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Halloween parties, ski movies, live music and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/01/19

Underground Sound concert series

It’s hard to believe that we are already halfway through the Underground Sound concert series at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek. Friday night’s installment will get you moving with a lively show by Las Cafeteras at 7:30 p.m.

Las Cafeteras is comprised of six bandmates from East Lost Angeles who grew up with many different influences of music including Mexican music and especially Afro-Mexican music. Las Cafeteras uses traditional Son Jarocho instruments like the jarana, requinto, quijada (donkey jawbone) and tarima (a wooden platform). It may sound traditional but don’t be surprised if they infuse their performance with a little rock, punk, hip-hop, beat music and cumbia.

Since forming Las Cafeteras in 2005, the band has shared the stage with Ozomatli, Edwards Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes, Columbian superstar Juanes, Mexican icons Caifanes and many more.

This show also coincides with Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), a Mexican holiday that celebrates and honors loved ones who have passed away. “We speak in five different languages: English, Spanish, Spanglish, justice, and love,” said Las Cafeteras founder, Hector Flores in a press release. “I think everybody understands at least one of those languages.”

Tickets for Friday’s show are $32 or use your Underground Sound pass. For more information, go to www.vilarpac.org.

Halloween parties continue

Speaking of dancing and great music, the Halloween theme didn’t stop on Thursday night. There are a few more opportunities to wear your costumes at these area fetes:

Scary-oke Karaoke – Loaded Joe’s

  • Karaoke all night
  • Costumes are encouraged
  • Free entry
  • Prize giveaways
  • Friday, 9:30 p.m. until close
  • www.loadedjoes.com

Boo Bash – Frost Bar at the Sebastian Vail

  • $20 tickets – includes two free drink tickets for wine and beer, also a cash bar
  • Music by DJ Krusher Jones
  • Costume contest with a chance to win $350 cash, a $100 Sebastian gift card plus other prizes
  • Halloween games
  • Friday, 8 p.m. until midnight
  • For tickets visit www.alwaysmountaintime.com
  • The Sebastian is offering an overnight package on Friday night: pay $175 for a one-night stay and get two tickets to the Boo Bash, waived resort fee and waived parking fee. Call the Sebastian to book your stay.  

Kids Night Out

Parents, treat yourself to a date night while your kids are having fun and being active at Mountain Recreation in Edwards and Gypsum. On select Friday nights throughout the year, parents can drop the kids off at either location at 5:30 p.m. and pick them up at 8 p.m. Please note; there is no Kids Night Out at the Edwards location this Friday. Check the website for dates at both locations. During that time, the kids will have plenty of things to do including use of the trampolines in the anti-gravity center, the rock climbing wall, swimming pool (Gypsum only) along with themed activities, games and crafts.

Mountain Recreation brings the fun activities, your kids just need to bring a costume if they wish (themes change weekly, so call ahead for more information) closed-toe shoes, activewear and a swimsuit and towel (Gypsum only).

Kids Night Out is for kids ages 5-12. The registration fee is $20 per child and that includes dinner. To learn more and register, go to www.mountainrecreation.com.

Ski Movie Night at the Riverwalk Theater

Nothing gets you quite into the winter snowsports season like an adrenaline-packed film filled with powder, big air and amazing scenery. You’ll find all that and more in “The Book of Pow”, a film by local freeskier John Spriggs and filmmaker Edward Clem.

Clem and Spriggs live in Frisco and filmed the movie all last winter on their days off from work, so all of their scenes are in the heart of the Colorado Rockies. Last year’s snowstorms created some amazing pillow lines and champagne powder shots that rival runs anywhere else in the world. The film debuted in Annecy, France in early October at the High Five Film Festival and received rave reviews.

Joining Spriggs on the slopes was U.S. Ski Team member, Taylor Seaton, who competes in ski halfpipe. Seaton and Spriggs are both Battle Mountain High School graduates. Clem, Spriggs and Seaton are traveling around to show their movie at various film festivals.

“The Book of Pow” also has another local tie-in. Local backcountry snowboarder Bindu Sky Pomeroy died while performing an inverted maneuver off a set of cliffs in East Vail. In an article written by John LaConte earlier this week, Spriggs said that this film is dedicated “in honor of Bindu and everyone else we’ve lost doing this.”

The Riverwalk Theater will host “The Book of Pow” followed by “In the Meantime,” the third installment in the Tanner Hall short-film trilogy. Along with the films, there will be autograph signings with Spriggs and Seaton, a raffle and plenty of swag giveaways.

The Riverwalk Theater will also have traditional movie theater snacks along with pizza from Village Bagel and hot dogs from Colorado Meat Company. The theater also serves a large selection of microbrews, wines and canned cocktails, so come early and grab a bite to eat and drink before the event starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are available at the Riverwalk Theater box office. For more information about the Riverwalk Theater, go to www.riverwalktheater.com.

America Recycles Day

Take advantage of these weekends before Vail and Beaver Creek open up their ski slopes for the season and clean up things around the house. In honor of America Recycles Day on Friday, the town of Vail is offering a free collection for residents and employees in Vail of the following items:

  • Electronic waste
  • Paper for shredding
  • Old vinyl banners
  • Used bike tubes

If you aren’t quite sure what type of items can be recycled, get the Eagle County Waste Wizard app. Download it to your phone and you can easily look items up and dispose of them in the proper way.  Bring the items you wish to recycle to the oversize vehicle lot at the Lionshead Parking Structure between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday. Charges may apply for excessive volumes of things you are trying to get rid of. No commercial collection accepted at this event. To learn more go to www.lovevail.org.

The haunted history of Eagle County

Murders, monsters and mining misadventures…those topics will all be discussed in haunting detail this Wednesday at the Avon Public Library. Learn about how our Happy Valley has a dark side with Eagle County historian, Kathy Heicher.

To learn more about Eagle County’s haunted past, I met Heicher at, of all places, the Sunset View Cemetery in Eagle (it was daylight, thank goodness) and we walked through tombstones dating back to the early to mid-1900s. We’d stop every once in a while and Heicher would give me a brief story about whose tombstone was whose and what they did in Eagle County. It was really quite fascinating to think about the pioneering days and just what it was like to live here back then.  

In the spirit of Halloween, Heicher will speak about Eagle County’s haunted history and how it involves more than adventurous miners and hard-toiling farmers. There are also stories to be told about murder, tragedy, and perhaps the ghosts of a pioneer or two who just don’t seem to be at rest.

“Local history is always intriguing. And even back in the late 1800s, people could not resist a scary story with gory details. We find a surprising amount of that stuff in our archives. Some of the more captivating stories are just as fascinating today as they were back then,” Heicher said.

And what about that shadowy monster that was blamed in early decades for the mysterious disappearances of miners and soldiers?

“In the 1880s, Eagle County was often a wild place, characterized by rowdy mining camps and risk-taking pioneers. While there are many stories of courage and fortitude, there are also tales of murder and monsters. Some of it is absolutely true, and some of it is more of what we now call ‘urban legend.’ It all factors in to what we are today.”

Peppered throughout Heicher’s talk will be all sorts of pictures from the Eagle County Historical Society and Eagle Valley Library District’s photo archive.

Heicher didn’t tell me all the tales and stories from Eagle County’s past in the cemetery that day because she wanted to save those details for the event at the Avon Public Library on Wednesday at 6 p.m. For more information, go to www.evld.org.

