| VailDaily.com

Open for Business: Habitat ReStore Vail Valley

Name of business: Habitat ReStore Vail Valley

Physical address: 751 Chambers Avenue, Eagle, CO 81631

Phone number: 970-328-1119                

Email: restore@habitatvailvalley.org        

Website: habitatvailvalley.org/restore. Shop online website: shop.restorevailvalley.org

What goods or services are you offering at this time? 

Moving in? Renovating? DIYing? Make the Habitat ReStore your first stop!

At the ReStore, you’ll find discount furniture, gently used appliances and other unique items that will make your home improvement project a whole lot easier—and more affordable. Plus, we have a selection of windows, doors, tile, sinks and other building materials ready for installation. And, all proceeds from the store fund Habitat for Humanity’s local building efforts.

How have you adjusted to serve your customers during these unprecedented times?

During the pandemic, Habitat ReStore launched a new online store: shop.habitatvailvalley.org. Curbside pick-up is available for all purchases made online.

We hope to be operating at 100% in the near future, but currently, we are open for shopping with limited hours, Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m. All ReStore shoppers are required to wear a mask or face-covering in the store and our staff is not able to help load items into vehicles. In addition, we ask that shoppers maintain six feet distance from other shoppers and ReStore staff.

We recently resumed our donation pick-up service. We accept donations of new or gently used furniture, appliances, housewares, building materials and more.

How can the community support you?

The need for affordable housing is as critical as ever. Every ReStore purchase supports the construction of six homes that Habitat Vail Valley is currently building in Gypsum at Grace Avenue. You can support the ReStore by shopping online, purchasing a ReStore gift certificate, scheduling a donation drop-off or shopping at our store in Eagle.

What’s the best source to keep up to date with your offerings?

Like @restorevailvalley on Facebook to see photos of new arrivals to the store and to learn about upcoming sales and discounts.

What are your plans going forward as the “new normal” evolves?

Looking to the future, we are currently hiring a donations coordinator and cashier to help the ReStore fully resume its operations. Job descriptions for both positions can be found on our website.

Open for Business: Eagle Climbing and Fitness

Name of Business: Eagle Climbing and Fitness

Physical address: 700 Chambers Ave., A7 Eagle, CO 81631

Phone number: 970-328-0893

Email: info@eagleclimbing.com

Website: eagleclimbing.com

What goods or services are you offering at this time?

 We are excited to offer climbing, yoga and fitness for all ages and abilities. We have adult climbing workshops, fitness and yoga classes and are looking to add more yoga classes soon. We have kids climbing day camps every weekday throughout the summer.

How have you adjusted to serve your customers during these unprecedented times?

We’ve implemented several social distancing, hygiene and personal responsibility measures throughout our facility adhering to the county’s Public Health Order. We are requiring that all participants read and sign our guidelines to show understanding and commitment to following our new procedures. We’ve also set up an online reservation system for members and guests to participate in climbing, yoga or fitness offerings. 

How can the community support you?

Come on in and enjoy climbing again or for the first time! New customers can purchase gift certificates, punch cards, memberships or day passes. Old members can unfreeze or renew their memberships. And we’d love to see new faces in our classes, workshops and day camps! 

What’s the best source to keep up to date with your offerings?

Check out our website and social media: (instagram.com/eagleclimbing and facebook.com/eagleclimbing) or just give us a call.

What’s the response been?

People are so grateful that we’re open again. People are excited to climb, learn new skills in our workshops, and parents are incredibly psyched that we’re offering day camps. We are so thankful to everyone who helped support us through our closure and continue to support us now that we’ve reopened.

What are your plans going forward as the “new normal” evolves?

We will continue building strength in our community by creating and offering responsible classes, workshops, and camps, while collaborating with the Health Dept. to maintain appropriate protocols as we move through the Transition Trail Map. Our goal is to keep our community healthy, happy and strong!

Open for Business: The Home Outpost Furniture Showroom & Home Staging

Name of business: The Home Outpost Furniture Showroom & Home Staging 

Physical address: 150 Cooley Mesa Rd. Gypsum, Colorado 81637

Phone number:  970-524-1072

Email:  info@thehomeoutpost.com

Website:  www.thehomeoutpost.com

What goods or services are you offering at this time? 

Our showroom and our home staging division are open.

How have you adjusted to serve your customers during these unprecedented times?

This marks our fifth year in business in Eagle County. We continue to learn and grow as we move through this process of being a business owner. Moving forward we have an obligation to our people and our customers to adapt to our new normal, continue to make adjustments as we go through this together. Our team is committed to providing a safe and healthy experience inside our showroom and at our home staging projects. As we balance the government regulations, safety and social responsibilities of our business for you as our customers and team members, please know we are following all of the safety guidelines set in place by the Eagle County government.

How can the community support you?

