| VailDaily.com

Soul on the Slopes, swing music, dancing for peace and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 2/3/23

National Brotherhood of Skiers Summit

This weekend kicks off the 50th anniversary of the National Brotherhood of Skiers, which is a nonprofit group that represents Black skiers, riders, and snow sport enthusiasts across the nation. The founders, Ben Finley and Art Clay, met in 1972 and had a vision to create a national Black summit for skiers. One year later, the historic first Black Ski Summit gathering took place in Aspen in 1973. The event comes to Vail Feb. 4-11.

Now, The National Brotherhood of Skiers has dozens of clubs. The nonprofit’s mission is to identify, develop and support athletes of color who will win international and Olympic winter sports competitions representing the United States and to increase participation in winter sports.

In addition to après ski, barbecues, a gospel fest, races and other activities on and off the snow for its members, there are events the public can attend. On Sunday, come to Solaris Plaza for the National Brotherhood of Skiers Opening Ceremony Parade with DJs Kutz, DSmooth, Bsharp and Ike T going on from 3:30 until 5 p.m.

The National Brotherhood of Skiers is celebrating its 50th anniversary Summit event Feb. 4-11 in Vail.
Lamont Joseph White/Courtesy photo

Also on Sunday, plan to head over to the Colorado Snowsports Museum after the parade to hear guest speaker Col. Greg Gadson tell his amazing story of courage in the face of adversity. The National Brotherhood of Skiers has teamed up with the Vail Veterans Program and the Colorado Snowsports Museum to host this event. Col. Gadson is a 25-year career Army officer. In May of 2007, his life was forever changed when, as commander of the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery in Iraq, an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) caused him to lose both legs above the knees and normal use of his right arm and hand.

Col. Gadson has been a participant of the Vail Veterans Program and is also an ambassador of the nonprofit that brings out military injured and their families for healing treatments on the slopes and off that help build confidence and create lifelong connections. This inspiring talk will start at 5 p.m. and there is a $5 suggested donation. For more information, go to SnowsportsMuseum.org.   

On Monday, go back to the Colorado Snowsports Museum and meet artist Lamont Joseph White, who was commissioned to do a piece of art for the town of Vail. His new oil painting, “Towering,” will be on display along with some of his other works and a display about fashion throughout the years with ski outwear from members of the National Brotherhood of Skiers. The meet-and-greet is being held on Monday from 4 – 6 p.m. but the exhibit will be up through the end of the ski season. More works from White can be viewed throughout the month at the Vail Public Library in the Community Room during library hours.

On Tuesday, stay in your warm ski and snowboard clothes after the lifts stop spinning and head over to Golden Peak for Soul on Snow, a concert featuring music by DJ Logic, Mix Master Mike and Ne-Yo. Gates open at 5 p.m. with house music. Drinks and concessions will be on sale at the outdoor venue. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at EventBrite.

Music schedule:

  • DJ Logic: 6 to 7 p.m.
  • Mix Master Mike: 7 – 8 p.m.
  • Ne-Yo: 8 – 9 p.m.

Winter Culinary Weekend

Wine from Outward Wines is poured at the Beaver Creek Winter Culinary Weekend Guided Snowshoe Excursion And Gourmet Luncheon at Grouse Mountain Grill during the 2022 event.
Chris Dillmann/Vail Daily

Foodies, rejoice! The Winter Culinary Weekend is upon us at Beaver Creek. Any city can host a culinary festival, but pair great food with skiing, snowshoeing and views of the Rockies and it brings it to a whole new level.

Celebrity chefs descend upon this idyllic resort and pair up with Beaver Creek’s talent chefs to create fantastic evenings of tasting and learning. During the day, you may find yourself snowshoeing to lunch or skiing all day before an après ski experience. Some events do sell out, so if something you see whets your appetite, jump on getting a ticket right away so you don’t miss out. Here’s just a sampling of the events going on throughout the weekend and a full schedule and chef bios can be viewed at BeaverCreek.com.  

Mediterranean Meets the California Coast Dinner at Citrea – Sat., 6:30-10 p.m.

Menu design by guest chef Gavin Kaysen and host chef Ryan Little. Featuring craft wines from Purlieu Wines, Napa Valley and Cobb Wines, Sonoma Coast with Bryan Lipa.

Fire and Wine Dinner at Crooked Hearth, Park Hyatt – Sat., 6:30-10 p.m.

The Crooked Hearth private dining room will provide the backdrop for an amazing dinner that will delight all your senses with the artistry of host chef Santosh Koradi, guest chef Andrew Zimmern, and winemaker Adam Mariani of Scribe Winery.

Master Wine Class: Nebbiolo at Saddleridge – Fri., 4-5:30 p.m.

You’ll enjoy this type of homework in Friday’s tasting class with six wines featuring the Nebbiolo grape from the Piedmont Wine Region of Italy. 

Pop-Up Après events at Citrea and Hooked – Fri. and Sat., 4 to 5 p.m.

One ticket, one hour, two venues. Guests will enjoy a demo and tasting with chef Ryan Little at Citrea and chef Riley Romanin at Hooked and try a cocktail from the pouring partner that day.

Wolfe Cutlery Demo Tent: Soups Samples with C-CAP (Careers through Culinary Arts Program) – Fri., 3 – 5 p.m.: 

Scholarship winners, Shelbi Johnson by Cristal Torres, will let guests taste their gumbo and Elote.  

Wolfe Cutlery Demo Tent: Chopping Competition – Sat., 3-5 p.m.: 

Hosted by chef Brother Luck, competitors are asked to cut four different veggies: onion, celery, mushrooms and potatoes and the winner will get $1,000 and a custom handmade David Yellowhorse cleaver.

Concerts at Vilar

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy plays at the Vilar Performing Arts Center on Friday.
Andy Rowley/Courtesy photo

It’s a big weekend for concerts at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy will play on Sunday and then Sarah Jarosz will take the stage on Sunday. Both shows will be very different – the nine-piece swing and jazz band getting people up and out of their seats dancing on Friday and then the audience will enjoy a more subdued performance with singer-songwriter Jarosz playing with one other musician accompanying her on Sunday. The two shows will spotlight the versatility of the venue.

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy has been around for over 30 years and has played venues around the world including Lincoln Center, Hollywood Bowl and speaking of bowls, they played the halftime show at the XXXIII Super Bowl in 1999, when John Elway and the Denver Broncos beat the Atlanta Falcons 34-19. The band has played on “Dancing with the Stars” and were featured in Vince Vaughn’s “Swingers,” and in tons of other movies and television shows. Give them a listen on Spotify and you’ll remember hits like, “You & Me & the Bottle Makes 3 Tonight” and “Big and Bad.” The tunes will be enough to get you in the mood to put on your pinstripe suit and dancing shoes and go out on Friday night.

Saxophones, trumpets, clarinets, drums, guitar, bass, piano and tons of vocal harmonies will inspire you to get out of your seat and do a little swing dancing. In fact, the orchestra pit at the Vilar Performing Arts Center will be open for those who want to move to the music.

The show starts at 7 p.m. and tickets start at $45 or $28 for children and students. Visit VilarPAC.org for more information.

Singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sarah Jarosz performs on Sunday night. In contrast to the big band that will be on stage Friday, Jarosz will appear with one other musician, bassist Jeff Picker, and give an intimate performance. The four-time Grammy Award winner will showcase her talents and music from recent albums and collaborations. She is currently touring with Shawn Colvin and Marc Cohn, but taking a break from that tour and doing a stint in the Rockies with shows in Beaver Creek, Aspen and Park City. Give some of her songs a listen on the VilarPAC.org website and book tickets. Showtime is 7 p.m. and tickets start at $35.

Music around town

Terry Armistead and Joe Bianchi of the Turntable Review Duo will play at Remedy Bar Saturday night.
Zach Mahone/Courtesy photo

The ski day isn’t complete without some live music at après ski or into the evening. We’re fortunate to have so many talented performers up and down the valley. Here’s a sampling of who is playing where this weekend.

Red Lion: Nick Steingart – Fri. and Sat., 4-6 p.m. and 9-11 p.m.

Vail Chophouse: Phil Long – Fri. and Sat., 3-6 p.m.

Tavern on the Square: Kevin, Casey and Peter – Sat., 3-6 p.m.

King’s Club at Sonnenalp: Kevin Danzig – Fri., 7-10 p.m.

Brass Bear Bar Park Hyatt Beaver Creek: Brendan McKinney – Fri., 4:30-7:30 p.m.  

The Hythe: Matt Garth – Sat., 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Remedy Bar at Four Seasons Resort Vail: Turntable Review Duo – Sat., 6-9 p.m.

Bridge Street Bar: Jessica Paige and Lucas Parker – Fri., 7:30 p.m.

Shakedown Bar: Jukebox Zero – Fri., 9 p.m.-12 a.m.

Lucky Fridays at Chasing Rabbits: Rotating DJs on Fridays from 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

To find more entertainment, go to the Vail Daily’s Events Calendar on VailDaily.com.

Agave is bringing in electronic music veterans Break Science on Saturday night. Break Science is comprised of Borahm Lee and Adam Deitch. Lee is a keyboardist/producer/jazz pianist and has been a part of Pretty Lights’ live band. Deitch is known for his funky, hip-hop drumming in the band Lettuce. Together, they have been pioneers of the electronic music genre and will bring classic hip-hop, dub, drum n’ bass, dancehall, jazz, funk and other elements to Agave on Saturday night. Doors open at 9:30 p.m. and the show starts at 10:00 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 the day of the show. Go to AgaveAvon.com for more information.

Snowshoe and dance for a cause

The 10th annual Snowshoe for Peru happens this Saturday at Sylvan Lake State Park.
Corozon de Esperanza/Courtesy photo

There are a few charity events going on this weekend that will get you moving. Snowshoe for Peru happens on Saturday morning and the Dance for Universal Peace is Saturday night.

This winter marks the 10th anniversary of Snowshoe for Peru, a fundraiser for Corazón de Esperanza, a nonprofit that assists orphans, at-risk youth and women in Peru with resources, education, nutrition and hope for a future.

The cost is $35 per racer. The 5k run or walk starts at 10 a.m. Packet pick up and on-site registration the day of the event begins at 9:15 a.m.

Please note – no dogs are allowed on the course due to state park regulations. Only snowshoes are allowed, no skis or sleds. 

Registration includes a cooling towel, retro t-shirt, prizes for top finishers, the State Park entrance fee (during the event) and a raffle ticket. Go to SnowshoeForPeru.com to register or learn more about the event and the option to support this event from afar and do it virtually.

The Dances of Universal Peace will start monthly events this Friday in Eagle at 228 Broadway, Unit C. William Day, founder of the group says their intention is simple: raise consciousness and promote peace between diverse groups thru dance. No experience is necessary, just a willingness to dance alongside other community members.

