorado Snowsports Museum.  “They truly have made significant contributions to our sport and ensured that Colorado skiing and snowboarding remains center stage.”

In addition to the five new Hall of Fame inductees, the evening will also celebrate the recipients of the Hall of Fame’s Annual Recognition Awards.  This year’s honorees will include longtime Colorado Snowsports Museum volunteer Cindy Clement (Lifetime Achievement Award); the Colorado Avalanche Information Center (Top of the Hill Award); U.S. Ski Team star Mikaela Shiffrin (Competitor of the Year Award); Durango’s Brittani Coury (Adaptive Athlete of the Year) and Collegiate Skiers of the Year Mikaela Tommy (University of Colorado) and Jett Seymour (University of Denver).

Tickets for the gala are currently on sale, with reserved individual tickets are priced at $325. Tables for ten are available for $3,750. A $250 general individual ticket is also available, but it does not include seating location preference. To purchase tickets or for additional information, please contact museum@snowsportsmuseum.org, visit the Colorado Snowsports Museum website at snowsportsmuseum.org or call 970-476-1876. 

All proceeds from the Hall of Fame Gala will benefit the Colorado Snowsports Museum.

The haunted history of Eagle County

Murders, monsters and mining misadventures…those topics will all be discussed in haunting detail this Wednesday at the Avon Public Library. Learn about how our Happy Valley has a dark side with Eagle County historian, Kathy Heicher.

To learn more about Eagle County’s haunted past, I met Heicher at, of all places, the Sunset View Cemetery in Eagle (it was daylight, thank goodness) and we walked through tombstones dating back to the early to mid-1900s. We’d stop every once in a while and Heicher would give me a brief story about whose tombstone was whose and what they did in Eagle County. It was really quite fascinating to think about the pioneering days and just what it was like to live here back then.  

In the spirit of Halloween, Heicher will speak about Eagle County’s haunted history and how it involves more than adventurous miners and hard-toiling farmers. There are also stories to be told about murder, tragedy, and perhaps the ghosts of a pioneer or two who just don’t seem to be at rest.

“Local history is always intriguing. And even back in the late 1800s, people could not resist a scary story with gory details. We find a surprising amount of that stuff in our archives. Some of the more captivating stories are just as fascinating today as they were back then,” Heicher said.

And what about that shadowy monster that was blamed in early decades for the mysterious disappearances of miners and soldiers?

“In the 1880s, Eagle County was often a wild place, characterized by rowdy mining camps and risk-taking pioneers. While there are many stories of courage and fortitude, there are also tales of murder and monsters. Some of it is absolutely true, and some of it is more of what we now call ‘urban legend.’ It all factors in to what we are today.”

Peppered throughout Heicher’s talk will be all sorts of pictures from the Eagle County Historical Society and Eagle Valley Library District’s photo archive.

Heicher didn’t tell me all the tales and stories from Eagle County’s past in the cemetery that day because she wanted to save those details for the event at the Avon Public Library on Wednesday at 6 p.m. For more information, go to www.evld.org.