We ask that you shop our new collections in our showroom. Work with us for all of your home staging needs. Let us help you get your property SOLD! Work with us for all of your turn-key rental properties and our Resort Rental Staging Program. Let us help you get premium rentals.

The best source to keep up to date with your offerings?

Visit our website, our Facebook page (The Home Outpost) and on Instagram ( thehomeoutpost).

What’s the response been?

Our clients are very grateful we are open once again for many reasons. We have multiple home staging projects that we put on hold over the past couple of months, now we can now move forward and get them staged. As we approach the selling season in the Vail Valley it will be nice to be able to assist the real estate agents and their clients as they prepare their properties to sell. We have new furniture and decor collections arriving at the showroom weekly. We also take high-end designer consignment collections and we have had to turn away all incoming consignors over the past few months. We can now begin receiving collections as we move forward. We are also happy to announce that our Estate Sale Division will be up and running this summer season, allowing our clients to host in-home estate sales.

What are your plans going forward as the “new normal” evolves?

No doubt this is a challenging time for businesses, but this is no time to sit back and wait, this is the time to thrive. We hope to help the real estate market in the Vail Valley create their silver lining – as we look for the upside of the opportunity that is being created.   

As The Home Outpost grapples with our new normal, we are doing our best to figure out what it means to be a company during this time, and most importantly what it means to be a human during this time. Thank you for all of your support and we are proud to be opening our doors again and we so look forward to seeing you in person soon! Stay HEALTHY, Stay SAFE, Stay UNITED, BE WELL!  

Open for Business: Gypsum Recreation Center

Name of business: Mountain Recreation, Gypsum Recreation Center

Physical address: 52 Lundgren Blvd., Gypsum, CO 81637

Phone number: 970-777-8888

Email: info@mountainrec.org

Website: MountainRec.org

What goods or services are you offering at this time? 

The Gypsum Recreation Center is now open for various fitness classes and one-hour fitness floor sessions under strict social distancing protocols. Facemasks and reservations are required to enter the facility. Reservations can be made up to two days in advance on our website. Visits to the Gypsum Rec Center will be provided free of charge until June 1 for everyone in our community. We’ll be open with adjusted hours to ensure that we keep to the mandated number of people and so that our staff can clean, disinfect and sanitize the facility and all its common spaces, equipment, structures and fixtures. Visitors must be at least 13 years old and kids ages 13 and 14 must be accompanied by an adult.

How have you adjusted to serve your customers during these unprecedented times?

Our current hours are Mondays through Fridays from 5 a.m. until 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Saturdays we are open from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Our staff deep cleans and sanitizes Mondays through Fridays at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. We also have round-the-clock spot cleaning and sanitizing.

How can the community support you?

We ask that the community remember to make reservations before visiting, stay in the section you choose when registering, wear a face mask and wash your hands frequently. We will be conducting a verbal COVID-19 symptoms check for every person before entering the facility, and we ask that you stay home if you are feeling any COVID-19 symptoms. If able, the community can help support Mountain Recreation by continuing their annual or monthly membership to the Gypsum Rec Center.

What’s the best source to keep up to date with your offerings?

The best source to keep up to date is by signing up for our email alerts at mountainrec.org. The community can also follow our bilingual Mountain Recreation Facebook page for the latest information.

What’s the response been?

We have had a great response from the community so far as to the level of commitment to safety and health our Gypsum Rec Center has established during this reopening. The first day we reopened, we saw about 120 people throughout the day. The next day, we had about 160 across our fitness floor and fitness classes, while maintaining mandated group sizes of 10 or less. We look forward to offering more fitness opportunities to our community as Eagle County Public Health orders allow.

What are your plans going forward as the “new normal” evolves?

Moving forward, our new normal will heavily rely on our community’s support around social distancing protocols. As we move through Eagle County Public Health’s Transition Trail Map, we will be able to offer more services and open up amenities that shift from individual activities to controlled group activities. We are aiming to open up our summer camps and programming starting June 1, however, the new normal will require ourselves and our members to be cognizant of a 6-foot social distancing requirement, wear masks and wash their hands frequently.  

Open for Business: The Thrifty Shop

Name of business: The Thrifty Shop (Edwards and Eagle)

Physical address: Edwards – 34510 Hwy 6 #C2 Edwards, CO 81632, Eagle – 1160 Chambers Ave, Eagle, CO 81631

Phone Number: Edwards – 970-926-7134, Eagle – 970-328-1444

Email: info@vailvalleycares

Website: vailvalleycares.com

What goods or services are you offering at this time? 

We are so excited to be open! Our temporary hours for donations are 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. We are open for shoppers inside the store (please wear masks) from 12 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 12 to 5 p.m. on Saturday. We can also come and pick up items, call the closest store for a pickup. Hopefully, we will get back to our regular hours as things begin to normalize.