Throughout the evening the dances include a wide variety of circle dances and songs from different cultures around the world. The acoustic guitar will accompany some easy-to-learn lyrics and movements. 

This weekend’s dance starts with a potluck supper at 6 p.m. and the dances start at 6:30 p.m. It’s a bring-your-own type of event, so be prepared to bring your own beverage and eating utensils and plates since they are trying to make it a no-waste event. A donation of $10 per person is appreciated. Kids are invited to join for the first dance on Saturday. If you have any questions, call William Day at (540) 905-3342 or email him at wsdayjr@gmail.com.

Snowshoe tours, ice skating, Yeti Hockey, live music at the Beav and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 1/6/23

Snowshoe tours

New year, new moves. If being more active is on your New Year’s Resolutions list, get outside and snowshoe. Snowshoeing is a low-impact activity that is good for multi-generations. Snowshoes or even devices you attach to your snow boots or hiking boots are a great way to get around. Many of your favorite hiking trails in the summer make great snowshoeing trails in the winter.

Walking Mountains offers free, guided tours out of its Avon Campus six days a week. Mondays through Saturdays from 2 to 3 p.m. join one of the Walking Mountains naturalists and take a quick tour through aspens. Even though you are just a mile off Interstate 70, you feel like you are away from it all. Dress to be outside for an hour and snowshoes will be used if the snow levels allow, otherwise hiking boots or snow boots will do.

You can also take guided tours on top of Vail Mountain. The Nature Discovery Center is offering guided snowshoe tours Wednesdays through Saturdays. Follow along as your guide takes you in and out of the evergreen trees and aspens and shows you far-off vistas like Mount of the Holy Cross and teaches you about animal adaptations. Maybe you’ll see a little critter like an ermine or fox or at least its tracks.

These 90-minute tours depart from the Nature Discovery Center at the top of the Eagle Bahn Gondola (No. 19) and are scheduled from 10:30 a.m. until noon and 1:30 to 3 p.m. Come dressed for the outdoors with warm base layers, snow pants and jacket, hat and gloves. Snowshoes will be provided at the Nature Discovery Center. Please note that while the tour is complimentary, you must have a valid ski pass to get up to the top of the gondola or purchase a Vail Scenic Ride lift ticket to get to where the tour starts. After the tour, you will ride the Eagle Bahn Gondola (No. 19) back down to the base of Lionshead.

Snowshoeing is a great way to exercise in the outdoors this winter.
Walking Mountains/Courtesy photo

Not all snowshoeing has to happen during the day. Snowshoeing at night is an awesome way to experience the outdoors and see things from a different perspective. Walking Mountains is offering its Lunar Snowshoe Experience this season, giving you a chance to get out either under a full moon or a new moon. The first full moon excursion is this Friday.

The program starts at the Walking Mountains Science Center’s campus in Avon, where hot drinks will be available (bring your own mug or water bottle) to stay warm as the group arrives. Once on the trail, you will follow your guide one mile up the Buck Creek trail to an open meadow where a backcountry campfire will be burning and waiting for you. After catching your breath from the climb and warming up around the fire, your guide will lead a half-hour campfire program before descending back down the trail to Walking Mountains Science Center.

For more information, to register and view event dates go to WalkingMountains.org to reserve your spot on a tour.

Ice Skating

There are many permanent and semi-permanent ice rinks throughout the Vail Valley.
Courtesy photo

Ice skating is another way to get moving while enjoying the outdoors. There are a few ice skating rinks right at the resorts like the Solaris Ice Rink in Vail Village and the Alderhof Ice Rink at Arrabelle at Vail Square in Lionshead that are open daily with skate rentals available. Beaver Creek has a rink right in the village, too, so if the kids aren’t tired from skiing or snowboarding, wear them out on the rink. At Beaver Creek there is a $5 admission fee with your own skates, $10 admission and rentals for ages 12 and younger and a $15 admission and rentals for ages 13 and older.

Dobson Ice Arena near Lionshead also hosts public skate sessions. The cost is $5 for ages 4 and younger, $7 for ages 5 through 12 and $8 for ages 13 and older. Skate rentals are $5 per pair. Check out the VailRec.com website to view the latest public skate schedule.

The colder temperatures have allowed Avon to provide ice skating on Nottingham Lake. Skate rentals are available at the Metcalf Cabin at Harry A. Nottingham Park. If you have your own skates, you can hop on the ice for free, but you need to go into the cabin and sign a waiver. Concessions will be available, too. Enjoy s’mores and hot chocolate and warm up by the fire pits before or after you skate.

The ice rink will be open daily from now until February, weather and conditions permitting. The hours are 3-8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 12-8 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. For more information, go to Avon.org.

Free outdoor skating is also available in Edwards. Stop by Mountain Recreation’s fieldhouse in Edwards and skate around. Some gear has been donated, even some hockey gear from the Colorado Avalanche Alumni Association. For more details, go to MountainRec.org.

If you make your way to Eagle, check out the free ice skating at Eagle Town Park which is open from 9 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. daily. Skates are available to “borrow” courtesy of donations. Fire pits and hockey sticks are available, too. For more information, visit EagleOutside.com.

Both the skating rinks in Edwards and in Eagle exist because of some caring, dedicated and die-hard skating fans, many of them parents and lovers of the sport, so if you are around and want to help maintain these rinks, you can always lend a hand to keep the ice in good condition.

Beaver Creek happenings

Helmut Fricker plays the Alpenhorn at Vail Mountain’s Opening Day on Nov. 11, 2022. Fricker is a regular fixture on the music scene at Beaver Creek as well.
Chris Dillmann/Vail Daily archive

The fun doesn’t end once the slopes close at Beaver Creek. There are lots of entertainment options on the plaza in the afternoons. This Friday, listen to the songs, yodels and jokes from Helmut Fricker, who has been a fixture in the Vail Valley for over 50 years. He plays from 1 to 3 p.m. and again on Sunday at the same time. Just listen for the accordion or alpenhorn and you’ll find Helmut and his lovely wife, Charlotte, accompanying him.

This Saturday, look for Ken Carpenter doing complimentary caricatures from 4 to 6 p.m. Carpenter has been doing caricatures in Beaver Creek Village for decades and is now drawing the kids and grandkids of some of the people he drew years ago. It’s fun to see how you look through the eyes of an experienced caricaturist like Carpenter. Many families like to keep their caricatures year after year and see how they’ve changed.

Additionally, on Saturday, you won’t want to miss out on Fossil Posse. Kids (and parents), if you like dinosaurs or are just curious as to what types of creatures roamed Eagle County — yes, Eagle County, millions of years ago, head to the Fountain Stage near the ice rink between 4 and 5:30 p.m. and listen to Billy Doran explain what roamed where and when. Doran’s engaging stories and historical and scientific references are sure to captivate your entire group.

Saturday also means its carnival time in Beaver Creek Village. During Fun Fest, try your hand at classic carnival games and earn some fun prizes. It’s a great way to wind down the day and it can also be used as an incentive to get your kids to ski or ride all day with the promise of going to Fun Fest afterwards.

This weekend, live music returns to the slopes as the Mountain Music Series presents music at Talons Restaurant at the base of the Larkspur Express, (No. 11), Grouse Mountain Express (No. 10) and Birds of Prey Express (No. 9). Little Foot brings a high energy DJ set from 11 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. so plan to ski the Birds of Prey area, take a few mogul runs and earn a beer while listening to tunes. For more information go to BeaverCreek.com.

Vail Yeti Hockey

The Vail Yeti Hockey team returns to home ice at the Dobson Ice Arena in Lionshead this Friday and Saturday.
Vail Yeti/Courtesy photo

The Vail Yeti Hockey are ready to start 2023 out with a hockey game against the Boulder Bison. The Vail Yeti, the valley’s senior-A hockey team, features players who excelled at the sport in college and on semi-pro teams and are continuing the passion in Vail. The Dobson Ice Arena plays host to the home games and locals and guests “fill the barn” each time the team plays.

Games are typically scheduled on Friday and Saturday nights and the Yeti have a stacked schedule in January and they play through March.

  • Jan. 6-7: Boulder Bison
  • Jan. 13-14: Calumet Wolverines
  • Jan. 20-21: New York Fire Department
  • Jan. 28: Breckenridge Vipers (Vail Yeti play in Breckenridge on Jan. 27)

Get your tickets in advance online and save a few bucks. Adult tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Children 12 and younger are free. You can also purchase a season pass for $150 if you plan on becoming a super fan. The Dobson Ice Arena gets rockin’ at the home games with a good, consistent group of locals following the team and team spirit can be shown by buying some Vail Yeti gear. For more information and to get tickets, go to VailYetiHockey.com.

Dine with the Dogs

Original Vail Ski Patrol Avalanche Dog, Henry, was a staple on Vail Mountain. Henry’s Hut was named after him and that is where Dine with the Dogs happens every Sunday. Henry passed away earlier this year at the age of 15.
Vail Daily archive

Sundays have gone to the dogs, at least up on Vail Mountain. On Sunday mornings enjoy a special time with the canines that work for Vail Mountain. The public is invited to Henry’s Hut and Dogtown Deck, which is at the top of Mountain Top Express (No. 4), High Noon Express (No. 5) and Northwoods Express (No. 11) and Patrol Headquarters. Between 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. the Vail Ski Patrol and the avalanche dogs will train and perform rescue drills and stick around to answer any questions you may have. It’s a great way to learn a bit more about what the dogs’ roles are and it’s a fun photo opportunity.

Bring a bite to eat on the deck or inside the yurt or grab something from Buffalo’s restaurant or Rocky’s Roadhouse Grill. Henry’s Hut is named after Vail Ski Patrol’s first avalanche dog. Rocky’s Roadhouse Grill is named after another veteran avalanche dog. The four-legged members of patrol are the unofficial ambassadors of Vail Ski Patrol and helped launch the avalanche dog programs at other resorts. Get to know the newer members of the Vail Ski Patrol weekly at Dine with the Dogs. For more information, go to Vail.com.

World Cup ski racing, ice skating shows, tree lighting and holiday parade, film fest and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 12/2/22

Birds of Prey ski race

While the rest of the world is watching FIFA World Cup Soccer, the World Cup that is happening this weekend in Beaver Creek is the alpine ski racing kind.

The annual Xfinity Birds of Prey Audi FIS Ski World Cup returns to in Beaver Creek with the men’s speed events this weekend. There will be not one, but two Downhill races on Friday and Saturday and a Super G race on Sunday. The fastest racers from around the world look forward to this challenging and intimidating course on the Golden Eagle trail.

A few things to note, the races are early, 10:15 a.m. on Friday and 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, so allow extra time to get to the Red Tail Stadium, which is the finish area venue near the Talons restaurant. Bleachers will be available on a first-come, first-served basis and you can also stand at the finish area and watch the action. A big screen television reveals top to bottom action on the course.