Skiing, spa deals, free champagne and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 10/18/19

Skiing and snowboarding available in Colorado

It’s always been a race to see which resort can be the first to usher in the ski and snowboard season each fall. This year, Keystone thought they would be the first resort in North America to spin its lifts and welcome back skiers and riders on Oct. 12, but in a sneaky move, Arapahoe Basin opened to the public from 3:30 to 5:30 on Oct. 11.

Regardless of who was first, there were plenty of happy skiers and snowboarders enjoying some early season conditions with the help of some snowmaking equipment and cooler temperatures provided by Mother Nature.

With Keystone’s new state-of-the-art, automated snowmaking system, the resort was well-positioned to offer guests one of its earliest openings in more than 20 years. Keystone will continue to make snow at every opportunity as weather and conditions permit, and looks to expand terrain as soon as possible.

Keystone will be celebrating the start to the season with a Halloween costume contest, pancake breakfasts, live music, a bags tournament and more in upcoming weeks.

After closing this past Fourth of July, Arapahoe Basin didn’t have much of an off-season. In a surprise announcement at 1:45 p.m. last Friday, The Legend stated that it would be open less than two hours later, at 3:30 p.m. that afternoon.

Excited skiers and riders scrambled to find their gear, get off work or drive the distance to the base area to get in line and hold bragging rights for being present during opening day, well, maybe not a full day, but opening “afternoon.”

A-Basin will also have a few events to kick off the season including a Halloween concert and costume contest, so dress up your friends, family and even the dog in order to win prizes.

Before you go to either resort, check www.keystoneresorts.com and www.arapahoebasin.com for current conditions and terrain updates.

Underground Sound concert series

Save the best for last this weekend with a Sunday night show at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek. The Small Glories take the stage at 7:30 p.m. and will treat the listeners to some bluegrass and folk music. This marks the third concert out of the seven-concert series dubbed “love for the locals” and the Underground Sound pass is still available.

The Small Glories consists of JD Edwards and Cara Luft (Luft was also part of the Wailin’ Jennys). This folk singer-songwriter duo met by accident on the Canadian prairie when they played an anniversary show together at Winnipeg’s West End Cultural Centre.

The wit and banter between Luft and Edwards are all part of the show, and sometimes the duo spends more time setting up the song than it takes to actually play the song. But the crowd loves it and the intimate setting of the Vilar will be a perfect place for the audience to feel like they are a part of the show.

Tickets are available for $28. You can still take advantage of the savings offered in the Underground Sound pass. For $125, the pass gives you entry to Sunday’s show and four more concerts in this series, which goes through Nov. 11. With the pass, you also get a drink at each show and it is transferable. I did the math and you still come out ahead financially if you purchase this pass. For more information, go to www.vilarpac.org.

Spa Deals

The change of seasons is upon us and your body may be craving a change as well. Spas are offering specials this time of year on all sorts of treatments. Take a look at these deals below. If you don’t see your spa of choice, give them a call and see if they are running any specials.

The Spa at the Vail Athletic Club

  • $99 for your choice of 50-minute massage, scrub or facial
  • $189 for your choice of two services: 50-minute massage, scrub or facial
  • 25% off all other services
  • www.vailathleticclub.com

The Sonnenalp Spa

  • 50-minute signature massage or facial for $99
  • 25% off all other treatments
  • Upgrade to an 80-minute treatment for an additional $85
  • www.sonnenalp.com/spa

The Allegria Spa at the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek

  • Signature spa pedicure plus a glass of prosecco for $69
  • 50-minute custom massage or 45-minute rose quartz facial for $105
  • 80- minute custom massage for $149
  • 75-minute oxygen facial for $165
  • www.allegriaspa.com

Simply Massage

Spa Anjali at the Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa

  • $99 for a 50-minute massage or facial
  • $149 for a 75-minute massage or facial
  • $179 for 100-minute massage or facial
  • www.spaanjali.com

The Spa at Four Seasons Vail

  • 20% off massages, facials and body treatments during the month of October
  • Bring your state-issued identification upon check-in for the discount to be valid
  • www.fourseasons.com/vail/spa

The Rock Resorts Spa at the Lodge at Vail

  • $99 for a choice of a 50-minute massage, facial or body treatment
  • $149 for a choice of an 80-minute body treatment (which includes a free gift)
  • Book two treatments in one day and get a glass of champagne
  • 20% off a full-price Float Tank session
  • 20% off of a spray tan
  • www.thevailcollections.com/spa

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and many businesses are honoring that with events and deals through the end of the month. The Sonnenalp Breast Center in Edwards reminds you that this is also a good time to schedule your mammogram if you need one. They are even open on Saturdays throughout the month of October to help you fit an appointment into your schedule.

Spa Anjali at the Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa in Avon is raffling off two spa prizes with 100% of the proceeds going to the Vail Breast Cancer Awareness Group. The prizes are:

  • One four-hour Alpen Rejuvenation package valued at $370
  • One spa gift basket valued at $500

The raffle is going on between now and the end of the month and raffle tickets are priced at one ticket for $10 and three tickets for $20. Visit Spa Anjali to purchase your tickets and they are asking for cash only. Two winners will randomly be selected on Nov. 1. For more information, go to Spa Anjali’s Facebook page.

Barre Forte in Edwards is also getting into the spirit of giving back and invites you to tuck, hold and burn your way through a day of barre classes to raise money for the Vail Breast Cancer Awareness Group. This Saturday, take one class, two classes or as many as your muscles can handle during the Barre-A-Thon. Barre Forte is asking for a $10 donation for each class. Classes start at 9 a.m. and will continue each hour with 4 p.m. being the last class. Pink drinks will follow to celebrate the sweat and success of this fun fundraiser. Sign up in advance to secure your spot.

Barre Forte will also be donating a portion of all punch cards and pink merchandise sold during the month of October to the Vail Breast Cancer Awareness Group. For more information check out Barre Forte’s Facebook page.

The SKEA clothing line, led by Vail local Diane Boyer, is going to donate 5% of all sales during the month of October to the Shaw Cancer Center at Vail Health in Edwards. Proceeds will directly benefit patients at Shaw through the Spirit of Survival program where they receive free emotional and physical services to help them fight their battle. If you need a cute ski jacket, new snow pants or some of their great base layers or accessories buy them this month and help give back. Learn more at www.skealimited.com.

Celebrate International Champagne Day

Cheers to the off-season! If you need an excuse to make a toast, the new Grand Hyatt Vail is offering a complimentary glass of Moët & Chandon Champagne and specials at the hotel, restaurant and spa all weekend.

The Grand Hyatt Vail has partnered up with Moët & Chandon Champagne and is taking celebrations to a new level. At 6 p.m. on Friday, celebrate International Champagne Day by witnessing a Champagne sabering in the hotel’s Fireside Lounge. Complimentary glasses of Moët Impérial will be served and additional glasses available for $20.19 throughout the evening. Moët & Chandon specialists will be on hand for the event to discuss champagne and make pairing suggestions.

Grand Hyatt Vail will also offer $129 rooms on Friday night. The room rate includes tokens for the state’s only champagne vending machine, located in the lobby, that is filled with Moët & Chandon Champagne.

A Champagne brunch will be served on Saturday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in Gessner, Grand Hyatt Vail’s signature restaurant for $20.19. The special bubbly brunch menu will include decadent champagne pancakes, live entertainment and $20.19 glasses of Moët Ice with a unique celebratory twist. The Spa at the Grand Hyatt Vail will offer seasonal specials including a choice of a 50-minute classic massage or signature facial for $119 or upgrade to an 80-minute treatment for $190.