How have you adjusted to serve your customers during these unprecedented times?  

We are juggling our donors, store customers, and the nonprofits we give grants to. We’ve temporarily adjusted our hours, from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. We are accepting donations outside. We know people have been spring cleaning for the past six weeks and have a lot of donations so we are gearing up for the avalanche. From 12 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday we can allow up to eight customers (with masks on) in the store at a time. For our nonprofit grant applicants, we have pushed our due date back from April 13 to June 1. Hopefully, this will help our applicants to get a handle on their most pressing needs as well as help us figure out how much we can give away this year as we all recover.

How can the community support you?

Help us help the nonprofits we give grants to. Basically, bring us your donations and come see what we have that’s new, which should be most things since we were still skiing when we shut down and now it seems like summer.

What’s the best source to keep up to date with your offerings?

Our Vail Daily ads, our website at vailvalleycares.com and our Instagram / Facebook pages at vvcthriftyshops.

What’s the response been?

Positive responses from everyone, and on Instagram we got a “thumbs up” from the Sheriff’s Office and a “Yay” and a “FREAKING FINALLY!”

What are your plans going forward as the “new normal” evolves?  

We’ll do our best to anticipate needs but I think being able to respond to the changing needs of the community will be most important as we all come out of this and get back on our feet.

Open for Business: The Back Bowl

Name of business: The Back Bowl

Physical address: 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle, Colorado

Phone number: 970-328-2695

Email: info@thebackbowl.com

Website: thebackbowl.com

What goods or services are you offering at this time?

Bowling, billiards, arcade and takeout dining.

How have you adjusted to serve your customers during these unprecedented times?

We’ve set up protocols for meeting and exceeding Eagle County’s Phase 1 health and safety standards with added precautions for additional sanitizing of balls, shoes and all other high touch surfaces between uses by customers. To maintain social distancing, no more than five bowlers will be allowed on a lane and no more than 10 bowlers every four lanes. For this reason, we will highly encourage reservations to facilitate adhering to these requirements.

How can the community support you?

Come out and enjoy bowling again! Call ahead for details and to reserve your time slot from 4-9 p.m. daily. We also have an expansive takeout menu at the Bowlmor Café, with service from 5-9 p.m. daily.

What’s the best source to keep up to date with your offerings?

Go to our website, thebackbowl.com, or visit our Facebook page (you can link directly from our website). Or just give us a call.

What’s the response been?

The new Public Order just began April 27, so we have only been open for bowling since then and have limited response time thus far. Messages posted from customers on Facebook are both supportive and critical of reopening for bowling in Phase 1. We realize we will have to work hard to help our customers feel safe when they bowl.

What are your plans going forward as the “new normal” evolves?

We have a large venue, so social distancing, with whatever occupancy limitations are imposed by Eagle County Department of Public Health, should not be a problem for both bowling now and for dining in our restaurant/bar when that part of our business will be allowed to reopen in Phase 2 of the Eagle County reopening order.

Local yoga, cardio, barre, spin classes all online: Tricia’s weekend picks 3/20/2020

Earlier this week, the weather was nice enough to get outside and walk, run, hike and bike but it is still winter outside and the colder temperatures and precipitation will come and go. Don’t let the weather deter you from keeping a fitness routine going during the coronavirus crisis. To help you stay active, local gyms and fitness centers are helping you take the workouts home. Here’s a look at what area gyms are doing:

Revolution Power Yoga – Avon

Philosophy:

“We’re all in this together!” said Julie Kiddoo, owner of Revolution Power Yoga in Avon. “Offering online classes is a great opportunity to stay in the work, practice alongside your global yoga community and experience the power of comm-UNITY and connection.”

Offering:

Right now, we are offering daily one-hour Power classes. This is an energizing, challenging and powerful class based on Baptiste Yoga’s ‘Journey Into Power’ sequence and suitable for all levels that will leave you feeling rinsed and revitalized. Expect to move, sweat and be transformed!

Right now through March 22 classes are free and open to everyone via Zoom. We will be re-evaluating this the week of March 23. Stay connected daily on our Facebook and Instagram pages, as class times and teachers will change every day.

Take Away:

“At Revolution Power Yoga, our purpose is to elevate, transform, and empower the community to live in possibility, connection, and discovery.” Kiddoo said. “We will come out of this stronger together.”

PeloDog Studio – Avon

Philosophy:

“The main reason we did this is simple, we wanted to offer a free, easy and effective way to keep people moving and fit in the comfort of their own home,” said Jen Kaplan, owner of PeloDog Studio in Avon. “The community at my studio is so important to me and I wanted to offer some, albeit small, means to stay connected to each other and the studio.”