Park at the Elk or Bear lots below and then take the free shuttle bus up to Beaver Creek Village and then hop on the free shuttle bus that will take you to Red Tail Stadium. Once the bus drops you off at the race venue, you will need to climb a number of stairs and walk on snow, so wear appropriate footwear. Allow about an hour to get from your parked car to Red Tail Stadium and go early to avoid lines on the buses, this is a very popular event.

Back this season is slope access to Red Tail Stadium. This means you can use your Epic Pass or day lift ticket to go up Centennial Lift (No. 6) and ski or ride down the intermediate trail, Red Tail run to Red Tail Stadium. Since this terrain is also being used by racers to warm up, the Red Tail run will only be open to spectators on skis or snowboards from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. Once again, keep in mind the races start at 10:15 a.m. on Friday and 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. So, if you really want to see the first few racers out of the start gate or get a good seat in the bleachers, you may want to take the bus to the venue instead.

The Birds of Prey lift (No. 9) will also be available to the public from 10 a.m to 1 p.m. to get out of the race finish area or Dally catwalk will be open to get skiers and snowboarders back to the base village.

In addition to the races, there are tons of other events going on each day, such as live music, DJs, free Bloody Mary’s early on Saturday, watch parties in the village, prize giveaways, champagne toasts with Korbel Champagne and autograph signings.

Don’t miss the Beers of Prey on Saturday from 2 to 5 p.m. Taste seasonal beers and classic styles outdoors on the plaza at Beaver Creek. While most of the Birds of Prey activities are free, this is a ticketed event, go to BCWorldCup.com to purchase or buy them at the venue. Enjoy this huge après ski party and hopefully you will be saying “Cheers” to an American racer being on the podium.

Get the full schedule at BCWorldCup.com and head out to this amazing show of talent.   

Revely Vail

Ice skating shows will be held at Arrabelle Ice Rink this Saturday at 5 and 6 p.m.
Vail Skating Show/Courtesy photo

Revely Vail continues this weekend with festive activities to round out your day and night. Revely Vail celebrates the brilliance of winter and aims to get everyone excited about the season ahead. After the slopes close on Friday, head to Lionshead for some Silent Disco under the stars. Grab a pair of headphones, listen to the beat and seek out others who also are on that channel.

Headphones are complimentary and this event runs between 4 and 7 p.m. If you can’t make it this weekend, there are several more throughout the month in Lionshead and at Solaris in Vail Village.

Also part of Revely Vail are the ice skating shows. These are short but action-packed demonstrations of strength and grace on the ice. The talented skaters are from international, world and Team USA groups and bring their best to the rink each week. This week’s ice skating shows will be at the Arrabelle Ice Rink, the first show is at 5 p.m. and the second show is at 6 p.m. The shows are free and last about 20 minutes, so it is the perfect thing to do on the way home from après ski or on your way to dinner.

For a full schedule of Revely Vail events, go to DiscoverVail.com. Revely Vail goes until Dec. 17 and then Vail Holidays takes over from Dec. 17 through Jan. 1.

Holiday tree lightings and parade

Get into the holiday spirit with a traditional tree lighting in Minturn on Friday and Christmas on Broadway on Saturday.
John Cutting for Unsplash

Beaver Creek and Lionshead hosted holiday tree lightings last weekend and this Friday marks the time to flip the switch and light the holiday tree in Minturn and roll the parade vehicles through Eagle.

The town of Minturn’s annual tree lighting will take place on Friday from 6 to 7 p.m. To get you into the holiday mood, the town of Minturn has enlisted the help of Mountain Harmony to do some caroling and hot cocoa will be served to keep your hands warm. For the kids, there will be Christmas-themed holiday trivia and a reading of “’Twas the Night Before Christmas.”

The Minturn Community Fund will be once again organizing The Giving Tree at the event. To participate, you pick from a number of ornaments hanging on the lighted tree. Each ornament will include a holiday wish list. By helping out you will be enriching the holiday season for many of your neighbors. You may be able to help out a Minturn kid, the needs of a senior citizen in Minturn or help purchase a holiday dinner for Minturn’s veterans. More details will be available at the tree lighting. ‘Tis the season to give back.

New this year is the holiday shopping hour that will follow the tree lighting at Antique Accents, Minturn Mercantile, The Scarab and Wild Mountain Cellars. Collect a token at the tree lighting and take it to participating retailers for a special offer. Some things to look forward to if you are sticking around to shop, Minturn Mercantile is offering 20% off the entire store and will be serving hot cider. Wild Mountain Cellars will be open and will offer wine specials on bottles and wine by the glass.

Christmas on Broadway will take place on Saturday between 5 and 8 p.m. right there on Broadway Street in downtown Eagle. The street will literally be shut down to allow for the parade and all the festivities to happen outdoors in one location.

Come early and experience the Peppermint Station with cotton candy from Sweet Mustache and sweets from Mini Donuts, hot chocolate from area businesses and Lucky Mary’s food trucks. Then settle in and get a good spot to watch the parade. The parade begins at 5:30 p.m. This has become quite the tradition in Eagle, and this season marks its 32nd Christmas on Broadway Parade. See your friends and neighbors, area businesses and nonprofit groups cruise down Broadway with their holiday-themed floats.

Afterward, stick around and get your holiday shopping done at area stores, grab some dinner and visit with Santa Claus, who will be available for photos between 6 and 8 p.m. and will be located next to Wishes toy Store.

Vail Film Festival

The Vail Film Festival is virtual again this year.
Unsplash/Courtesy photo

For 19 years, the Vail Film Festival has wowed audiences with amazing stories that inspire and entertain. The event is virtual again this year and is being offered in December for the first time, so cozy up with the daylight hours shorter this time of year and check out some of the amazing films between now and 11:45 p.m. on Dec. 4.

Since 2016, the Vail Film Festival has spotlighted female filmmakers and continues to do so this year. Selecting the films is quite a process. The film program is a hybrid of films selected through a submission process and films that the Vail Film Festival selects and curates from film festivals. This year’s film program includes:

  • Tribeca Film Festival Audience Award winner, “Our Father, The Devil”
  • Slamdance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize winner, “Hannah Haha”
  • Santa Barbara International Film Festival Best Film nominee, “We Burn Like This”
  • Lisa Hurwitz’s acclaimed documentary, “The Automat,” with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Mel Brooks and Colin Powell
  • Tribeca Film Festival Best Documentary winner, “The Cave Of Adullam”

Read more about the various films and fit them into your at-home watching schedule. Passes and the full film program of narrative features, documentaries and short films can be found online at VailFilmFestival.Eventive.org. An All-Access Pass is available for $35, or you can purchase an individual film ticket for $10 for any film or short block.

Vail Yeti Hockey

The Vail Yeti Hockey kicks off its 2022-2023 season this weekend.
Madison Rahhal/Courtesy photo

The Vail Yeti Hockey season begins this weekend with two nights of action against the Jackson Hole Moose. Head to the Dobson Ice Arena and get ready for the puck to drop at 7:45 p.m. on both nights.

The team features athletes who played in college and in other talented leagues and is classified as a Senior-A hockey team. The Vail Yeti play other mountain town teams like the Breckenridge Vipers and Front Range team, the Boulder Bison. They also play teams throughout the nation like the Phoenix Desert Dogs and New York Fire Department.

The atmosphere in Dobson Ice Arean rivals that of an NHL Hockey game, just on a smaller scale. Drinks and concessions are available for purchase and Vail Yeti merchandise is on sale as well in case you want to show your support by wearing a Vail Yeti beanie, sweatshirt or jersey.

Tickets are $10 online in advance and $15 at the door, so plan ahead to save a few bucks. On Saturdays throughout the season, the Vail Yeti will host Family Night and Nonprofit Night, teaming with different local nonprofits and allowing those ages 12 and younger to get in for free. So take advantage of that. For more information, go to VailYetiHockey.com.

More terrain on Vail Mountain, Restaurant Week, pet photos with Santa, author meet-and-greets and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 11/18/22

Watch Tricia’s Weekend Picks to find out what is going on this weekend.

Vail Beaver Creek Restaurant Week

No fasting or dieting prior to Thanksgiving this year, there are too many good deals out there you won’t want to miss during Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant week. This meal deal, foodie-friendly promotion was typically held in the fall and organizers are trying it during the early part of the ski season instead this year. The event has not only changed dates, but it is also longer than a week. It started on Vail’s Opening Day, Nov. 11 and goes until Nov. 23, the day before Thanksgiving.

To see a list of the deals, go to DiningAtAltitude.com. It gets sort of overwhelming to keep track of all the deals, so maybe choose by category, for example, find a place to go for breakfast, like Leonora in The Sebastian in Vail Village and order any item off the breakfast menu and a Bloody Mary for $20.22. Lunch could be at Big Bear Bistro where you can order two sandwiches and chips and a drink for $20.22. Los Amigos has select tacos for $2.22 or step into Sweet Basil for their deal, which is during lunch only and is for two people. Take your pick of one appetizer, two entrees and one dessert all for $60, in honor of Vail’s 60th anniversary.

Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week offers up dining specials through Nov. 23. Gessner at the Grand Hyatt Vail is doing a two-course meal for $20.22.
Tricia Swenson/Vail Daily

Dinner offerings range from burgers and beers for $20.22, to sushi and oyster deals, two-course meals and wine pairings. In addition to the $20.22 pricing, restaurants may have other deals so inquire about it with your server when you are seated. For more information and a full list of participating restaurants, go do DiningAtAltitude.com. Reservations are a good idea since many schools are out for the Thanksgiving holiday week and its best to the let the restaurant prepare for the dinners coming in each night.

Vail Mountain adds terrain

Skiers and riders make turns on Vail’s Opening Day on Nov. 11. The resort has already added more terrain and lift access during its first week of the 2022-2023 season.
Chris Dillmann/Vail Daily

With the help of Mother Nature and sophisticated snow-making equipment, Vail Mountain has been able to open up more terrain and lifts during its first week of operations for the 2022-2023 season. Vail Mountain opened on Nov. 11 with about 100 acres and now has more lifts and more runs as the holiday visitors come to Vail for the Thanksgiving break.

A winter snowstorm that dropped nine inches of snow in the high country last Monday night into Tuesday offered those with flexible schedules an early-season powder day. Vail’s Mountain Operations department is working hard to get more terrain open as conditions allow.

Please remember to follow signs and stay out of closed areas otherwise you’re in jeopardy of getting your pass pulled. Also, ski and ride on terrain that is appropriate for your ability level. The only true beginner area is at the top of Eagle’s Nest, serviced by the Little Eagle Lift (No. 15). Even though runs like Swingsville may be marked with a green circle on the map, signifying that it is a beginner run, true beginners should work on their skills around the top of Eagle’s Nest before attempting something more advanced.

On-mountain dining options include Express Lift Cafe at the base of Gondola One (No. 1) Mid Vail, Buffalo’s at the top of Mountain Top Express (No. 4) and Marketplace at Eagle’s Nest at the top of the Eagle Bahn Gondola (No. 19).