Lumberjack games, folk songs, pumpkin patches and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 10/11/19

Man of the Cliff

You’ve got to love an event with a tagline like this: “Gentlemen, start your beards!”

Flannel-clad folks will be flocking to Avon’s Nottingham Park on Saturday and Sunday to take part in the 11th annual Man of the Cliff. This event brings different types of competitions to the Vail Valley. Instead of mountain biking or trail running, participants get to show their skills at ax throwing, keg tossing, speed chopping, spear throwing and other lumberjack games.

Man of the Cliff isn’t just for the guys; ladies do pretty well during the competitions, also. Some of the tasks are more about finesse than pure strength.

New this year is the four-person team event. Get your plaid posse together and see if you can out-chop and out-toss the other teams. The winning team will be announced on Sunday along with the Man and Woman of the Cliff.  

This event started out as an idea hatched by Amanda Williams and her husband, Adam, while they were enjoying time with friends around a campfire in Red Cliff. The concept grew and became a reality hosted in Red Cliff for many years before moving to Avon. 

Every year, Man of the Cliff puts money toward a nonprofit. This year Can Do Multiple Sclerosis will receive the fundraising dollars.

Bonfire Brewing has been a supporter of Man of the Cliff for years and is the presenting sponsor of this year’s event. They will be serving up some of their classics along with seasonal brews.

To learn more about the event and to register a team, go to www.manofthecliff.com. Slots fill up fast, so register in advance. Participation costs $85, but you can also come and watch. Spectators pay $10 and the proceeds all go to Can Do MS.

Underground Sound Concert Series

If you like the sounds of Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash or Robert Earl Keen, then this week’s Underground Sound concert with Todd Snider is for you. Snider will be sharing the stage with special guest Ramblin’ Jack Elliott on Friday at the Vilar Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. 

You may be thinking, ‘Todd Snider…how do I know that name?’ Well, in addition to touring solo, Snider is also known as the frontman of supergroup Hard Working Americans, a band made up of members of Widespread Panic and the Chris Robinson Brotherhood.

Snider has been called a troubadour and philosopher but he is truly a storyteller and tells those stories through folk music.

Joining Snider in all of this storytelling is Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, who is considered to be the foundation of the folk music scene. Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits and even Johnny Cash have paid homage to Elliott because, even with all the trends the music industry sees, his songs are timeless. 

The intimate setting of the Vilar will lend itself to this type of show. Artists love to play at the Vilar not only for the acoustics, but also because they can interact with the crowd.

This Friday marks the second in a series of seven shows at the Vilar. The Underground Sound Pass is still available for $125 and that includes Friday’s show and the remaining five concerts, a drink at each concert and it is transferable. Individual tickets for the show are $35. For more information and a chance to listen to Snider and Elliott’s music, visit www.vilarpac.org.

Fall Fest Spooktacular

It’s time to test out those Halloween costumes! The Town of Gypsum is hosting its annual Fall Fest Spooktacular on Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. Get the kids dressed up and bring them to the Lundgren Amphitheater. A pumpkin patch will set the scene on the lawn along with a haunted maze. The Town of Gypsum will host carnival games and prizes. Grab some free popcorn and hot dogs courtesy of Costco.

There is a pumpkin carving contest, but the entry forms were due Thursday. You can still enjoy the creativity since the pumpkins will be on display on Saturday.  Make a note of this deadline in case your kids really wanted to be a part of it and register earlier next year.

This event is free to the public. For more information, go to www.townofgypsum.com.

Vail Valley Fine Arts Show

View local art this Friday during the Vail Valley Fine Arts Show while enjoying a little jazz music and a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Colorado Mountain College campus in Edwards.

For the sixth year in a row, Colorado Mountain College and the Vail Valley Art Guild will join forces to present a unique look at work by local artists, sculptors, ceramic artists, photographers and woodworkers.

This year’s show was judged by the owners of Vail International Gallery and the Raitman Gallery and includes 2-D abstracts, portraits, figures, landscapes and still life in both painting and photography mediums as well as 3-D sculpture and functional pieces.

Many of the artists and photographers on exhibit participate in classes and workshops sponsored by Colorado Mountain College and the Vail Valley Art Guild. 

In addition to featuring more than 234 works by 59 artists in an array of mediums, the exhibit will feature refreshments – including nice cheese and smoked salmon – and jazz for patrons to enjoy while perusing the art. The Jeremiah Johnson Jazz Quartet will provide live music. Side note: besides playing tenor sax, Johnson is the assistant dean of the art department at the college.

Can’t make it on Friday night? The Vail Valley Fine Art Show is currently on exhibit and the artwork is available for purchase through November 15th at Colorado Mountain College. Visit www.coloradomtn.edu/campuses/vail-valley-edwards for more information.

Sing and tip for charity

A couple of charity events you won’t want to miss include the Tip a Cop event for Special Olympics and a Karaoke Cafe that benefits the Vail Performing Arts Academy.

Police officers “protect and serve” but they will be concentrating on the serving portion of that motto at the Blue Plate in Avon on Saturday.

Officers and deputies will serve patrons at the Blue Plate for tips. Tips received go to support Special Olympic athletes with intellectual disabilities. Dinner will be served between 5 and 9 p.m. Call for a reservation and help out Eagle County law enforcement teams who are raising money and awareness for the Special Olympics of Colorado. If you wish to donate online go to give.specialolympics.org.

Also on Saturday, the Vail Performing Arts Academy is inviting you to sing for your supper, sort of, with a Karaoke competition and a delicious dinner. Diners will enjoy a New York Little Italy-themed buffet for $25 (kids 10 years old and younger are $15).

The Vail Performing Arts Academy is dedicated to providing theatrical, educational and cultural experiences for the youth of Eagle County. Since 1995, the Vail Performing Arts Academy has done performances ranging from “Grease” in 1998 to “Frozen, Jr.” this past summer.

Hovey & Harrison will be the place to be if you want to let your talents shine, but do be aware that this IS the Vail Performing Arts Academy, so there may be some stiff competition with all the good singers in the house. All ages are welcome and there are prizes for the best performers. You can also just sit back and relax and enjoy the entertainment while supporting the Academy’s year-round programs. The event runs from 5:30 to 9 p.m. To buy tickets and learn more visit www.vpaa.org.

Restaurant deals, concert deals, gear deals and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 10/4/19

Underground Sound Concert Series

It’s deal season this time of year and the discounts aren’t just reserved for restaurants, spa treatments and hotel stays. Add concerts at the Vilar Performing Arts Center to that list of off-season specials.

The Underground Sound Concert Series returns to Beaver Creek this weekend and lasts until Nov. 11. This annual fall event has been dubbed “love for the locals” and is a way for the Vilar Performing Arts Center to provide some great acts at an affordable price this time of year.

For 10 years, the Vilar has been hosting a variety of musical genres ranging from bluegrass to funk, blues, indie folk rock, soul and country. Past performers have included Brandi Carlile, Jerry Douglas, Elephant Revival, Lukas Nelson, Gregory Alan Isakov and Chris Thile.

Concert tickets are affordably priced between $28 and $38 for individual shows, but the real deal is in the Underground Sound Pass. For $125 you get seven shows, a drink at each show and it’s transferable, so you can share it with co-workers, friends or neighbors. Maybe trade out baby-sitting with your neighbors and enjoy a few shows this autumn.

Dates of the concerts range from weekends to weeknights so you can enjoy a concert experience as a date night to celebrate the end of the week or take a break from the daily grind and squeeze in a show during the workweek.