Offering:

I am certified in a variety of fitness modalities and will be offering a variety of classes including Pilates, sculpt, core & roll, equipment-free cardio, and rides for those who do have in-home bikes. My goal is to offer variety, to keep things simple and safe, and to make workouts accessible to all levels.

All of my sessions, except for rides, will either require no props, or I will offer creative substitutes for gym equipment. For example, instead of using dumbbells for sculpt class, you can use water bottles or soup cans. 

Classes are free right now on www.vimeo.com/pelodog and you do not need to be a member to participate. All updates will be on the PeloDog’s Instagram and Facebook pages.

Take Away:

“Working out is one of the best ways to relieve stress and produce positive endorphins,” Kaplan said. “Simple workouts will do wonders to maintain physical and mental strength during this unprecedented and strange time.”

Dogma Athletica – Edwards

Philosophy:

“Humans are designed to move. It relieves stress, bolsters the immune system, and calms the mind. We are inundated with information that will create anxiety,” said Rod Connolly, owner of Dogma Athletica in Edwards. “Moving also gets your creative juices flowing so you can think outside of the box to move forward during this uncertain time.”

Offering:

We are offering Live it Lean which is metabolic conditioning, Live It Strong for functional strength and Live It Loose for active mobility. Using mindfulness, high-intensity movement and decompression to put yourself in the best place physically, mentally and emotionally.

We have both paid and complimentary offerings. You do not need to be a member but to get set up for the paid classes email Dogma Athletica general manager Jessica Moser at jessicadogma@gmail.com. To access our free “Twenty Minutes to a Better Day” class, follow Dogma Athletica on Facebook and Instagram.

Take Away:

“Look for opportunity in change. Utilize this as an impetus to practice healthy habits and self-care you may have been putting off. Get clear on what’s most important to you and focus your energies,” Connolly said. “Notice what you have in your life, not what feels missing.”

Barre Forte Vail Valley – Edwards

Philosophy:

“Community is so important. We are in this together and by supporting us, we can support you,” said Jessica Denton, co-owner of Barre Forte in Edwards with Beth Robinson. “Fitness isn’t just about burning calories it’s about having a strong mind and body.”

Offering:

We’ll be offering Barre Express, a 45-minute barre class, Sculpt class, which is a low impact total-body workout, Oula, which is a fun dance fitness class, Sculpt Yoga and Pilates Barre. We’re lucky to be able to stream classes that provide almost the same experience as a studio experience.

All current Barre Forte Vail Valley members have access. New clients will be able to purchase a drop-in, 8-class pack, or unlimited streaming. Our full schedule is on the Mindbody app or follow us on Instagram @barrefortevailvalley.

Take Away:

“Staying active and healthy is important all the time, but especially right now. The amazing thing about Barre workouts is that it truly changes your body, by using “almost” only your body.” Denton said. “Movement is really important. We all need movement mentally and emotionally.”

Endorphin – Eagle Ranch

Philosophy:

Endorphin’s mission is to deliver the best experience by the best instructors to the happiest community. “We are all about providing movement experiences and making people feel welcomed and supported,” said Corina Lindley, owner of Endorphin in Eagle Ranch. “During this COVID-19 timeframe, we want to keep that feeling going virtually by providing online classes.”

Offering:

We will be offering up to three classes a day, free of charge to anyone. If you are already a member or want to join with our introductory rate you can do that. But, if you are experiencing a financial crisis due to COVID-19, we still want you to participate and we want to support you.

As for classes, we’ll have HIIT, Barre, Yoga, Metabolic Conditioning and other group classes where little or no weights or other equipment is necessary. Access classes through Zoom once you create an account at www.myendorphin.com.

We have also allowed our members to take two to three pieces of equipment to their home, including stationary bikes, to use to stay active in addition to going outside.

Take Away:

“The energy and endorphins you get from working out will help sustain you and keep your stress levels down to keep you well. The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force recommends at least 30 minutes a day of exercise for adults and to 60 minutes a day for kids,” Lindley said. “If you are creative, you can still get your exercise in during these trying times.”

These are just a few gyms in the area that are providing online access to workouts. Check with your favorite gym to see if they are offering anything online at this time.

Vertical challenges, history hikes, live music and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 2/21/20

Talons Challenge at Beaver Creek

For 17 years, skiers and snowboarders have taken to the Talons area of Beaver Creek to conquer 14 of the resort’s toughest black and double black diamond runs in order to have bragging rights and a sense of satisfaction after conquering over 26,000 vertical feet in one day. Are you ready for the Talons Challenge?

This Saturday, competitors of all ages will tackle the steep terrain on Grouse Mountain, Birds of Prey and Larkspur Bowl. In between runs you can always stop and rest at the Talons restaurant, nestled at the base of the three lifts that service this area. The Talons restaurant will also play host to the Talons Challenge après-ski party from 12 to 4 p.m. The celebration will continue down in Beaver Creek Village from 4 to 6 p.m. with additional entertainment and giveaways.