If you don’t have your Epic Pass yet, do keep in mind that pass prices do go up on Nov. 20. Go to EpicPass.com to see which pass is right for how you plan to visit Vail Mountain and other resorts on the Epic Pass.

Authors in Autumn

Author Laura Thompson will be just one of many local authors featured at the Authors in Autumn event at the Eagle Public Library on Saturday.
Eagle Valley Library District/Courtesy photo

Looking for some good reads for yourself or a gift for a book lover on your holiday shopping list? Shop local and meet local authors at the Eagle Public Library’s Authors in Autumn event. This free expo will be held at the Eagle Public Library at 600 Broadway Street in downtown Eagle from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday. You may not realize that the valley is home to several authors who write everything from fiction to historical accounts of our valley. The local author lineup includes:

  • Jennifer Alsever – several young adult novels, most recent is “Burying Eva Flores”
  • John Dunn – “Learning to be a Lawyer in Leadville, Colorado”
  • Kathy Heicher – several books on Eagle County history, newest is “Gypsum Days: Pioneers, the Poor Farm & Progress”
  • Helen Hiebert – several paper crafting books, newest is “The Art of Paper Craft”
  • Judi Kirby – “The Book of Lena: A Time Before” and “Eartha’s Name”
  • Dan Matney – “Final Wishes”
  • Laura Thompson – “Beaver Creek, a pictorial history from 1883-2015”

Refreshments will be provided during this open house-style event, so make a plan to stop by the Eagle Library this weekend and meet the faces and minds behind the book covers. For more information, go to EVLD.org and go to the events page.

Santa Paws

Bring your pet and camera to Castle Peak Veterinary Services and take your picture with Santa.
Castle Peak Veterinary Service/Courtesy photo

The holidays are just around the corner and if you want to get your holiday greeting cards mailed out sooner than later, bring your pet to Santa Paws on Saturday. Castle Peak Veterinary Service in Eagle is hosting Santa Paws on Saturday from noon to 3 p.m. Dress your dog, cat or other well-behaved pet up in holiday sparkle and cheer and get a photo with the man in red.

No appointment is necessary and although it is a free event for the community, donations are welcome and all proceeds go to Eagle County Animal Shelter. The Eagle County Animal Shelter and Animal Services does good things in our community. They provide care and shelter to stray animals in need while maintaining a safe community where they promote responsible pet ownership through outreach, education and enforcement. Animal Services Officers respond to calls of animals at large, aggressive animals or animal bites, excessive barking, or other animal control issues.

Bring your own camera, they’ll provide Santa. Castle Peak Veterinary Services is happy to bring back this tradition after a few seasons off due to COVID-19. Castle Peak Veterinary Services is located at 734 Chambers Ave. in Eagle. For more information, dial 970-328-5444.

Cocktails and Clay

Cocktails and Clay will be the featured art class this Saturday at Alpine Arts Center.
Alpine Arts Center/Courtesy photo

Looking for gift ideas for that certain someone who is hard to shop for? Create a wonderful and hand-crafted present from Alpine Arts Center’s Cocktails and Clay this Saturday in Edwards. This week’s art project is clay aspen vases, which you can personalize, adding that extra touch if this does become a gift for someone. Or, if you end up keeping it, each time you use the vase, you’ll remember the fun that went into making it.

Alpine Arts Center draws out the artistic abilities in everyone and no prior experience is needed. The instructor will walk you through the process and all the materials and supplies will be provided. The class is $49 per person and advanced registration is required.

The class is from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., so make a night of it. Wine and beer are just $6 per glass. All alcoholic beverages must be purchased through the Alpine Arts Center’s bar and there are some non-alcoholic options and snacks available, too. Advanced registration is required. Go to AlpineArtsCenter.org to get signed up. Cocktails and Clay alternates with Cocktails and Canvas and they also offer Wax and Wine, Painting and Pints and more.

Vail’s Opening Day, Veterans Day, Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week, Nordic ski gear swap and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 11/11/22

Vail Mountain opens

Get ready to enjoy the first day of skiing and snowboarding in Eagle County on Friday as Vail Mountain opens for the 2022-2023 season. The first day of the season is always exciting with plenty of costume-clad enthusiasts on the snow. There will also be people camped out at the base to claim first chair bragging rights and it’s a reason to go to work a little bit later just to make a few turns.

On Wednesday, Vail Resorts sent out a press release stating that Vail Mountain would open with at least 75 acres of terrain. Vail Mountain plans to open Gondola One (No. 1) out of Vail Village and the Eagle Bahn Gondola (No. 19) in Lionshead. The gondolas and lifts will operate from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily. Mountain Top Express (No. 4) will give skiers and riders access to Swingsville and Ramshorn runs in the Mid Vail area. The Little Eagle Lift (No. 15) will access beginner terrain at Eagle’s Nest. All skiers and snowboarders must download at the end of the day, there is no top-to-bottom skiing or riding at this time.

If you get hungry, on-mountain dining will be available at the following locations:

  • Express Lift Après Bar in Vail Village Mountain Plaza 
  • Mid Vail at the top of Gondola One (No. 1)
  • Buffalo’s at the top of Mountaintop Express (No. 4)   
  • Eagle’s Nest Market Place at the top of the Eagle Bahn Gondola (No. 19)

This year, Vail Mountain celebrates its 60th anniversary and will kick off the season with a ceremony celebrating key partners in sustainability, diversity, equity and inclusion, youth access and adaptive sports. Come early for the Opening Day ceremony starting at 8:15 a.m. with representatives from Vail’s key sustainability and environmental partner, The United States Forest Service, as well as the National Brotherhood of Skiers, SOS Outreach, Small Champions and Vail Veterans.

Vail Mountain opens for the season on Nov. 11.
Vail Resorts/Courtesy photo

In 1962, Vail Mountain opened on Dec. 15. It was the realization of a dream of Pete Seibert, a 10th Mountain Division veteran who came back after WW II to find a place to start a ski resort. With the help of Earl Eaton, he found that place, and they had grand visions for building a ski area here. With its ties to the Army’s winter warfare unit, the 10th Mountain Division, it’s fitting that Vail’s Opening Day falls on Veterans Day. Stop by the Express Lift Après Café at the base of Gondola One (No. 1) for free tastings of 10th Mountain Whiskey & Spirits Company products and toast the season ahead and those who served our country.

There are many things to celebrate this season, including two new chairlifts set to open later this season, a new six-passenger lift, Game Creek Express (No. 7) in Game Creek Bowl that replaced the four-person lift and a brand new lift in Sun Down Bowl, called the Sun Down Express (No. 17). There will also be ice bars on the slopes and snow bungalows, giving you a place to retreat to during the ski day at the top of Eagle’s Nest.

So, get the boards ready, take inventory and make sure you have all your gear and get out there and enjoy Vail Mountain’s Opening Day this Friday. For more information, go to Vail.com and if you still need your Epic Pass, visit EpicPass.com. Prices go up on Nov. 20.

Veterans Day

A crowd gathers at Flag Pole Plaza at Freedom Park in Edwards to honor veterans. There will be a ceremony at 4 p.m. on Friday for Veterans Day.
Vail Daily Archives

This Friday is also Veterans Day, which is recognized on Nov. 11 each year. To jog your memory from high school history class, Veterans Day was originally called Armistice Day, marking the end of World War I when at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the fighting ended with the signing of an armistice.

This holiday is often confused with Memorial Day, held on the last Monday of May each year. According to Military.com, Memorial Day honors military personnel who died in service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle. Veterans Day honors everyone who has served in the military, whether or not they served in wartime or died in battle.

To honor veterans locally, head to the Flag Pole Plaza in Freedom Park in Edwards, next to Battle Mountain High School and Colorado Mountain College.

The 17th annual Eagle County Veterans Day ceremony honoring veterans of the United States Armed Forces and those currently serving on active duty is presented by the Freedom Park Memorial Committee, VFW Post 10721 and Eagle County. The keynote speaker will be U.S. Army Captain Peter Thompson, a Vietnam veteran. The National Anthem will be sung by Michelle Cohn Levy, the cantor at B’nai Vail. The event starts at 4 p.m.

Thanks to the talented students at Eagle Valley High School, you can learn more about our local veterans by watching the videos they have put together. Dr. Joy Hamilton and her award-winning media team at Eagle Valley High School have been interviewing veterans so teachers can bring vets from the local VFW Post into the classroom virtually. These videos will all be sent to the Library of Congress to be saved for posterity. They are also now available to the public, so check out your friends and neighbors and learn about their time while they served our country. The videos from this year and past years can be found on YouTube.

Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week

From date nights to family dining, take advantage of the savings during Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week, which runs from Nov. 11 to 23.
Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week

Hit the slopes and then grab lunch, après ski or dinner at a discount at restaurants that are participating in Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week. The annual event, which began in 2013, usually happens in the fall but this year it coincides with the early part of the season. And although it says it lasts a week, this year it is extending beyond one week and is actually going on from Nov. 11 to Nov. 23, so you have plenty of time to check out the deals at your favorite restaurant or try someplace new.

The pricing usually follows a theme of the current year, so this year prices will be $20.22 for dinner deals, or even $2.22 for a fresh drip coffee and cookie at Vail Mountain Coffee & Tea Company in Beaver Creek or $2.22 for a draft beer or house wine at Blue Moose Pizza between 3 and 5 p.m. at the Lionshead and Beaver Creek locations. Some restaurants are paying homage to Vail’s 60th anniversary and doing deals for $60. For example, Sweet Basil is doing a $60 lunch special for two people that includes one appetizer, two entrees and one dessert. Here are a few other deals that may grab your attention.

  • Moe’s Original BBQ – Double Wide Family Pack (Pork): One pound pulled pork, two sides, corn bread or buns
  • Stoke & Rye – Small plate and glass of wine for $20.22. Your choice of select fine wines and for the small plates you can choose from bacon-wrapped scallops, beef tartar, mushroom ravioli or smoked oysters.
  • Gessner at Grand Hyatt Vail – Choice of first and main course or main course and desserts. First course choices include onion soup or roasted vegetable salad and main course choices are chicken fried chicken or Colorado trout. For the dessert lovers, they will serve a limoncello ice cream flute or white chocolate croissant bread pudding.

Taco deals, sushi deals, burger deals, steak deals…is anyone hungry yet? Don’t buy groceries for the next 13 days because breakfast, lunch and dinner await you at Vail-Beaver Creek Restaurant Week. Find a full list of participating restaurants and offerings at DiningAtAltitude.com.

Vail Nordic Swap

The Vail Nordic Swap takes place this Saturday and benefits the Ski & Snowboard Club Vail Nordic Ski Team.
Ski & Snowboard Club Vail/Courtesy photo

If you’re looking to get into some Nordic sports this winter, take advantage of the savings you’ll find at the annual Vail Nordic Swap on Saturday at the Vail Nordic Center from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. The event is a benefit for the Ski & Snowboard Club Vail Nordic Team, with 10% of the sales commissions going to the team.