Discover new music this weekend. Ranky Tanky will kick off the season on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Ranky Tanky hails out of Charleston, SC and is known for its jazz, funk, gospel and R&B sounds. For information on all of the artists, the Underground Sound Pass or individual tickets, go to www.vilarpac.org.

Vail Beaver Creek Restaurant Week

Vail Beaver Creek Restaurant Week continues through Sunday. Take advantage of the $20.19 specials at over 40 restaurants in Vail and Beaver Creek along with deals on hotels and spa treatments.

Last week, I had an opportunity to try the four-course meal at Tavern on the Square at the Arrabelle. It was a delicious deal that started out with an Italian white bean soup, followed by a baked burrata with Pomodoro sauce. For the third course, I got to choose my entrée. It was hard to pick between seafood cacciatore, lamb T-bone or beef bourguignon, so the chef let me try all three. For dessert, I saved room for autumn spice churros and the sugary spice and texture were a great way to complete the meal.

The menu changes nightly, so see what they are cooking up at the Tavern. The chefs have been having a lot of fun trying out new dishes and some of them may remain on the menu for the winter.

I also stopped into La Nonna Ristorante, which is offering its house-made pasta dishes for $20.19. Chef-owner Simone Reatti and his staff have been busy cranking out the same wonderful menu at discount prices as a thank you to the locals and visitors who have supported them since they opened La Nonna last winter.

I tried a few dishes on the menu, including spaghettini crostacei, ravioli tre funghi, and malfatti di ricotta. They’re so tasty, you may want to order two.

I can’t eat at all the restaurants during Vail Beaver Creek Restaurant Week, so I enlisted the help of Casey Russell, our arts and entertainment editor at the Vail Daily. Casey dined at Gessner at the new Grand Hyatt Vail (formerly Hotel Talisa) and tried sourdough toast with charred peppers, local honeycomb and local goat cheese-which used milk taken in both the morning and the afternoon for two different flavor profiles.

Casey loved the vegan butternut squash soup and the tomato and foraged mushroom tagliatelle with basil cream sauce, which in the winter, becomes a truffle sauce.

For an indulgent dessert, Casey said to try the peaches and cream cake with pistachio crust and mousse at Gessner. Its sweet flavor and light texture pairs well with fresh Palisade peaches and meringue kisses that decorate the slice.

Wherever you decide to dine, call for reservations in advance. These deals are very popular and you don’t want to be turned away if the restaurants can’t fit you in. For a full list of specials, go to www.diningwithaltitude.com.

Gear sales and swaps

Did you lose your gloves last year? Are you due for a new snowboard? Have your kids outgrown their snow pants? If you answered affirmatively to any of those questions now is the time to buy while area sports stores are having gear sales and swaps. Here are a few going on this weekend:

Sun & Ski Sports

Get the best deals of the year during the 3rd annual First Tracks Ski and Snowboard Blowout Sale. Ski and snowboard equipment and apparel will be discounted up to 50% off throughout the store through this Sunday. Make sure you ask them about how you can win a pair of Liberty Skis this weekend, too.

The junior ski and snowboard seasonal lease program is going on as well. You can lease skis, boots and poles or a snowboard, bindings and boots for $99. That price goes up to $119 after Nov. 29. Visit www.sunandski.com/avon-co for more information.

Charter Sports

The Empty the Warehouse Sale will be held at Charter Sports at the Christie Lodge location in Avon. They will be selling a lot of gear and that additional merchandise will spill out of the store and into the parking lot of the Christie Lodge, so be prepared to shop around to find everything you need.

Discounts start at 50% off on winter gear, outerwear and accessories. The discounts will increase as the weekend goes on, but keep in mind that sizes and brands and models of gear may be picked over. The event kicks off on Friday and runs through Sunday between the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Alpine Quest Sports

Thinking about getting into a new sport or upgrading your equipment? Now is the time to buy and sell new and used AT, Tele and Splitboard skis, boots and bindings. 

The Alpine Touring, Telemark and Splitboard Swap is this weekend at Alpine Quest Sports in Edwards. Drop off gear on Friday before 6 p.m. Sell your gear and get 100% of the selling price in store credit or 70% of the selling price in cash.

The annual sale and swap runs until Sunday. Call 970-926-3867 for more details or stop by their store in Edwards.

Oktoberfest in Gypsum

If you are considering buying a dirndl or lederhosen, I am going to encourage you to do so because you’ll have plenty of opportunities to wear the traditional grab. In Eagle County, we have had five, count ‘em, five Oktoberfest celebrations in the last six weeks (and that is not even counting the Oktoberfest celebrations in other mountain towns or in Denver). Things move down valley to Gypsum for this weekend’s Oktoberfest.

The Gypsum Chamber of Commerce, the town of Gypsum and a host of other sponsors are bringing out the traditional Bavarian costumes, games, brats and pastries. There is even a Bonfire Brewing beer named especially for the event: Gyptoberfest.

The Lundgren Theater will play host to the festival, which is free and open to the public on Saturday from 1-5 p.m. There will be music by A Band Called Alexis. Free pumpkins will be available in the pumpkin patch. For more information, visit www.gypsumchamber.com.

If you want to bring a taste of Oktoberfest home with you, stop by West Vail Liquor Mart and take advantage of some seasonal brew sampling. West Vail Liquor Mart will have oompah music, tons of giveaways and plenty of Oktoberfest beers to try on Friday from 4 to 6 p.m. German-style pretzels with beer cheese and mustard options will also be served. Learn more at www.westvail.com.

Fire Department Open House

In honor of National Fire Prevention Week, Vail Fire and Emergency Services is inviting the community to visit the West Vail Station for an open house on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

The West Vail Fire House has become quite the attraction for kids. During the open house, kids can view the fire engines and the station up close. There will also be a kid’s obstacle course. Free hot dogs and chips will be served as well.

In recognition of National Fire Prevention Week, activities will center around fire safety information on smoke alarms, exit drills and carbon monoxide alarms presented by the Fire Prevention Division.

National Fire Prevention Week is Oct. 6 through 12 and this year’s theme is “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape – Plan and Practice Your Escape.” This campaign encourages everyone to create a home escape plan and not only come up with the plan but also practice it.

Between the open house at the West Vail Fire Station and school visits, representatives from Vail Fire will educate students on the importance of drawing a map of their home and practicing fire drills with family members. During the sessions, firefighters will be teaching children about closing doors to slow the spread of smoke, flames and heat. Students will also learn about staying outside of a building and not going back inside to retrieve belongings.

Get funky with Ranky Tanky at the Vilar’s Underground Sound series this weekend

Ranky Tanky kicks off the Vilar Performing Arts’ Center’s Underground Sound fall concert series. With a bright and fresh sound influenced by jazz, gospel, funk and R&B, the South Carolina-born band comes to Beaver Creek on Saturday, Oct. 5. The show starts at 7:30 p.m.

While the band takes influence from African American styles of music, its main goal is to celebrate and illuminate the history and sounds of Gullah. Gullah is a style of folk music that used to be very popular in the coastal areas of South Carolina, Georgia and Northern Florida. Slaves brought over from West Africa in the Antebellum period taught their children Gullah music as a way of staying connected to their roots. Those unfamiliar with Gullah might know the classic “Wade in the Water,” which has Gullah roots.