The physical challenge is also a fundraiser for SOS Outreach, an organization that uses adventure sports to teach underserved youth core values and leadership development. At the base of each lift, kids from SOS Outreach programs and volunteers will be there to keep you honest by marking your lanyard after each run. The kids have also been known to give you plenty of words of encouragement to keep your energy levels and spirits up.

A $40 registration includes your access to the Talons Challenge, a lanyard and credential for tracking your runs, special 17th Edition Talons Challenge swag and food. Please note that your lift ticket is not included in registration.

From $160, the Ultimate Talon limited edition package gets you additional perks beyond the standard Talons Challenge registration. If you go the Ultimate route you will get a commemorative Talons Challenge Vanir backpack from Helly Hansen (a $130 value) as well as a $40 donation to SOS Outreach and discounted drinks at the village après-ski event. The Ultimate Talon packages tend to sell out. To learn more go to www.beavercreek.com and search for Signature Events. 

Ski with Jonny Moseley

Vail Mountain also has a ski benefit on Saturday. Can Do MS is calling it “powder with a purpose” and wants everyone to come out for its annual Ski for MS event, which brings teams from all over the region to Vail to participate in amateur races, a costume contest and an après-ski party to help fund its programs for those living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).  

The locally-based Can Do MS organization was formerly known as The Jimmy Heuga Center for Multiple Sclerosis. Jimmy Heuga was an Olympic bronze medalist in alpine skiing. He and teammate Billy Kidd made America proud when Kidd finished second and Heuga finished third on the podium in Innsbruck, Austria at the 1964 Olympic Games.

Heuga was diagnosed with MS early in his career and he revolutionized treatment with a whole-body approach. He wanted to focus on the things that those with MS can do versus the things they can’t do.

Can Do MS hosts seven ski events from California to New Hampshire, inviting people to participate in a day of fun while also raising funds to help those living with MS. This year the teams will be joined by Olympic skier Jonny Moseley.

The Express Lift at the bottom of Gondola One in Vail Village will serve as the home base for registration on Saturday from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. During the day there will be amateur ski races at the Epic Mix racecourse near the Avanti Express lift. A Celebration Ski Down to honor Can Do MS Founder, Jimmy Heuga will be held at the bottom of the Epic Mix race arena at 3 p.m. and the group will return to the Express Lift bar at Mountain Plaza for the après ski awards party and raffle from 3 to 6 p.m. Enjoy live music by Jonny Mogambo, free beer thanks to Bonfire Brewing, appetizers, musical chairs and raffles.

There is no cause or cure for MS but Can Do MS provides hope and a pathway to take charge of the disease. To find out more please visit www.cando-ms.org.

A country music queen and music fit for a king

Country music singer Sara Evans will grace the Vilar Performing Arts Center with her beautiful voice and soulful lyrics on Friday at 7 p.m.

She’s had five No. 1 singles, sold millions of albums worldwide, won the Academy of Country Music’s Top Female Vocalist Award and claimed a Country Music Association trophy for her signature song, “Born To Fly.”

Evans grew up singing and was a part of her family’s band in has been in and out of Nashville recording songs and albums as a solo artist. You may remember hits such as “A Little Bit Stronger,” “I Could Not Ask For More,” “Born to Fly,” “Suds In The Bucket,” “No Place That Far,” “My Heart Can’t Tell You No” and more.

Enjoy a little storytelling at this intimate venue with this award-winning county music star. Tickets are $78 and you can find out more by visiting www.vilarpac.org.

Also performing at the Vilar Performing Arts Center this weekend is the King’s Singers on Sunday at 7 p.m. This British a cappella group has been around for over 50 years and it still features the same vocal formation of two countertenors, one tenor, two baritones and a bass singer.

The King’s Singers will perform “Royal Blood,” a program that investigates the life and legacy of 16th century King Henry VIII. From London’s Royal Albert Hall to the Opera House in Sydney or New York’s Carnegie Hall, take advantage of the King’s Singers sharing their vocal qualities in Beaver Creek.

Tickets start at $48 for adults and are $10 for students. Or, buy three tickets to this show and get the fourth ticket free. This show is also part of the VPAC ticket package: Pick three shows for $90, pick five shows for $175 or pick eight shows for $240. The show is also part of the Pay Your Age (18-30 years old) ticket program. Go to www.vilarpac.org for more details.

Après ski with Vail Jazz

We don’t hear a lot about Vail Jazz in the wintertime. For 26 years the sounds of jazz have dominated outdoor venues from the Vail Farmers Market to the Ford Amphitheater. But this Friday, Vail Jazz will host a special pop-up après ski party at the Minturn Saloon with the sounds of the Burnsville Band.