There will be a selection of skate skis, touring and classic skis, telemark skis, alpine touring skis, snowshoes and related gear and clothing in good condition. There will also be deals on new gear.

If you have gear you’d like to sell, you can drop it off at the swap on Friday from 3 to 6 p.m. and on Saturday from 8 to 9:30 a.m. before the swap at the Vail Nordic Center starts at 10 a.m. Unsold gear pick up is from 3 until 4:30 p.m. only on Saturday at the Vail Nordic Center. No alpine or snowboard gear allowed.

Admission is $5 per person and free after 12 noon. Children under 12 years of age are free. For more information, go to SkiClubVail.org.  

Eagle Art Walk

Emmy Stained Glass will be one of the artists exhibiting at ARTwalk on November 11.
EagleARTS/Courtesy photo

Get ahead of the holiday shopping rush and support local artisans and businesses at the same time by heading to the EagleARTS monthly Second Friday ARTwalk this Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. Stroll along Broadway visiting local shops, galleries and restaurants. Local artists will be exhibiting handmade works of art inside participating businesses, including ARTSPaCE workshop+gallery, Antlers & Rosé, Everyday Outfitters, Food Smith/Mountain Flour, Nurture Skin & Body, Mountain Lifestyle Properties, QuietKat, ROAM restaurant and Yoga Off Broadway.

EagleARTS has really turned the ARTwalk into the place to be on Friday nights. In addition to the artists and businesses, they will have food trucks, live entertainment from Joe Hanley and Jen Mack, plus a performance by the Battle Mountain High School Drumline making for a festive night out.

EagleARTS wants to show off some of its community art projects, so be sure to check out the community mural at 2nd Street and Broadway and take a seat on EagleARTS’ latest public art project which are two benches painted by local artists located at 120 Broadway and 225 Broadway.

The Vail Valley Art Guild is a part of the evening as well. This month’s exhibit is called Small Gems and features the artwork of Elaine Kuntz. Stop by their gallery at 108 West 2nd Street in Eagle.

For more information, visit the EagleART’s website at EagleArts.org or search for the EagleARTS Holiday 2nd Friday ARTwalks event on Facebook.

Skiing and riding options in Colorado, a holiday craft fair, casino night, homemade chili and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 11/4/22

Slopes open in Colorado

Although there isn’t skiing in Eagle County yet (Vail opens on Nov. 11 and Beaver Creek on Nov. 23) there are a few ski areas open if you want to get out and make some turns. The yearly race to see who opens trails first was won by Arapahoe Basin, which opened on Oct. 23, followed by Keystone on Oct. 28 and Loveland on Nov. 3. In a surprise move, Winter Park squeezed in an opening date in the month of October, spinning its lifts on Oct. 31, welcoming back costume-clad skiers and snowboarders to the slopes.

Mother nature has helped by blanketing the resorts with some natural snow in October and with snow earlier this week. The resorts will open more terrain as conditions allow and it’s best to check each ski area’s social media channels to learn the latest. Keystone Ski Resort announced earlier this week that it will open Dercum’s Dash and River Run so intermediate skiers and riders will now be able to ski directly to River Run Village instead of downloading the River Run Gondola.

If you can get out of work or school early, take advantage of Arapahoe Basin’s Friday Afternoon Club. On Fridays through Nov. 18 you can get $39 lift tickets to ski between 2 and 4 p.m. After skiing or riding, enjoy beer and appetizer specials in the 6th Alley Bar & Grill.

A few tips to remember during early season:

  • Be prepared for longer lift lines over the weekend when the demands are higher because there isn’t a ton of terrain open.
  • Follow signs for closed areas and be aware that early season conditions exist. Each resort has limited terrain open and seek out information on each ski area’s website for terrain status as it may change due to snow totals and conditions.
  • Beginner terrain may be limited at this time, too, so know your ability level and decide if the terrain open is appropriate for your skill level.
  • Listen to your body. If you feel tired, take a break or call it a day and download if that’s easier. Save your season.

Family Food Fest

Enjoy some homemade chili, a petting zoo and learn about sourcing your food locally at the Family Food Fest on Saturday.
Stephanie Monfrette for Unsplash

A new event is coming to the Eagle River Center, promoting locally and regionally sourced food and celebrating fall, the Family Food Fest will be the place to be on Saturday from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.

The event is being hosted by New Roots and their mission is to support local, sustainable food systems. Saturday’s event gives New Roots an opportunity to do that by providing fun, informative and effective opportunities for everyone across Eagle County to learn about and contribute to their food system. Come enjoy some locally produced and prepared beef chili along with options with plenty of vegetables and drinks will be available.

Bring the kids so they can enjoy the petting zoo and help New Roots by bidding on silent auction items. New Roots is doing a lot of work behind the scenes, especially at the community gardens. They took over the management of the community garden at the Colorado Mountain College Edwards campus last year and have since installed a new irrigation system and a native plant garden. They have also provided free gardening classes for Colorado Mountain College students and community members.

New Roots has also contributed over 6,000 pounds of fresh, local produce to The Community Market over the past three years.

Help New Roots and their partners, All the Good Stuff and Rustic Farm to Fork celebrate fall and learn how you can get involved. The Eagle River Center is located at the Eagle County Fairgrounds in Eagle. For tickets and more information, go to NewRootsCO.org.

Rejuvenate Fall Retreat

Revitalize your body with the Vitality Collective and Spa Anjali’s retreat this weekend in Avon.
Marc Piscotty/Courtesy photo

The Vitality Collective & Spa Anjali at the Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa in Avon are hosting a three-day retreat for those who want to feel revived and rejuvenated before we ramp for the ski and snowboard season, the holidays and the new year. The goal of this retreat, happening Friday through Sunday, is to help quiet the mind, with a focus on regulating the nervous system, hydrating the connective tissue and building new relationships.

Head to the Westin Riverfront on Friday for a Welcome Workshop and then get ready to dive deep on Saturday into the program The Vitality Collective and Spa Anjali have developed programs to help you slow down, go inward and rejuvenate after the fast-paced summer season.

Saturday and Sunday’s sessions will include nutritious meals at the Riverfront Market along with classes and activities like Daioyin flow, restorative yoga and sound bath meditation, meditative breathwork and MELT Method workshop, which is a breakthrough self-treatment system that restores the supportiveness of the body’s connective tissue to eliminate chronic pain, improve performance and decrease accumulated stress caused by repetitive postures and movements of everyday living. Think about how you sit at your desk, or how you hold and stare at your phone … yep, your body needs the MELT method.

The Rejuvenate Fall Retreat will be led by Sofia Lindroth and Hannah Knauer of The Vitality Collective in Eagle. Lindroth is a hands-on myofascial release therapist and a MELT method instructor. Knauer is a breathwork facilitator and yoga teacher. Together, they will help you learn more about your body and your mind, allowing you to identify what causes you distress and how to address it.

The retreat includes two nights at the Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa in Avon, or if you don’t need lodging, you can just pay for the retreat and not the accommodations. For more information, go to SpaAnjali.com/Retreats or call 970-790-2051. The deadline to register for the retreat is at noon on Friday.

Holiday Artisan and Craft Fair

Get ahead of the holiday shopping madness by going to the Artisan and Craft Fair at Gypsum Creek Middle School this Saturday.
Gypsum Creek Middle School/Courtesy photo

Now that Halloween has come and gone, time to start thinking about holiday gifts. No joke, Santa will be on hand at the Gypsum Creek Middle School PTO Holiday Artisan and Craft Fair this Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., so it’s never too early to get your holiday shopping started.

In addition to Santa being available for photo opportunities, nearly 50 local artisans and vendors will be on hand to sell wares and concessions while you do your holiday shopping. There will be kids activities in the Kids Korner, including games, coloring, origami and a movie. There is also babysitting at Kids Korner if you want to really get after it and shop kid-free for a bit.

The Gypsum Creek middle schoolers have been learning about entrepreneurship in their exploratory learning classes, so the students will have tables, too. Stop by and see some of their creations and ask them about their entrepreneurial spirit. You never know what ideas these sixth, seventh and eighth graders will come up with.

Proceeds from this holiday fair will go towards a field trip to an escape room and to cover academic competition travel costs. To learn more, go to the 2022 GCMS PTO Holiday Artisan and Craft Fair events page on Facebook.

Casino Night

Play some games and raise funds for Red Sandstone Elementary School’s Casino night on Saturday.
Michal Parzuchowski for Unsplash

Another school fundraiser is adults only. Casino Night is being hosted by Red Sandstone Elementary School, Vail’s only public school, on Saturday night from 5:30 to 10 p.m.

Help support the Red Sandstone Elementary School Tigers build a new basketball court and possibly a greenhouse for the school by having a little fun at the casino tables that will be set up at Donovan Pavilion. All sorts of casino games will be offered along with a mystery game. Even if you don’t have kids, help support the community and have a night of fun without traveling to Las Vegas.

In addition to the casino setting, there will be live music by Minturn’s Turntable Review and the meal will be catered by Mr. G’s Cuisine. Drinks will be flowing, including a Snake Eyes specialty drink.

The Red Sandstone School’s PTO has teamed up with a lot of great sponsors and donors, so look for a variety of items in the silent auction. There will also be a paddle raise to help them reach their fundraising goal. Specialty Tiger t-shirts will be available for purchase, also.

The Grand Hyatt Vail is offering discounted rooms if you want to stay close to the party venue. Childcare options are also available through the Vail Recreation District. For more information and tickets, go to RSES.Ejoinme.org/Tickets.

From Trick-or-Treat Trots to costume contests, pumpkin patches and puppet shows, it’s a busy Halloween weekend: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 10/28/22

Find our more about this weekend’s happenings by watching Tricia’s Halloween Weekend Picks

This year, Halloween falls on a Monday but there are plenty of things going on for the kids and adults leading up to the spooky holiday. We’ve listed them out by day so you can plan to do as much or as little as you like around the Vail Valley this Halloween season.

Friday

Pumpkin Carving at Alpine Arts Center: Bring a pumpkin and leave with your hand-carved or painted jack-o-lantern. For $15, Alpine Arts Center provides the instructors, tools and templates, and they will also have some treats. Two time slots are available at either 4 or 6 p.m. and parents, there will be “witching hour” specials with beer, wine and champagne for $4. Sign up at AlpineArtsCenter.org.

A Kiddie Halloween Party will be held at North Coast Originals on Broadway in downtown Eagle on Friday from 4 to 7:30 p.m. Here, your kids can get crafty by making paper jack-o-lanterns and they can even eat their creations by dipping caramel apples and decorating cookies. For more information, visit Bit.ly/KiddieHalloween.