In the absence of drums – which were forbidden by slave-owners who feared drums could be used to conspire against them – slaves would sing and bang walking sticks on the floor, creating the typical a capella-style Gullah sound in the absence of traditional instruments. Translated from the original Gullah language, Gullah means “a people blessed by God” and Ranky Tanky means “work it” or “get funky.”

The members of Ranky Tanky first met at the College of Charleston and formed a jazz quartet in 1998. After going their separate ways for more than 15 years, the members reconnected when Clay Ross –vocalist, guitarist and the only white member in the group – suggested that they play versions of classic Gullah songs.

“Man, I’ve been listening to that since I can remember, since I was, like, 3, you know?,” said Charlton Singleton, the band’s trumpet player in an interview with NPR Music. He grew up hearing the music at church. “It was every day. So, you know, you just – after a while, you figure, you know, everybody knows it or that’s just the norm for me.”

While some of the other band members didn’t grow up completely immersed in Gullah culture, they heard similar tunes at church with similar messages.

“You can hear at least something in one of those songs where, you know, it’s a – the cry. It’s a cry for, you know, help from the Lord or it’s something that has something to do with spirituality,” Singleton said.

Ranky Tanky released an album this year, “Good Time,” which updates classic gospel songs for the 21st century. It starts with “Stand By Me,” (not the Ben E. King song) and adds brass and percussion for create a piece that’s topped jazz charts at Billboard, Amazon and iTunes. The album throws it back with the closing track, “Shoo Lie Loo,” which uses only vocals and percussion as it would have 300 years ago. Concert-goers will likely hear several tracks off the new album, in addition to favorites from 2017’s self-titled album like “That’s Alright” and “Ranky Tanky.”

Colloquially known as the “love for the locals” series, tickets for each Underground Sound show are under $40 for stand-alones, but there’s also a “seven shows & seven drinks for $125” deal, where passholders get one ticket and one drink for each show in the series. The best part is, the tickets are transferrable, so split between a few friends, the cost goes down significantly.

If you go…

What: Ranky Tanky at Underground Sound

When: Saturday, Oct. 5, 7:30 p.m.

Where: The Vilar Performing Arts Center, Beaver Creek

Cost: $38 for single tickets, or do the 7 shows & 7 drinks for $125 pass.

More information: Visit vilarpac.org or call 970-845-8497 for more information.

Gluten-free folks and vegetarians, rejoice: here’s what you can eat at Vail Beaver Creek Restaurant Week

Restaurant Week in the Vail Valley is an undeniably good time. What’s better than eating old favorites and new specials from the best restaurnants Vail and Beaver Creek have to offer? But for those who follow an alternative diet, planning outings like these usually pose a challenge.

Here’s a list of where to get gluten-free and vegetarian options at Fall Restaurant Week $20.19, which runs from now until Oct. 6.

Gluten-free

10th Mountain Whiskey: A tasting flight and a bowl of mixed nuts goes for $20.19.

8100 Mountainside Bar and Grill: Lunch options include a kale salad. Though it comes with a draft beer, gluten-free diners could bring a beer nerd friend or ask for a substitution.

Beaver Creek Chophouse / Vail Chophouse: For lunch, grab a house salad with a Mountain Cheeseburger with one topping – ask for their gluten-free bread – and a house dessert for $20.19. For dinner, both restaurants are also serving a Loch Duart Scottish Salmon with summer sweet corn succotash, rock shrimp and roasted corn sauce or a Slow Cooked Pork Shank with green apple mustard, mascarpone polenta and fennel slaw.

Blue Moose: Grab all-day food specials with a Guenoc Chard, Cabernet or Sangria for $2.19.

Bol: This eatery is offering 20.19% off the entire check – pair a sweet discount with poke, wings or gluten-free flatbread.

Buffalo’s @ Ritz Carlton Bachelor Gulch: The food options – cauliflower masala with a cashew raita and the cast-iron nachos – are gluten-free or can be made gluten-free. But each entrée comes with a Colorado draft beer, so try asking for subs or donate your beer to a friend.

Boneyard: The two other menu options are burritos, so gluten-free people should try the low roasted prime rib with garlic mashed potato and asparagus or the short rib platter with garlic mashed and broccolini.

Elway’s Steakhouse: Try the USDA prime New York Strip, Prime Rib, Vancouver Island salmon or half a roasted chicken for $20.19.

Fall Line: This restaurant is also offering $20.19 entrees, or grab 2 cocktails for $20.19. The steak frites, the shrimp pad thai and the Vietnamese noodle bowl are all gluten-free, and so are most of the starters.

Garfinkel’s: Go classic with a rib eye, salad, baked potato and a vegetable. It comes with either a draft beer or a soda, so naturally, gluten-free people will want to go for the soda.

Gessner: Sip on $20.19 select bottles of wine, and pair that with two-for-one entrées when you order an appetizer. Stick around for fall spa specials if you’re stopping in after a busy day of hiking, climbing or other activity.

Golden Eagle Inn: With select entrées at $20.19, and a menu that contains several gluten-free options, diners should head over to check out what’s on tap.

Grill on the Gore: Take 20.19% off the entire bill, but the discount is only valid from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and diners must mention restaurant week to receive the discount.         

La Bottega: Take $20.19 off select pastas and entrees, and most pasta dishes can be made gluten-free.

La Tour: Start with two cocktails for $20.19, and pair it with select $20.19 entrees. Go traditional with a chicken Paillard, or warm up with the roasted maitake mushroom and lettuce curry.

Leonora: Choose three items off the small plates menu for $20.19. All menu items are labeled, and bonus, many of them are also nut-free and dairy-free. Keep in mind that the deal did not apply on Friday, but will continue until Oct. 6.

Matsuhisa: Pair a miso soup with a three-compartment bento box for $20.19. Get creative with some sushi and sashimi.

Mirabelle: Chef Daniel Joly’s Colorado lamb meat bowl with local mushrooms and potato gratin is sure to bring an aire of luxe to your dining plans.

Moe’s Original BBQ: Share a Double Wide Family Pack with three to four people. The whole spread includes one pound of pork, chicken or turkey, two pint-size sides and choice of four buns or cornbread. Skip or share the bread it for a gluten-free meal.

Montauk Seafood Grill: Take 40.38% off full-size entrees for double the savings. Menu highlights include shrimp and scallop fra diavolo and steamed Alaskan crab.

Pepi’s: For a $20.19 lunch, choose any two items off the “Sandwiches” or “European Specialty” menus: gluten-free folks can eat veal, pork or smoked buffalo brats or leberkäse, a mashed potato dish with spinach and a fried egg. Moving into the evening, then gluten-free entree option for $20.19 include is the double veal or pork bratwurst.

Root & Flower: Toast to your small bowl of olives with a glass of Italian bubbly: the bar is offering a bottle of prosecco and olives for $20.19.

Russell’s: Take 20.19% off of the entire check, but leave the King Crab off the table, because it’s not included in the deal.

Splendido: Wine lovers can snag bottles of Naonis or Prosecco for $20.19.

Sweet Basil: Pair a small plate and a drink for $20.19. Gluten-free options include a half-dozen oysters with a glass of sparkling wine or the Salmon Tataki and their special Perfect Margarita.

Swiss Chalet: The restaurant at the Sonnenalp Hotel is offering assorted entrées for $20.19.

Tavern on the Square: The restaurant is offering a four-course chef’s tasting menu that changes nightly, so there’s a chance that items could fit dietary needs. Call ahead to confirm.

Terra Bistro: Try a buy-one, get-one-for-$20.19 deal on house entrees, many of which are gluten-free.