Head over to this iconic Minturn bar and restaurant and enjoy the free live music as well as free drinks and appetizers from 3 to 5 p.m.

“Every local knows that the Minturn Saloon is one of the valley’s most boisterous, under-the-radar venues for a celebratory drink after a day on the slopes. We want to ramp that up a notch,” said Vail Jazz executive director James Kenly in a press release. “It makes sense to add après ski to our wheelhouse with this pop-up event and also provide a glimpse of the musical energy to come this summer.”

The Burnsville Band is lead by Steve Burns, who has been playing the guitar since he was 11 and will be guiding the audience with some deep, soul searching blues music. The Burnsville Band has developed a regional following as well as a reputation for bringing a joyful buzz to any party.

Head to Minturn, which is a close drive from Vail or Beaver Creek ski areas, or leave work a little early this Friday to take part in this winter celebration with Vail Jazz. For more information, visit www.vailjazz.org.

Historical hike

In addition to the daily snowshoe hikes, evening snowshoe tours, full moon snowshoe tours and backcountry snowshoe hikes, Walking Mountains Science Center also hosts history trips on snowshoes.

Walking Mountains’ mission is “to awaken a sense of wonder and inspire environmental stewardship and sustainability through natural science education.” They take that one step further by adding historical tidbits of Eagle County’s legacy with the addition of the Hiking Through History tours.

Walking Mountains has teamed up with the Eagle County Historical Society for the snowshoe history treks. Saturday’s hike takes place in East Brush Creek outside of Eagle. Local historian Kathy Heicher will share stories about Ranger Brown, who tended the forest from 1920-1935.

Ranger Brown handled tasks including managing grazing allotments for local ranchers, building key trails and roads, building Forest Service cabins and offices throughout Eagle County. He also handled predator control issues involving wolves. Brown also managed the Civilian Conservation Corps camp established in 1940. Learn about this fascinating character who helped shape many of the trails and forest resources in our valley.

“Kathy Heicher and the Eagle County Historical Society always do an amazing job with us for Hiking Through History,” said Paul Abling, marketing and communications director for Walking Mountains. We’ve explored the history of many areas together including Camp Hale, Red Cliff, Fulford, and the Sweetwater Cave. We are excited to learn all about the history of another area, East Brush Creek, on this fun snowshoe history trek.”

The tour is set up to be a half-day excursion with the hike itself about 2.5 miles in distance. Snowshoes and poles are provided. Bring your own lunch for a post-tour picnic at Yeoman Park Campground. The program meets at Walking Mountains Science Center at 9 a.m. Register online in advance: www.walkingmountains.org.

The holiday season isn’t over until Eagle sets it on fire

EAGLE — In Eagle and Gypsum, the holiday season isn’t over until residents send it up in flames.

That will happen on Monday.

Monday’s 12th night Christmas tree bonfire at Eagle Town Park will be lit at 6 p.m. It’s a downvalley tradition that dates back to the 1950s. It’s a simple small-town affair that finds neighbors warming themselves by the fire and sipping hot beverages. Kids and adults strap on skates and step out on the town park rink for a nighttime spin.

Monday marks the 12th day of Christmas, as heralded by the popular carol. Back in its Jan. 8, 1953 edition, the Eagle Valley Enterprise reported: “The ancient custom of burning the Yule trees on the 12th night following Christmas was observed in Eagle Tuesday night when around 100 adults and children gathered at the skating pond in southwest town to witness the burning of a huge pile of Christmas trees and enjoy skating on the town’s pond.”

Not much has changed, except that the bonfire location is no longer in southwest Eagle — not because it has moved but because the town has grown up around it

Dr. L.W. Simmons was credited with coming up with the 12th Night plan.

“Simmons stated that he hoped the custom would be carried on next year and that plans would be made far enough in advance that more persons could participate,” noted the Enterprise back in 1953.

Through the years, Eagle Lions Club members have been in charge of supplying hot chocolate for the bonfire and the Greater Eagle Fire Department has been called in to do the actual tree burning.

12th Night in history

While Eagle has made the holiday its own, 12th Night has a broader history. The holiday is also known as Epiphany — the religious observance that celebrates the arrival of the three wise men to worship the baby Jesus. According to the telling, the trio didn’t arrive at the manger scene — despite what nativity scenes the world over depict — until a few days later.

Although Epiphany has solemn roots, through the ages 12th Night developed some jovial activities. King Alfred, a ninth-century English monarch, was a true believer of the holiday season. He decreed the Christmas season would include Dec. 25 and the 12 days following it, thus beginning the 12 days of Christmas.

In Elizabethan England, 12th Night was similar to April Fools’ Day. Children played tricks on passers-by and bakeries sold special 12th Night cakes decorated with stars, castles, kings, dragons, palaces and churches. People would drink cider and call out “wes hal,” meaning good health. This toast evolved into the word “wassail.”