Glow Flow Yoga at the Athletic Club at The Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa welcomes you to do yoga practice with a Halloween twist. Participants are encouraged to wear a costume and glow bracelets and necklaces will be handed out before DJ Kirby spins the tunes during class. A $20 donation is recommended and will benefit the Vail Breast Cancer Awareness Group. Go to AthleticClubWestin.com for more details.

From hot dogs to yetis, the creativity in costumes is endless in the Vail Valley around Halloween.
Vail Recreation District/Courtesy photo

Halloween Parents Night Out gives parents a break while their kids head to the Vail Gymnastics Center on Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. for a costume contest, tricks for treats, open gym time, games, pizza, drinks and a Halloween movie. This is for kids ages 5 to 12 and the cost is $35 if preregistered or $40 for drop-ins. Register in advance at VailRec.com/Register.

Alter Ego Costume Ball is a fundraiser for the Eagle Valley Child Care Association to keep early childhood tuition affordable. Discover your alter ego and head to the Brush Creek Pavilion in Eagle from 6:30 p.m. to midnight. There will be dinner and dessert by Lauren’s Kitchen and live music by Grey Rails plus a silent auction. Tickets start at $35 and you can purchase them at GiveButter.com/c/AlterEgo.

7 Hermits is having a Hermits Halloween Bash on Friday night. Live music with Uncle Charlie’s Band (featuring members of The Runaway Grooms) will start at 8 p.m. Costumes are strongly encouraged and there will be a costume contest, Jell-o shots and more. Note: 7 Hermits in Eagle will be closing its doors after its Halloween party to make way for a new restaurant coming this winter, so say “goodbye” on Friday.

10th Mountain Whiskey & Spirit Company is hosting its Halloween Costume Party on Friday from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Vail Tasting Room on Bridge Street, Vail Village. Enjoy drink specials and awards for best costumes.

Saturday

Burn some of the Halloween candy calories by taking part in a 2K Fun Run on Saturday from 9 to 11 a.m. at Nottingham Park. Wear your Halloween costume but make sure you can maneuver the path around Nottingham Lake. There will be a costume contest with prizes awarded after the race and registration includes entry to the run, one pumpkin and one carving kit (while they last). Ziploc bags will even be provided so can keep pumpkin seeds and make a tasty treat at home. Visit Avon.org for more info.

Walking Mountains Science Center hosts its Science Spooktacular: Super Spy Science Fun from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Avon. Kids will learn the science of solving mysteries through hands-on activity stations and interactive experiments. Go ahead and wear the costumes and get ready to learn and have fun. Visit WalkingMountains.org for more info.

Music Makers Hacienda Musica Fright at the Museum brings in Bravo! Vail musicians to Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon starting at 9 a.m. for a spooky concert followed by a forest walk and instrument petting zoo. More information can be found at BravoVail.org.

Mountain Youth’s Annual Pumpkinfest, presented by Village Market Edwards, will be taking place on Saturday at Riverwalk in Edwards. Start out at The Bookworm of Edwards with Spooky Storytime at 10 a.m., then head over to the Backyard in Riverwalk from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for face painting, yard games, bounce house, hot cocoa and more. Grab a pumpkin at the Mountain Youth table for $5. Riverwalk will also host Trick-or-Treat Street for even more candy gathering opportunities at area businesses. More info at MountainYouth.org.

For those who dare…there is a Polar Plunge that will take place in Avon. Wear your Halloween costume and take a dip in Nottingham Lake. Registration starts at 11 a.m. and the Polar Plunge goes from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. This challenge is a fundraiser for Special Olympics Colorado and there’s a $75 fundraising minimum for all adults and $50 fundraising minimum for students and Special Olympics Colorado athletes. Please visit SpecialOlympicsCo.org/Event/AvonPlunge/ for more information.

Fall Fun Fest at 4 Eagle Ranch offers Halloween fun for the whole family hosted by Mountain Life Calvary Chapel from 1 to 4 p.m. Wear your costumes and head to the ranch for games, bouncy houses and lots of candy. This is a family-friendly event, so no scary costumes.

Trunk-or-Treat at Eagle Vineyard Church will offer not only candy but tricycle races, games and fun for all ages. Check it out from 2 to 5 p.m. at Eagle Vineyard Church.

Trunk-Or-Treat with Episcopal Church from 4 to 5 p.m. Let your kids roam between creatively decorated vehicles in the parking lot of the Edwards Interfaith Chapel on Highway 6.

A Celebration of Spirit event will be held with medium Becky Hesseltine. This time of year is a great way to celebrate our spirit-loved ones who have departed from this physical life. Join Becky at Helen’s House in Minturn on Main Street on Saturday from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tickets are $45 per person. Learn more at BeckyHesseltine.com/Events/2022/CelebrationOfSpirit.

Halloween at Grand Avenue Grill will feature the music of Jen Mack from 6 to 9 p.m. in Eagle. Come enjoy dinner, drinks, a good crowd Mack’s music will include originals and covers that span the decades and have been influenced by Billie Holiday, Bonnie Raitt and Anita Baker.

Ein Prosit is hosting a Halloween party with prizes for best costume, drink specials, live music and more in Avon starting at 6 p.m.

Minturn Community Fund will host its annual Halloween Party with Minturn’s own Turntable Review band. The event will be held in downtown Minturn at Magusto’s with drink and food specials. There will be a costume contest and the theme this year is “The Looney Bin,” in case that inspires any costume ideas. $20 donation at the door and the event starts at 9 p.m. Minturn.org/Home/Events/14951.

The Turntable Review will play at the annual Minturn Community Fund’s Halloween Party at Magusto’s in Minturn.
Minturn Community Fund/Courtesy photo

Primal J and the Neanderthals play at Agave in Avon from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m. A $500 cash prize will be handed out for best costume, so, get off the couch for this one.

Sunday

If you missed this event on Saturday, Walking Mountains Science Center hosts its second installment of Science Spooktacular: Super Spy Science Fun from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Avon. Kids will learn the science of solving mysteries through hands-on activity stations and interactive experiments. Go ahead and wear the costumes and get ready to learn and have fun. Visit WalkingMountains.org for more info.

Music Makers Hacienda Musica Fright at the Museum brings in Bravo! Vail musicians to Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon starting at 9 a.m. for a spooky concert followed by a forest walk and instrument petting zoo. More information can be found at BravoVail.org.

It’s not quite a Halloween event, but Touch A Truck was postponed last Sunday and rescheduled for this Sunday. This event gives kids a chance to get up close and hop in and touch these vehicles that are so mesmerizing, all courtesy of the Vail Public Library and Children’s Garden of Learning. This will be held at the Ford Park parking lot and will run from 10:30 a.m. until noon.

Minturn Trick-or-Treating happens on Sunday starting at 5:30 p.m. Stop by Town Hall for trick-or-treating and photo opportunities. Candy is available until 7:30 p.m. or until it runs out. Then, roam the streets of Minturn for more trick-or-treating. For more information, visit Minturn.org/Home/Events/13911.

The staff at Minturn Town Hall will be ready for the trick-or-treaters on Sunday.
Town of Minturn/Courtesy photo

Also in Minturn on Sunday, check out Rockin’ Halloween with Radio Free Minturn. DJ Dash and DJ Dana will host this at the studio at 105 Williams Street on Sunday during the trick-or-treating with candy for the kids and T-shirts to sell to moms and dads. To get into the spirit of things, Radio Free Minturn will be playing “War of the Worlds” from about 5 to 8 p.m.

The Ultimate Halloween Costume Party will be held at Route 6 Cafe in EagleVail on Sunday starting at 7 p.m. with the music of Rewind. This is a fundraiser for the Vail Valley Theatre Company (whose “A Rocky Halloween” musical shows have sold out this week). $20 is the ticket price and includes one drink. Wear your best Halloween or ’80s costume as this event will be full of people in the Halloween spirit. Visit VailTheatre.org for more info.

Rewind will play at the Ultimate Halloween Costume Party at Route 6 Cafe on Sunday.
Rewind Band/Courtesy photo

 Monday

Trick-or-Treat Story Time will be held at the Vail Public Library from 1 to 2 p.m. (right before the Trick-or-Treat Trot from 2 to 5 p.m.) This free offering is perfect for babies and toddlers and will feature non-scary Halloween stories and poems and a special appearance by Alp Arts Puppetry. Go to VailLibrary.com for more info.

The 30th annual Vail Trick-or-Treat Trot is the place to be on Monday afternoon. This free event is for infants up to 10-year-olds and their families and allows them to roam the streets of Vail and Lionshead from 2 to 5 p.m. Participating merchants will have an orange jack-o-lantern leaf bag outside their front door. The Trick-or-Treat Trot takes place rain, snow or shine so please dress for the elements and bring your own reusable bag or containers for collecting candy. For more information, go to VailRec.org.

In the Vail Valley, Halloween isn’t just for the kids, adults like to dress up, too.
Vail Recreation District/Courtesy photo

The Skipper & Scout boutique in Vail Village is ramping things up on Halloween with not only trick-or-treating at the store, but also music with DJ Piro, face painting and a costume contest with an exciting prize. The event goes from 2 to 5 p.m. Instagram.com/skipperScoutVail/.

We don’t want to leave out the older kids, so the Gypsum Public Library is hosting a Teen Night Costume Contest where those 12 and older are invited to show off their costumes, join in some fun and participate in the outcome by voting for their favorite costume of the night. The event goes from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. and more information can be found at EVLD.org.

‘Moms Rock’ climbing classes provide much-needed support for new mothers

Navigating life postpartum is undoubtedly difficult for mothers. That challenge may only be amplified when a new mother does not have ample social support available. 

While experiencing this challenge herself, Eagle Climbing and Fitness employee Courtney Moore sought to provide a resource that had previously been unavailable to herself: A mommy and me climbing class called “Moms Rock.” 

Moore explained how having the opportunity to find community within an established interest can help new mothers feel more like “themselves.” After giving birth, a mother of young children may feel as though they lost their identity and individuality — they do, after all, have a whole other person under their wing now. 

In Moore’s experience with her two young children, she explained that isolation and a sense of loss of self become even more difficult to manage when a parent’s young child starts crawling. The child’s newfound mobility makes it possible for more dangerous situations to arise. Moore said any new parent can attest to the quickness young ones can find themselves in harm’s way. In constantly playing the role of a protector, she explained that having the time to do what they love often goes out the window for a new mom.

Mothers Stacy Duval (left) and Sara Wilson (right) help their young children, Charlotte (left) and Maverick (right) get accustomed to safely climbing at a “Moms Rock” mommy and me climbing class.
Courtney Moore/ Courtesy photo

With her younger child beginning to embark on crawling adventures, Moore said establishing a place where new mothers can find a community with a shared interest outside of all being new mothers was game-changing for herself. Moore explained how the extra support from the other new moms around her is what helped her start climbing again. 