The George: All entrees are $20.19, including the king crab and the surf-and-turf. Both are gluten-free, and would pair nicely with happy hour drink specials.

The Met Kitchen: This restaurant leaves it open for creative menu selections with signature cocktails for $20.19 and 20.19% off the total bill. There are plenty of options, including the lobster tacos on a corn tortilla.

Toscanini Ristorante: All entrees are $20.19 – and they have a whole gluten-free menu. Check it out on their website.

Up the Creek: Entrees are $20.19. For gluten-free options, try the pan-seared scallops with mushrooms, Brussels sprouts, grilled sweet corn, basil, balsamic and buffalo mozzarella.

Vail Beaver Creek Restaurant Week kicks off Friday, Sept. 27, and spans 10 days.
Townsend Bessent | Daily file photo |

Vegetarian

10th Mountain Whiskey: A tasting flight and a bowl of mixed nuts goes for $20.19.

8100 Mountainside Bar and Grill: Lunch options include a kale salad, and it comes with a draft beer.

Big Bear Bistro: Pair two crepes with a bottle of wine for $20.19, or do two smothered burritos – plant-based options available – with two coffees for the same price.

Blue Moose: Pizza and beer is the perfect pairing, and get any 3-topping slice and a Colorado draft beer for $2.19 each.

Bol: Take 20.19% off the entire check – try the sweet pea ravioli for a full meal, or pick and choose from the extensive list of snacks and shareables, many of which are plant-based.

Buffalo’s @ Ritz Carlton Bachelor Gulch: The food options – cauliflower masala with a cashew raita and the cast-iron nachos – are gluten-free or can be made gluten-free. But each entrée comes with a Colorado draft beer, so try asking for subs or donate your beer to a friend.

Boneyard: Chow down on some enchiladas with black beans, lettuce, sour cream and pico de gallo with a guajillo red sauce. There is also a special on the classic Boot Burrito. Both are served with meat, chicken and pulled pork respectively, but diners could ask to omit those ingredients.

Fall Line: This restaurant is also offering $20.19 entrees, or grab 2 cocktails for $20.19. The noodle bowl is vegetarian, but that’s it for the entrees.

Gessner: Sip on $20.19 select bottles of wine, and pair that with two-for-one entrées when you order an appetizer. Stick around for fall spa specials if you’re stopping in after a busy day of hiking, climbing or other activity.

Golden Eagle Inn: Plant-based eaters of all varieties can get the vegan zucchini sautée, normally $30, for $20.19. It’s also gluten-free, too.

Grill on the Gore: Take 20.19% off the entire bill, but the discount is only valid from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and diners must mention restaurant week to receive the discount.          The menu is fairly traditional, and most of the vegetarian options are salads and appetizers.

La Bottega: Take $20.19 off select pastas and entrees. Vegetarians should try the the spinach and ricotta cannelloni, the fettuccine puttanesca with Kalamata olives in red sauce or the truffle gnocchi.

La Nonna: All pastas are $20.19, and half of them are vegetarian. Try the spaghetti crudaiola with fresh tomato, arugula, garlic and extra virgin olive oil for a lighter meal, or go all-in with the malfatti de ricotta: spinach ricotta dumplings, heirloom tomatoes, fresh basil and straciatella cheese.

Leonora: Choose three items off the small plates menu for $20.19. All menu items are labeled with dietary preferences. The summer farro risotto and watermelon and heirloom tomato salad will satisfy everyone, including vegetarians. Keep in mind that the deal did not apply on Friday, but will continue until Oct. 6.

Matsuhisa: Pair a miso soup with a three-compartment bento box for $20.19. Get creative with some sushi and sashimi.

The Met Kitchen: Get two signature cocktails for $20.19 and 20.19% off the total bill. There are plenty of options, including the vegan plate of the day.

Mountain Standard: Pair green hatch chile pimento cheese and any two draft beers for $20.19.

Pivot 62: Select any pizza with a glass of house red or white wine or a draft beer for $20.19. Veggie pizzas include a mushroom pizza topped with a generous pile of arugula.        

Root & Flower: Toast to your small bowl of olives with a glass of Italian bubbly: the bar is offering a bottle of prosecco and olives for $20.19.

Splendido: Wine lovers can snag bottles of Naonis or Prosecco for $20.19.

Sweet Basil: Pair a small plate and a drink for $20.19. The only vegetarian option is fried cheese sticks with a Pinkus beer.

Swiss Chalet: The restaurant at the Sonnenalp Hotel is offering assorted entrées for $20.19.

Tavern on the Square: The restaurant is offering a four-course chef’s tasting menu that changes nightly, so there’s a chance that items could fit dietary needs. Call ahead to confirm.

Terra Bistro: Try a buy-one, get-one-for-$20.19 deal on house entrees, many of which are plant-based and vegetarian.

Two Arrows: Start the morning right with two avocado toasts and two 12 oz. drip coffees for $20.19.

Toscanini Ristorante: All entrees are $20.19. Go nuts on some meat-free ravioli, capellini and bucatini – all fun shapes of pasta.

Up the Creek: Entrees are $20.19. For vegetarians, the option is caprese gnocchi.

Horticultural Therapy offered through Vail Valley Salvation Army

In addition to all the good things the Vail Valley Salvation Army does, horticultural therapy can now be added to the list. Patricia Esperon, a master gardener and garden programs manager for the Vail Valley Salvation Army, is excited to bring this versatile modality to the public and help out various groups.

Horticultural Therapy is a formal practice that uses plants, horticultural activities, and the garden landscape to promote well being for its participants.  

“Dr. Benjamin Rush, who is recognized as the “Father of American Psychiatry,” was first to document the positive effect working in the garden had on individuals with mental illness in the 19th century,” Esperon said.  

According to the American Horticultural Therapy Association, rehabilitative care of hospitalized war veterans significantly expanded acceptance of the practice in the 1940s and 1950s. Today, horticultural therapy is accepted as a beneficial and effective therapeutic modality. It is used within a broad range of rehabilitative, vocational and community settings.

“This is just another modality that is used just like equine, art, sound or music therapy. I love that this is so mobile, we can bring people to the gardens here at the Salvation Army, or we can bring plants to the public in small pots,” Esperon said.

For example, a nursing home might do a horticultural therapy flower arranging session. Or a horticultural therapy practitioner might do a propagation session with a group of adults with cognitive challenges. “Horticultural therapy can be utilized by just about anyone, anywhere,” Esperon said.

Esperon feels fortunate to have the support of the Salvation Army. “We not only have this great garden and greenhouse, but we also have the ability to share this resource and the practice of horticultural therapy with others,” Esperon said.

Some potential programs Esperon would like to implement include helping adults with cognitive challenges, support group workshops, grief workshops, restorative justice, social and food justice programs, programs for senior citizens, veterans, people with traumatic brain injuries and those struggling with substance abuse. 

“Just digging in the dirt has been shown to release serotonin in the brain, and serotonin is thought to regulate anxiety, happiness and mood,” Esperon said. “Being in the garden, sharing time with each other is really therapeutic. It’s amazing what people will share when they are just deadheading daisies.”

If you would like to find out more, contact Esperon at info@salvationarmyvail.org or by calling the Salvation Army at 970-748-0704.

Vail Oktoberfest, Eagle River clean up, car shows and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 9/6/19

Oktoberfest in Lionshead

After kicking off Oktoberfest last weekend in Beaver Creek, the annual Bavarian holiday comes east. Vail Oktoberfest will be set up this Friday through Sunday in Lionshead, where the Arrabelle provides the perfect backdrop with its Bavarian-style architecture. 