William Shakespeare wrote a comedy —“12th Night” — about the holiday, reflecting its joyous mood. Legend says the play was first performed on Jan. 6, 1601, at Whitehall Palace when Queen Elizabeth entertained a distinguished Italian guest, the Duke of Bracciano.

Syrian legend says wild animals stay in dens and caves on Epiphany Eve and at midnight trees kneel in adoration of Jesus. This legend also says wishes are fulfilled on 12th Night.

Latin cultures regard Epiphany as both a solemn religious festival and the beginning of the pre-Lent season. Mexico’s greatest pilgrimage is the Epiphany march to the shrine of the miraculous Lord of Chalma in the valley of southwest of Mexico City.

While 12th Night revelry has declined in popularity, the holiday is still celebrated in parts of England. The trip of the magi is re-enacted each year at the Chapel Royal at St. James Palaces in London. The traditional gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh are ceremonially presented at the church alter.

In the present Christian tradition, Epiphany has a threefold meaning. It celebrates the appearance of the wise men, Jesus’ baptism and his first miracle of the changing water into wine at the wedding feast of Cana. The three events, according to the Bible, occurred on the same date in different years.

More ski resorts opening, holiday craft fairs, art walks and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/8/19

More ski resorts open

Although the calendar still says autumn, winter is here in the minds of many skiers and snowboarders who are enjoying lift-accessed skiing and riding in Colorado. Arapahoe Basin and Keystone have been open since mid-October with Loveland, Eldora, Monarch and Wolf Creek opening their slopes a few weeks later. This Friday marks the opening day for two more Colorado resorts: Breckenridge and Copper Mountain. A snowy and cool October brought a lot of natural snow to the resorts and snowmaking crews have combined forces with Mother Nature to allow more than one run to be open this early in the season.

Breckenridge Ski Resort will offer nearly 200 acres of terrain on Peak 8 for opening day. Skiers and riders will have access to a variety of groomed trails on lower Peak 8 accessed by the Colorado SuperChair, Rocky Mountain SuperChair, 5-Chair and Rip’s Ride. The resort will offer skiing and riding for all ability levels on trails including Springmeier, 4 O’Clock, Columbine, Northstar, Duke’s, Claimjumper and Trygve’s.

Lifts are set to open at 9 a.m. while the BreckConnect Gondola will open at 8 a.m. to provide access from Town and the Gondola lots to the base of Peak 8. The official first chair celebration and banner-breaking will take place on the Colorado SuperChair. Before the rope drops, guests can enjoy complimentary waffles and DJ music on the snow.

Take note of some of the new conveniences at Peak 8 such as escalators, skier drop-off parking, skier services facilities, rental and retail space, public restrooms and more. You can buy a day pass or Epic Passes are still available through Nov. 24. For information on the resort, go to www.breckenridge.com. For information on Epic Passes, visit www.epicpass.com.

Copper Mountain will also open on Friday with more than 90 acres of terrain featuring skiing and riding for all ability levels. The American Eagle lift will begin turning at 9 a.m. and shortly thereafter the Easy Rider and Excelerator lifts will spin.

Trails that are expected to open Friday include Ptarmigan, Rhapsody, Main Vein, Fairplay and Easy Rider. Additionally, Lower Bouncer is expected to feature a Woodward Pop-Up park consisting of one jump and about a dozen features. Skiers and riders can look for more natural terrain to open as conditions allow.

Throughout the weekend, guests can enjoy free live music, giveaways and a variety of dining and après ski options throughout Center Village.

Copper Mountain season passes are on sale for $589 for adults and $289 for children until November 18 when prices increase $40 and $20 respectively. The last chance to purchase Copper Mountain Four Packs for $279 in-person and online is now through November 18. For more information on opening day and passes, visit www.coppercolorado.com.

To show Copper’s appreciation for military veterans, the resort will offer $60 lift tickets on Veteran’s Day, Monday, Nov. 11. The $60 discounted lift tickets are available for one day only to all skiers and riders and must be purchased online before midnight Monday.

Vail Nordic Ski Swap

We just had the big Vail Ski & Snowboard Club swap where you could get everything you needed for alpine skiing and snowboarding a few weeks ago. This weekend, the Vail Nordic Center hosts the 35th annual Nordic Ski Swap at the Vail Nordic and Golf Clubhouse in Vail.

Winters are long in Colorado, so switch things up by switching out your activities. Taking a day off from alpine skiing or snowboarding and heading out to do some cross country skiing or skate skiing lets you experience the outdoors in a different way. Telemark gear and alpine touring gear can get you up to that next hut trip or allow you to avoid the crowds by skiing in the backcountry. Or skin up the mountain before work to get some cardio in before you start your day. Whatever your mode of transportation, it all provides a great workout (remember, the holidays are coming and you need to fit into those ski pants).