“I kind of started it just so I could find some other moms who have been through it or are going through it,” Moore said. “We can all share in the ‘It takes a village to raise the kids’ idea of just getting some extra pairs of eyes on the little ones so that moms can keep climbing or try climbing for the first time.”

The “Moms Rock” climbing classes, which started on Sept. 17 are not only there for moms to scale rock walls and find peer support, but also for their infants and toddlers to develop important safety skills. 

Many of the safety skills the young children in Moore’s climbing classes learn involve familiarizing themselves with climbing gear should they grow up to share the interest with their mom. However, much of the safety that the infants and toddlers are getting taught can be transferred into other areas of their lives, which in turn can help their parents breathe easier.

“If they’re bouldering on the shorter walls, the biggest thing is that the kids learn to climb back down after they’re done climbing instead of jumping into mom or dad’s arms,” Moore said. “At some point in their toddlerhood or early childhood, they will climb when mom or dad is not within an arms-reach and we don’t want them launching themselves from, you know, our or even 10 feet up.”

Mom Lauryn Weaver spots for her child, Josie, while she gives climbing a try during Eagle Climbing and Fitness’ “Moms Rock” class.
Courtney Moore/ Courtesy photo

After getting the inevitable toddler tears out of the way at the beginning of class, Moore said the little ones and moms both ended up having a great time. The first portion of the class is designated for young children to explore and learn what climbing is all about. Once the kids have worn themselves out, Moore explained that the moms had their chance to enjoy climbing themselves. 

For more information or to purchase tickets for the next mommy and me “Moms Rock” climbing class, visit EagleClimbing.com. 

Walks for causes, Wild West fun, John Denver tribute, last ride on the lifts at Beaver Creek and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 9/23/22

Walks for causes

Rocky Mountain Walk to End Alzheimer’s

Head down to the Brush Creek Park and Pavilion for the Rocky Mountain Walk to End Alzheimer’s this Saturday. Registration opens up at 9 a.m. and get there early for coffee and breakfast goodies as well as entertainment by Helmut and Charlotte Fricker, Don Watson, Mountain Harmony, kids activities and face painting and the Battle Mountain High School Dance Team.

This Saturday’s walk is one of the many walks happening across the nation right now for the Alzheimer’s Association. The Alzheimer’s Association’s mission is to have a world without Alzheimer’s disease and all other dementia. Recent numbers release from the nationwide nonprofit showed that:

  • Over 6 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s
  • Alzheimer’s kills more than prostate cancer and breast cancer combined
  • Over 11 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementia.
  • In 2022, Alzheimer’s and other dementia cost the nation$321 billion. By 2050, these costs could rise to nearly 1 trillion.

There is currently no prevention or cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Charity walks like this one at Brush Creek Park on Saturday hope to change that. The walk will be held on the recreation path throughout Eagle Ranch and is about 2 miles in length, perfect for any age and strollers and dogs are welcome. It’s free to participate and donations can be placed at Act.Alz.org/RMWalk.

The Rocky Mountain Walk to End Alzheimer’s returns to Eagle this Saturday at Brush Creek Park and Pavilion.
Tricia Swesnon/Vail Daily

Curefest for Childhood Cancer

The Vail Valley Curefest for Childhood Cancer is happening in Lionshead on Saturday morning. Curefest is put on by Ski Fast Foundation, which was created by Campbell Sullivan in 2017. Campbell was diagnosed with CIC-DUX4 Sarcoma in 2017, she battled for nearly four years. Her goal was to inspire other kids and provide them with financial assistance. She was an athlete at Ski and Snowboard Club Vail and competed in alpine ski racing.  

The route begins in Lionshead in front of Bart & Yeti’s and takes walkers to the top of Bridge Street in Vail Village where the group will end at Gondola One. For more information, go to SkiFastFoundation.com.

Climb It For Climate

Also in Lionshead on Saturday is Climb It For Climate, a benefit for Walking Mountains Science Center. Here, participants will hike up the Berry Picker Trail (about 4 miles and 2,200 vertical feet) to Eagle’s Nest. Walking Mountain’s goal is to help reduce local emissions 50% by 2030 and by 80% by 2050. To do that, they need your help and they need you to understand and become educated on how you can help, so look for plenty of educational and activity stations at Basecamp (base of Eagle Bahn Gondola) along the Berry Picker Trail and at Eagle’s Nest once you’ve reached the top.

Sprinkled throughout the educational portion of this, there will be plenty of live music on the trail, at the top of the mountain and there’s even an after party at Bol once you return from the top of Lionshead after a day of fun, food, beer and wine, a family scavenger hunt and more.

Tickets are $100 per person for ages 11 and up and $25 per person for ages 4 through 10. For a full schedule of events, take a look at ClimbItForClimate.Earth.

John Denver Tribute

Rick Schuler will perform a tribute concert with the music of John Denver on Saturday.
Rick Schuler/Courtesy photo

It’s hard to believe that it has been 25 years since John Denver passed away in a plane accident on Oct. 12, 1997. Each year, Oct. 6 through 12 is remembered by John Denver fans as the anniversary of the iconic singer’s passing. To commemorate this anniversary, Rick Schuler, an authentic John Denver tribute artist, is touring with the Celebration Tour in honor of this special anniversary and one of his stops in the Vail Valley.

Head out to hear the Rocky Mountain High Experiene at Gracious Savior Church in Edwards at 4 p.m. on Saturday. Here, Schuler will play some of John Denver’s iconic tunes like “Sunshine on My Shoulders,” “Thank God I’m a Country Boy,” “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” “Rocky Mountain High,” and more. Schuler will interact with the crowd and share stories from Denver’s past about how some of these songs came about.

Schuler has been touring for over a decade as a tribute artist of John Denver and invites everyone to come and enjoy the tunes and sing along this Saturday. Doors open at 3 p.m. and the music starts at 4 p.m., there will be light appetizers and you can bring your own beverage. The event is outside of Gracious Savior Church, so you may bring a lawn chair. If there is inclement weather, the show will be moved inside the church. There is no ticket price for this, but an offering will be taken and each attendee is encouraged to donate what they can afford. For more information on Rick Schuler, go to RickSchulerMusic.com.

Wild West Day

Wild West Day has been a Vail Valley tradition for over 30 years. Check out this fundraiser at 4 Eagle Ranch on Sunday.
Education Foundation of Eagle County/Courtesy photo

For 32 years, parents have been helping Eagle County public schools raise funds by putting on the wildly popular Wild West Day at 4 Eagle Ranch neat Wolcott, CO. This one-day event singlehandedly raises money for the public schools hosting one event, therefore streamlining the efforts for asking for donations, silent auction items and people can give once to help all the public schools.

“Before COVID-19, Wild West Day raised $200,000 annually, much-needed funding split equally between our public elementary schools. Despite losing three years of momentum due to the event’s cancellation because of COVID we hope to gain back the traction, camaraderie, and fundraising benefits of Wild West Day this year,” says Tessa Kirchner, Vice President of the Education Foundation of Eagle County (EFEC).

Check out the family fun at 4 Eagle Ranch from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. which includes fun and games like potato sack races, pie and slime eating contest and more. There is also a raffle and you can purchase tickets at HPSRaffleWebsite.org and a silent auction going on via the WildWestDay.org website.

Wax and Wine

Create some fun art this weekend with Wax and Wine with the Alpine Arts Center.
Alpine Arts Center/Courtesy photo

Get your creative juices flowing, with the help of some wine, at Wax and Wine this Saturday night at the Alpine Arts Center in Riverwalk. Wax and Wine is part of the Alpine Art Center’s popular art classes that range from Cocktails and Canvas, to Cocktails and Clay, and many other art forms in between.

How do you incorporate wax into an art project? The term encaustic is used to describe how wax and a pigment can be used to produce art. Throughout the class, which is led by one of Alpine Art Center’s professional artists, you will be taught how to make four find art prints or cards using wax and a cast iron. No prior experience is necessary and it’s a fun way to test your artistic limits. The class runs from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. To make a reservation, go to AlpineArtsCenter.org.

Lifts close Sunday at Beaver Creek

Take advantage of lift access at Beaver Creek to see the fall colors changing. Centennial Express (No. 6) runs this Saturday and Sunday before closing for the off season.
Tricia Swenson/Vail Daily

It’s time to say goodbye to lift service at Beaver Creek. After Sunday, the lifts won’t spin until Beaver Creek’s Opening Day on Wednesday, Nov. 23. (Vail opens on Nov. 11). Beaver Creek’s Centennial Lift (No. 6) will access the hiking and biking trails around Spruce Saddle area and allow bike hauls as well.

If you already have the 2022-23 season Epic Pass, you can ride the chairlift for free. You can still purchase that now and do keep in mind that the Epic Pass price will go up Oct. 9. Once you are up at Spruce Saddle, you have plenty of hiking and biking trails to choose from and it will be the perfect vantage point to see the fall colors changing.

If you want to mix things up a bit, try the Jeep 4×4 tours. The vehicles can hold up to seven people and this mode of transportation can take your group to all sorts of places without the exertion of hiking there. It’s perfect for multi-generations to enjoy the views and the fun facts and stories the guides will share.

Also still available are guided hikes with one of the guides on staff at Beaver Creek. This is a great way to see the mountain and learn about the area. Contact the Hiking Center to book your guide today at 970-754.5373. For more information about lift access, summer hikes, Jeep tours and more, go to BeaverCreek.com.

Rally to make Camp Hale a national monument set for Saturday in Vail

Colorado ski towns could have a national monument right in their backyards, relatively speaking, and supporters hope it happens this fall.

On Saturday, Vet Voice Foundation, community leaders, elected officials, and 10th Mountain Division veterans — including a 100-year-old 10th Mountain veteran — will gather with the public at the Colorado Snowsports Museum in Vail for a rally to support the proposed Camp Hale-Continental Divide National Monument.

“There will be a lot of fun and interactive ways people can get their voices heard and encourage President Joe Biden to designate this to be a national monument, through tweeting, postcards, social media posting, photos with the 10th Mountain Division and signs,” said Susie Kincaid, a rally organizer.

If the area becomes a national monument, it would be “an important step” toward protecting approximately 400,000 acres of land in the Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act from logging, mining and drilling, Kincaid said. CORE is a 10-year-long citizens’ campaign that has passed in the U.S. House of Representatives five times but stalled in the Senate. It would safeguard areas including the Thompson Divide, the San Juan Mountains, the Continental Divide and Camp Hale, and the Curecanti National Recreation Area.

Ruins of Camp Hale’s field house.
Courtesy photo

CORE Act champions, including Sens. Michael Bennet and John Hickenlooper, Rep. Joe Neguse and Gov. Jared Polis, are urging the Biden administration to designate the Camp Hale-Continental Divide region a national monument through executive action.

“The ultimate goal continues to be to pass the bill in Congress and have it signed into law,” Kincaid said. “Local communities across Colorado have joined together to protect these places for over a decade. These executive actions are ways to move forward now.”