Festival guests will enjoy classic Bavarian fare including brats, schnitzel sandwiches, spaetzle, pretzels and more. No Oktoberfest celebration would be complete without authentic Oktoberfest beer and Vail Oktoberfest is proud to serve Spaten.

Come for the beer and brats, but stay for the entertainment. Each day offers an array of music from the traditional oompah-style bands like Helmut Fricker and the Rhinlanders Band to ‘80s cover tunes from local band Rewind. 

You’ll also notice that it is all fun and games at Vail Oktoberfest. Enter the brat eating or stein lifting competitions, try keg bowling or see if your outfit is authentic enough to win top honors in the costume contest. Bring the kids to the Bavarian Kinder Club for games and crafts from 12 to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. For the full schedule of events, please visit www.vailoktoberfest.com.

Races in Eagle County

There will be plenty of opportunities to test your mettle against other athletes both up valley and down valley this weekend. Major League Triathlon returns to Avon and the Mountain Rats Trail running races are back in Eagle this weekend. 

Major League Triathlon isn’t just a competition, it’s a show that is spectator friendly where pro triathletes race a mixed-race relay format with abbreviated swimming, biking and running courses before tagging their teammate to race the next leg. But the event isn’t just for the pros, amateurs are welcome to come out and try it as well. There will be everything from the 5k to an IPA run to an Avon Beer Mile run and a splash and dash race for the kids. Bark in the Park allows you to bring your dog along while you run a little over 3 miles in Nottingham Park. 

On Saturday, qualifying rounds will be going on all day with the championships taking place starting at 5 p.m. Locals will get one more chance to see a super-sprint mixed-relay triathlon before the event makes it Olympic debut in Tokyo in 2020.

Live free concerts by The Larry Keel Experience and Trout Steak Revival round out the festival with concerts each night. For more information, go to www.majorleaguetri.com

If trail running is more your thing, the Mountain Rats trail racing event down valley will offer a marathon, a 50k run and a “heavy half”, which is a little longer than the typical half marathon. There is also a 5k held on a relatively flat path that is paved where you can walk, jog, run or race for time. 

All events will start and end in Eagle Ranch. Color Coffee will serve as the kick-off and return point during the races and the after part will be at Boneyard (formerly the Dusty Boot in Eagle Ranch). For a complete schedule and registration information, visit www.geminiadventures.com.

Vail Automotive Classic

If you like cars, you’ll love the opportunities to see some great classics or newer makes and models at this year’s Vail Automotive Classic in Vail.

Each year, the Vail Automotive Classic celebrates the art of the machine with a series of automotive events in the Vail Valley. Their largest event and fundraiser takes place every September and brings car collectors and admirers of all ages out to talk cars and raise a little money for charities.

On Saturday, bring your prized vehicle to Mountain Plaza at Gondola One from 9-11 a.m. for Cars and Coffee. View the vehicles and talk about everything from Bugattis to Bentleys and muscle cars to Maseratis. 

On Sunday, the vintage and new vehicles will be on display in Vail Village from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The marque brand for 2019 is BMW, so expect to see some old and new cars and motorcycles on display. There will be judged categories as well as a people’s choice award, so cast your vote for your favorite vehicle. For more information, call Mark Bergman at 518-232-6544.

Eagle River Cleanup

By donating just three hours of your time, you can help improve the watershed in Eagle County. Saturday marks the 25th annual Eagle River Cleanup, which goes beyond the Eagle River. Nearly 70 miles of banks along the Eagle River, Gore Creek, the upper Colorado River and tributaries are part of this countywide effort. 

The Eagle River Watershed Council organizes the event, which will see over 350 volunteers come out from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. The Eagle River Watershed Council strives to protect and enhance the high-quality natural, scenic and economic values that the rivers and tributaries provide to the citizens, visitors and wildlife of the Eagle River and Colorado River watersheds located in Eagle County.

“The efforts of hundreds of volunteers are very evident throughout the valley after our cleanup events,” said Kate Isaacson with the Eagle River Watershed Council. “A lot of the trash found along our waterways contains plastics or other harmful chemicals which degrade and make their way into our water system.”

As a thank you to all the volunteers, presenting sponsor Vail Resorts Epic Promise will host a barbecue after the clean up from 12 to 2 p.m. at the Broken Arrow Cafe in Arrowhead. There will also be live music with The Runaway Grooms and free beer from Bonfire Brewing. 

Each participant will also get a commemorative t-shirt and the teams are asked to bring in their most interesting piece of trash to the event for a chance to win the Most Unusual Trash Award. To learn more contact the Eagle River Watershed Council at www.erwc.org

First Fridays Art Exhibits 

The Vail Valley Art Guild will showcase the photography of a local high school student as part of its First Friday exhibit and reception series at the Guild’s studio at 291 Main Street in Minturn. 

Celia Barrie, a sophomore at Battle Mountain High School, will exhibit photos taken while on a recent safari in Africa. Accompanied by her Richmond, Virginia, grandparents, Celia traveled to Qatar, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa and viewed a variety of landscapes and wild animals.

The event is free and open to the public on Friday between 5:30 and 8 p.m. and is made possible by the Vail Valley Art Guild’s Outreach program, which provides local venues for young artists and photographers to exhibit their work. The Vail Valley Art Guild also sponsors lectures, field trips and workshops throughout the year. For additional information, visit www.vailvalleyartguild.com.

Also on Friday, check out Gallery 8 Arts in Avon as they showcase the artwork of Shen, the original West Coast graffiti girl at their First Friday event. 

Shen used to call the Vail Valley home and now resides and Texas, but just came from South Dakota where she was painting a mural in a school at the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It’s all part of her new Street Art Evangelism program where Shen goes into areas that are depressed or hurting and strives to bring hope, light and love to those communities through her art. 

Shen is known for her portraits, especially portraits of musicians from pretty much every genre. Welcome Shen back to the Vail Valley at the reception between 4 and 7 p.m. Gallery 8 Arts is located at 150 E. Beaver Creek Blvd., between the UPS Store and Green Elephant Juicery. For more information, go to www.gallery8arts.com.

Pro bike racing, live music, trail runs at 10k feet and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 8/23/19

Colorado Classic bike race in Avon

Professional bike racing returns to Colorado and this time it’s the ladies’ turn to take to the streets and steeps throughout a four-city tour that includes Avon this Friday. The Colorado Classic presented by VF Corporation will be the only UCI standalone women’s stage race in North America; raising the bar with quadrupled prize purse, team stipends, live streaming and longer, more challenging routes.

Avon represents Stage Two of the Colorado Classic and the women will complete seven laps that are five miles in length around the town of Avon before the final lap, which is 15 miles long and will take riders up and down some of the steepest roadways in Eagle County: Strawberry Park Road and Daybreak Ridge Road.

To add an extra element of suspense, there will be a Bonus Cash Lap where you can donate money and half of the donation will go to the winning rider and the other half will go to a different charity during each stage. The charity for the Avon stage is the locally-based Youth Initiative Project, created by local professional skier Chris Anthony. Anthony’s goal is to have the Avon Stage be the biggest moneymaker of all the Bonus Cash Laps held at the other stages. Stage One was held on Thursday in Steamboat Springs, Stage Three takes place in Golden on Saturday and Stage Four will be in Denver on Sunday. To donate, go to www.accelevents.com/e/avon.