Getting into a new sport can be expensive. By going to a swap, you are able to find the gear that will allow you to try out the sport and see if it is right for you without paying retail.

Buy or sell skate skis, touring and track skis as well as telemark, backcountry and snowshoe equipment. Winter clothing will be on sale as well. Drop off Nordic gear you want to sell between 2 to 6 p.m. on Friday. The Nordic Ski Swap takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday with discounts starting after 12 p.m. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Homestake Peak School Nordic program. Please note that it is cash or check only for purchases. Visit www.vailrec.com or call 970-479-2279 for more information.

2nd Friday Artwalks on Broadway

Eagle Arts presents 2nd Friday Artwalks this Friday, but this time it’s extra special because the art community in Eagle is celebrating its first anniversary. What started out as an idea artist Tara Novak of Artspace workshop+gallery hatched with the Vail Valley Art Guild and Red Canyon Cafe to host the first Eagle Art Walk last November has grown into an event that encompasses more than art.

Broadway Street in Eagle will turn into a holiday market with galleries, shops and restaurants offering art exhibitions, live music, interactive activities, sales and specials.

Presented by Eagle Arts and the Broadway Business Community, join family and friends from 5 to 8 p.m. for a fun evening out. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/eagleartscolorado. Here are a few of the participating businesses and what they will be featuring:

  • Alpaca Yarn Shop
    – Live alpacas, bring your knitting projects for a Knit Night
  • Artspace workshop+gallery
    – Art exhibit and live music
    – Eagle Arts raffle and food drive – bring a canned food item, get a ticket
    – 3 Holiday gift making mini-workshops
  • Bonfire Brewing
    – Happy hour and live music
  • Old Town Hall Gallery – Vail Valley Art Guild
    – New gallery location and exhibition
    – Live music with Jen Mack
  • Owashi Sushi & Kitchen
    – Art exhibit and dinner special
  • Katch of the Day Wine Bar
    – Fundraiser for Zehr Goat Ranch with goats
  • Brush Creek Saloon
    – Dinner specials
  • Everyday Outfitters
    – Live Music, refreshments and art
  • Fusion Hair Salon
    – Art and pottery exhibition
  • Petals of Provence
    – Holiday gift making mini-workshop

Craftsman’s Christmas Market

What’s been known as the Chicken Noodle Soup & Bazaar for years is now the Craftsman’s Christmas Market. Hosted at the Brush Creek Elementary in Eagle, the holiday market and crafts fair will feature hand-made items that are unique to this region. Shoppers will still be able to find their favorite western and vintage items as well as visit the man in the big red suit. Santa will make an appearance in Eagle County, so bring the kids along to this event.

Along with the crafts, the famous home-made chicken noodle soup and pies will be available for purchase to enjoy with friends while you shop or you can even take it home and enjoy it later.  

This holiday fair has been going on for over 40 years and is the main fundraiser for the United Methodist Women of Eagle Valley. The proceeds from this event go directly to helping women and children in our community and throughout the world. Stop by Brush Creek Elementary School from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday.

Veteran’s Day Ceremony

Leading up to Veteran’s Day, which is Monday, the veterans from the Mount of the Holy Cross VFW Post 10721 out of Minturn were busy visiting 19 schools and being part of receptions, assemblies and classroom talks. Kids from all grade levels were able to learn more about what it was like to be on a tour of duty or to serve during a time of peace.

Many of the veterans wore their uniforms or fatigues and brought other items like canteens, technical backpacks and fireproof flight suits to share in the classrooms so the kids could see the gear and learn about what it was like in the jungles of Vietnam during that war or flying a B-52 bomber.

According to Military.com, Veteran’s Day honors veterans who are living or deceased who served honorably in the military during wartime or peacetime. It is sometimes confused with Memorial Day, which honors service members who died during service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle. Veteran’s Day is observed on Nov. 11, which was also known as Armistice Day.

A public Veterans Day ceremony will be held at Freedom Park in Edwards at 4 p.m. on Monday. The guest speaker will be retired US Navy Chaplain Rabbi Joel Newman. The VFW has enlisted the talents of community members to perform on Monday. Nicole Gustafson will sing the “National Anthem”. Gustafson is a former student of Vail Performing Arts Academy, who is currently attending Colorado Mountain College working towards a nursing degree. The 5th-grade classes from Edwards and Avon Elementary Schools will be singing also.

Freedom Park hosts many military-related ceremonies throughout the year. Along the west end of the pond, you will find the Freedom Park Memorial, a 600-pound piece of limestone from the Pentagon’s west wall. The memorial not only commemorates 9/11 but also honors fallen veterans, police and emergency personnel from Eagle County.