According to a study by The Center for Western Priorities, 86 percent of Coloradans support the president taking executive action by designating a new national monument to protect land in the CORE Act, including 92 percent of Democrats, 84 percent of Republicans, and 83 percent of independents surveyed.

Yet, opposition to the designation exists. A letter to Biden from Rep. Lauren Boebert’s office urged him to refuse to make Camp Hale a national monument. The letter expressed “grave concern regarding new efforts to unilaterally impose severe land-use restrictions on the people of Colorado and across the American West. … For years, big-city democrats … have attempted to implement massive new land grabs through the so-called Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy (CORE) Act. The CORE Act land grab seeks to impose increased land restrictions on nearly 400,000 acres, 73,000 of which would be designated as new wilderness and close numerous forms of outdoor recreation and multiple-use, exacerbating wildfires in the process.”

Historical photo of Camp Hale.
Courtesy photo

The last action to protect large regions of public land in Colorado came in the form of the Hermosa Creek Watershed Protection Act in December 2014 and the designation of Browns Canyon National Monument in February 2015.

“Administrative action through a national monument designation via the Antiquities Act by President Biden would permanently protect Camp Hale and the Tenmile Range while honoring Colorado’s military legacy at the home of the 10th Mountain Division ski troops and the vast alpine terrain where they trained,” wrote Jim Ramey, regional director of the Wilderness Society, in a press release. “Protecting this place would be a unique and powerful tribute to those who served our country in World War II, then came home to build our skiing and outdoor recreation economy.”

The Antiquities Act grants the president power to determine how much land to protect under historic or scientific interest.

In a Rep. Julie McCluskie-led letter to President Biden supported by 30 Colorado state senators and representatives, she wrote: “These landscapes are simply too important for conservation and historic and cultural preservation to become the subject of ephemeral political whims. … While our advocacy on behalf of the legislation and our constituents will continue, the protection of these landscapes requires your immediate action. By conserving these lands, you will preserve a rich part of this country’s history through historic landmarks and objects of historic and scientific interest, and we know it will provide a path for your administration to protect additional public lands in Colorado in the future.”

Saturday’s rally at the Snowsports Museum in Vail extends the original 10th

Mountain Division’s “can-do” attitude into the present-day environment, according to Kincaid.

“They had this ‘nothing is impossible’ attitude, and they brought that to the ski industry, and that’s how places like Vail got carved out of a sheep pasture,” Kincaid said.

Prior to the rally, anyone can take part in free events, including hikes and historical tours, in a sort of a choose your own adventure.

At 9 a.m., people can meet at the 10th Mountain Division memorial atop Tennessee Pass where a member of the modern 10th Mountain Division will talk briefly about the healing power of nature and how it has helped soldiers returning from war. Jack Breeding from 10th Mountain Living History will also talk about how Camp Hale developed.

Driving and short walking tours will start at 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at the entrance to Camp Hale. Participants will visit and learn about the camp’s headquarters, field house, climbing wall and rifle range (see related story).

Two hikes also start at 10 a.m. — one for families with small children and a 4-mile moderate hike to Cataract Falls, as people walk in the footsteps of the 10th Mountain troopers while learning about the trail and national monument designation. Mountain Mamas leads the Tyke Hike to the climbing wall soldiers trained on, as well as a waterfall at Camp Hale.

“It will be a fun, educational and exciting day with all of these diverse events,” Kincaid said. “It’s an opportunity to be a part of history. We’re about to have a national monument in Eagle County, and that’s really exciting. We’re hoping it happens this fall.”

But the office of Boebert’s letter warned President Biden that “without local buy-in, any designation of land under the Antiquities Act will be subject to considerable controversy, as well as never-ending litigation. … When the Antiquities Act is used as a workaround to the Congress and the will of the American people, the accompanying land designation rarely receives public support.”

It cited stakeholders who have formally objected to legislation containing CORE Act provisions, including American Energy Alliance, American Farm Bureau Federation, American Forests Resource Council, American Loggers Council, National Mining Association and Colorado organizations, such as Colorado Snowmobile Association, Dolores County, Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, Mesa County, Montezuma County, Trails Preservation Alliance and more.

“While Camp Hale and our service members that were stationed there made important contributions to WWII, we don’t support the efforts of extremist environmentalists … to prohibit timber harvesting and mining on nearly 30,000 acres of land,” the letter stated. “A second request made by our colleagues would permanently withdraw 200,000 acres of land in the Thompson Divide — an area blessed with an abundance of natural gas deposits – from energy exploration. Notwithstanding the fact that natural gas prices have surged to a 14-year high, this request is a solution in search of a problem since the area of controversy has already been administratively withdrawn.”

While Boebert urges the president to “allow the CORE Act to stand or fall on its own merits in the Congress,” CORE supporters will continue to rally to protect the land at Saturday’s event.

Colorado ski towns could have a national monument right in their backyards, relatively speaking, and supporters hope it happens this fall.

On Saturday, Vet Voice Foundation, community leaders, elected officials, and 10th Mountain Division veterans — including a 100-year-old 10th Mountain veteran — will gather with the public at the Colorado Snowsports Museum in Vail for a rally to support the proposed Camp Hale-Continental Divide National Monument.

“There will be a lot of fun and interactive ways people can get their voices heard and encourage President Joe Biden to designate this to be a national monument, through tweeting, postcards, social media posting, photos with the 10th Mountain Division and signs,” said Susie Kincaid, a rally organizer.

If the area becomes a national monument, it would be “an important step” toward protecting approximately 400,000 acres of land in the Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act from logging, mining and drilling, Kincaid said. CORE is a 10-year-long citizens’ campaign that has passed in the U.S. House of Representatives five times but stalled in the Senate. It would safeguard areas including the Thompson Divide, the San Juan Mountains, the Continental Divide and Camp Hale, and the Curecanti National Recreation Area.

CORE Act champions, including Sens. Michael Bennet and John Hickenlooper, Rep. Joe Neguse and Gov. Jared Polis, are urging the Biden administration to designate the Camp Hale-Continental Divide region a national monument through executive action.

“The ultimate goal continues to be to pass the bill in Congress and have it signed into law,” Kincaid said. “Local communities across Colorado have joined together to protect these places for over a decade. These executive actions are ways to move forward now.”

According to a study by The Center for Western Priorities, 86 percent of Coloradans support the president taking executive action by designating a new national monument to protect land in the CORE Act, including 92 percent of Democrats, 84 percent of Republicans, and 83 percent of independents surveyed.

Yet, opposition to the designation exists. A letter to Biden from Rep. Lauren Boebert’s office urged him to refuse to make Camp Hale a national monument. The letter expressed “grave concern regarding new efforts to unilaterally impose severe land-use restrictions on the people of Colorado and across the American West. … For years, big-city democrats … have attempted to implement massive new land grabs through the so-called Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy (CORE) Act. The CORE Act land grab seeks to impose increased land restrictions on nearly 400,000 acres, 73,000 of which would be designated as new wilderness and close numerous forms of outdoor recreation and multiple-use, exacerbating wildfires in the process.”

The last action to protect large regions of public land in Colorado came in the form of the Hermosa Creek Watershed Protection Act in December 2014 and the designation of Browns Canyon National Monument in February 2015.

“Administrative action through a national monument designation via the Antiquities Act by President Biden would permanently protect Camp Hale and the Tenmile Range while honoring Colorado’s military legacy at the home of the 10th Mountain Division ski troops and the vast alpine terrain where they trained,” wrote Jim Ramey, regional director of the Wilderness Society, in a press release. “Protecting this place would be a unique and powerful tribute to those who served our country in World War II, then came home to build our skiing and outdoor recreation economy.”

The Antiquities Act grants the president power to determine how much land to protect under historic or scientific interest.

In a Rep. Julie McCluskie-led letter to President Biden supported by 30 Colorado state senators and representatives, she wrote: “These landscapes are simply too important for conservation and historic and cultural preservation to become the subject of ephemeral political whims. … While our advocacy on behalf of the legislation and our constituents will continue, the protection of these landscapes requires your immediate action. By conserving these lands, you will preserve a rich part of this country’s history through historic landmarks and objects of historic and scientific interest, and we know it will provide a path for your administration to protect additional public lands in Colorado in the future.”

Saturday’s rally at the Snowsports Museum in Vail extends the original 10th

Mountain Division’s “can-do” attitude into the present-day environment,

according to Kincaid.

“They had this ‘nothing is impossible’ attitude, and they brought that to the ski industry, and that’s how places like Vail got carved out of a sheep pasture,” Kincaid said.

Prior to the rally, anyone can take part in free events, including hikes and historical tours, in a sort of a choose your own adventure.

At 9 a.m., people can meet at the 10th Mountain Division memorial atop Tennessee Pass where a member of the modern 10th Mountain Division will talk briefly about the healing power of nature and how it has helped soldiers returning from war. Jack Breeding from 10th Mountain Living History will also talk about how Camp Hale developed.

Driving and short walking tours will start at 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at the entrance to Camp Hale. Participants will visit and learn about the camp’s headquarters, field house, climbing wall and rifle range (see related story).

Two hikes also start at 10 a.m. — one for families with small children and a 4-mile moderate hike to Cataract Falls, as people walk in the footsteps of the 10th Mountain troopers while learning about the trail and national monument designation. Mountain Mamas leads the Tyke Hike to the climbing wall soldiers trained on, as well as a waterfall at Camp Hale.

“It will be a fun, educational and exciting day with all of these diverse events,” Kincaid said. “It’s an opportunity to be a part of history. We’re about to have a national monument in Eagle County, and that’s really exciting. We’re hoping it happens this fall.”

But the office of Boebert’s letter warned President Biden that “without local buy-in, any designation of land under the Antiquities Act will be subject to considerable controversy, as well as never-ending litigation. … When the Antiquities Act is used as a workaround to the Congress and the will of the American people, the accompanying land designation rarely receives public support.”

It cited stakeholders who have formally objected to legislation containing CORE Act provisions, including American Energy Alliance, American Farm Bureau Federation, American Forests Resource Council, American Loggers Council, National Mining Association and Colorado organizations, such as Colorado Snowmobile Association, Dolores County, Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, Mesa County, Montezuma County, Trails Preservation Alliance and more.

“While Camp Hale and our service members that were stationed there made important contributions to WWII, we don’t support the efforts of extremist environmentalists … to prohibit timber harvesting and mining on nearly 30,000 acres of land,” the letter stated. “A second request made by our colleagues would permanently withdraw 200,000 acres of land in the Thompson Divide — an area blessed with an abundance of natural gas deposits – from energy exploration. Notwithstanding the fact that natural gas prices have surged to a 14-year high, this request is a solution in search of a problem since the area of controversy has already been administratively withdrawn.”

While Boebert urges the president to “allow the CORE Act to stand or fall on its own merits in the Congress,” CORE supporters will continue to rally to protect the land at Saturday’s event.