Here are some tips on where to watch:

Start/Finish Line at Lake Street Nottingham Park:

Enjoy the Bike and Lifestyle Expo area in Nottingham Park while cheering on riders during the first seven laps from the start/finish line on Lake Street.

Main Street Mall and Benchmark Road: 

Catch the racers as they sprint through seven laps and, on the final lap, fight to the finish line. You can also pick up official Colorado Classic merchandise by Primal.

Village Road:

Line the sidewalk and make some noise for the final lap as the peloton begins their uphill battle towards Bachelor Gulch, they’ll fly by again on their descent as they race toward the finish line. 

Daybreak Ridge Road at Village to Village Trail:

Encourage racers as they battle it out for Queen of the Mountain while tackling one of Colorado’s most notorious climbs: Daybreak Ridge. This Fan Zone is accessible by foot only and offers a prime opportunity to hike or bike your way to the cheering section on this landmark.

For more details including the schedule of multiple road closures throughout Avon, Beaver Creek and Bachelor Gulch and how to watch the race if you can’t be there in person, go to www.avon.org/coclassic.

José González at the Vilar

The name may not be familiar – yet – but the music of José González will jog the memory of those who have heard his songs on shows like “The O.C.,” “One Tree Hill,” Parenthood,” and Ben Stiller’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” over the past several years. This Argentinian-Swedish singer-songwriter takes the stage for the first time at the Vilar Performing Arts Center on Saturday at 8 p.m. Here’s what the Vilar staff is saying about this Saturday’s concert:

“José González has a way of drawing in listeners with his beautiful voice. He’s known for the intimate nature of his performances which is one of the reasons we knew we had to have him on our stage,” said Ruthie Hamrick, marketing manager for the Vilar Performing Arts Center. “His lyrics are truly moving and if you don’t know him yet, he headlines festivals in Europe, so being able to host him for a stop on his U.S. tour is an honor.”

“We’re also happy about the addition of Colorado-based musician Covenhoven who will open the show. He has steadily been making a name for himself and we’re excited to see where his career will take him,” said Kim Hannold, programming director for the Vilar.

“He has been picking up momentum in the U.S. and filling venues across the front range,” added Duncan Horner, executive director of the Vilar. In fact, González’s show at the Denver Botanical Gardens is sold out on Sunday.

Get your tickets for Saturday’s show by visiting www.vilarPAC.org or call the box office at 970-845-8497.

Eagle Music Festival

With the school year upon us, many families will be staying in town this weekend. If you are looking for a fun way to gather and be entertained, then head on over to the Boneyard in Eagle for the Eagle Music Festival: We Are In This Together on Saturday. 

This family-friendly event is a fundraiser benefitting the Eagle River Youth Coalition and the Red Ribbon Project. The Eagle River Youth Coalition’s mission is to continuously and collaboratively improve the lives of youth in the most powerful ways possible. The Red Ribbon Project’s mission is to promote healthier lives by empowering the community to reduce teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS and other STIs. The two nonprofits teamed up formally in 2017 and they are excited to expand their collaboration efforts.

“We have seen our efforts grow tremendously and believe that together we are better serving the community,” said Mikayla Curtis of the Red Ribbon Project.

“Together we are stronger; we don’t duplicate services and we remain committed to providing high-quality services while being fiscally responsible,” added Heather Hower of the Eagle River Youth Coalition.

The event kicks off at 4 p.m. and goes until 10 p.m. During that time, enjoy a raffle, silent auction and music by First Chair, Mysterious Forces and Wave 2 youth band. The silent auction will have items from Vail Resorts, a one-night stay at The Sebastian Vail, stays at The Antlers, Marriott, along with spa, yoga and restaurant gift certificates. There is also a balloon pop where guests can pay $10 and select a balloon to pop and win a fun prize. And, it wouldn’t be family fun without a bounce house, so prepare to tire the kids out during this time.

“Working together we can now say that we’ve educated 4,568 youth in grades five through twelve during in-school prevention programs. We have increased the number of hours spent with children, helping create a positive, safe place for open conversations on sensitive youth issues,” Hower said.

All of the programs are offered free of charge. “There is only more and more of a need for social-emotional and prevention programs, so here we are, hoping to increase our offerings,” Hower said. 

For more information contact either organization at info@EagleYouth.org or info@redribbonproject.org. The Boneyard was formerly The Dusty Boot restaurant in Eagle Ranch near the movie theater.

Run a 10k at 10,000 feet

If you’ve been trail running all summer long, why not test your mettle and sign up for the Dynafit Vail Trail Running Series 10k at 10,000 Feet? Or, if you aren’t quite ready for a 10k at that altitude, there is a 5k as well. Both races are at 8 a.m. on Saturday on Vail Mountain.

The good news is that you don’t have to run all the way up Vail Mountain, both the 5k and 10k start at the top of Gondola One at Mid Vail, which is around 9,000 feet. Racers for both distances will be taken up to elevations around 11,000 feet above sea level before returning to Mid Vail. To keep minds off the pain the lungs and legs might feel, fantastic views of the Gore Range and Mount of the Holy Cross are all available to those who take their gazes off the trail below for a few moments.

All racers must ride up Gondola One. Ride time is estimated at around 12 minutes, so the Vail Rec District recommends runners load the gondola by 7:30 a.m. to get up to the starting line.

After the race, runners are treated to nutritious, local and tasty fuel from Northside Coffee and Kitchen and a custom-designed t-shirt.

Online pre-registration ends at 3 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 23. Day-of registration is available at the base of the gondola from 6:30 to 7:45 a.m. Bib pick up and registration is also available at the Lululemon store in Vail Village from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday.

This is the sixth race of the Dynafit Vail Trail Running Series and the last race is Meadow Gold 5k and 10k race on Sept. 14. For more information about the race and how spectators can view friends and family, visit www.vailrec.com.

Riverwalk Jazz and Walk to End Alzheimer’s fundraiser

Labor Day Weekend marks the big Vail Jazz Party with days of musical acts lined up, but all summer long we’ve received a taste of the musical flavor of jazz with various concerts at venues throughout the Vail Valley and Jazz at Riverwalk has been one of those venues. Friday marks the last concert of the Vail Jazz series. Don’t miss Eef & the Blues Express at 6 p.m. at the outdoor stage along the Eagle River.

Eef & the Blues Express celebrates its 10th year of making music with a Vail Jazz debut. One of Colorado’s premier blues bands, this dynamic five-piece sonic party has seen its popularity increase throughout the U.S. but enjoys particular popularity for its many gigs around the state. They bring a feel-good drive to blues, soul, Motown, New Orleans and a variety of original and cover tunes. Come celebrate Riverwalk’s fifth season of summer parties down by the river at this free show. For more info, go to www.vailjazz.org.

Also at the Riverwalk on Friday, look for the Alzheimer’s Association folks who will be “Painting Riverwalk Purple” for a special fundraiser. Purchase a $25 Purple Value Card in front of Village Market, Riverwalk Theater or Slifer Designs and take advantage of special offers all day and evening from participating Riverwalk merchants. How about 15% off your bill at Main Street Grill, 15% off furnishings at Slifer Designs or 25% off in-stock cycling shorts and short-sleeve cycling tops at The Kind Bikes and Skis? It’s a special sale just for Purple Value Cardholders that day only.

Proceeds from the Purple Value Cards benefit the Vail Valley Walk to End Alzheimer’s on September 28th at Brush Creek Pavilion in Eagle. To learn more about the walk, visit www.act.alz.org.