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Ski swap, Halloween fun, Loveland opens and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 10/25/19

Ski & Snowboard Club Vail Ski Swap

For 50 years, outdoor enthusiasts have looked forward to the annual Ski & Snowboard Club Vail’s Swap held each fall in Vail. From Oct. 25 to 27, the Dobson Arena is converted into a department store-type of setting with gear like skis, snowboards, boots, poles, helmets, outwear and bindings taking over the entire place.

This is the spot to go if you just moved to town and need equipment in order to participate in outdoor activities this season. It’s also the place to go if your kids have outgrown their jackets and snow pants since last year. If you lost a pair of gloves at the end of the season those can be found here, too. Want to try a new sport? Get geared up at a discount while helping out a good cause.

A percentage of sales from the swap benefit Ski & Snowboard Club Vail, helping the organization fulfill its mission to inspire character growth and excellence in young athletes throughout the Vail community.

New and used gear is up for sale and you never know what you are going to find. There will be helpful and knowledgeable staff and volunteers on hand to answer questions about gear or accessories you are looking for.

Here’s how it works, on Friday there is a $15 admission fee for adults and teenagers from 5 to 7 p.m. Kids 12 and under are free. At 7 p.m. on Friday, the fee drops to $5. Shoppers can also get $5 off admission with a student ID. The venue will close at 10 p.m. The Swap will be open for business from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. There is no entry fee on those days, but keep in mind that the best selection and sizes will be available on Friday. Visit www.vailskiswap.com for more information.

Halloween happenings for kids

Halloween isn’t until next Thursday, but there are many events and activities that will get kids into the spooky spirit this weekend. 

13th annual Halloween lock-in at Gypsum Rec Center

  • Kids get the whole facility for one night and also get a haunted house, costume contest, Halloween movie, swimming, gymnastics and more.
  • Drop off kids by 6 p.m. Friday and pick up by 11:30 p.m. Friday or 8 a.m. on Saturday
  • Kids should bring a sleeping bag, pillow, Halloween costume and swimsuit
  • Boys and girls 5 to 12 years old, tickets are $45
  • www.mountainrec.org

Village Market Pumpkin Fest for Mountain Youth–Riverwalk-Saturday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

  • Trick-or-Treat Street at the various stores, face painting and $5 pumpkins courtesy of Village Market
  • Alpine Arts Center crafts and painting
  • www.mountainyouth.org

Fright at the Museum-Walking Mountains-Saturday 1 to 5 p.m.

  • Pumpkin chuckin’, petting zoo, pop-up corn maze
  • Apple cider demos and tastings, seasonal beer and wines for adults
  • Freaky farm haunted trail, pumpkin patch and carving
  • Learn about compost and freaky food and herbs
  • Snacks will be available
  • Please bring a reusable bottle for water and plan to carpool to the Elk Lot and take the free shuttle to Walking Mountains
  • Tickets are $15 and children 3-years-old and younger are free
  • www.walkingmountains.org

Alpine Arts Center-Halloween arts and crafts

  • Pumpkin carving event on Friday 4 to 7 p.m. Bring a pumpkin and snacks, stencils and tools to carve or paint a pumpkin will be available. The cost is $15 per person and all ages are welcome
  • Drop-in pumpkin carving during Pumpkin Fest on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Cocktails and Canvas guided painting event on Saturday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
  • www.alpineartscenter.org

Beaver Creek Spooktacular – Sunday 4 to 8:30 p.m.

  • Spooky Stroll around Beaver Creek Village and the woods near the base area of Beaver Creek 4 to 6 p.m.
  • Trick or Treating in Beaver Creek Village, games and more 4 to 7 p.m.
  • “Hocus Pocus” movie showing outdoors in Beaver Creek Village 7 to 8:30 p.m.
  • www.beavercreek.com/events

Halloween fun for adults

Kids aren’t the only ones having fun, adults can take part in the Halloween-themed events as well. Here are a few parties going on this weekend:

Maya Day of the Dead – Friday 5 to 10 p.m. 

  • Tickets are $20 in advance and that includes the all-you-can-eat taco bar and one margarita or $25 at the door includes an all-you-can-eat taco bar
  • Costume contest
  • Grateful Dead cover band
  • Pumpkin painting, s’mores station and more
  • Call Maya for tickets: 970-790-5500

Tricks for Treats Parents Night Out–Friday 7 to 9 p.m.

  • Drop the kids off at the Vail Gymnastics Center and go out and enjoy a date night
  • Activities for kids include a haunted house, costume contest, games and movie
  • Pizza will be served to the kids
  • $20 per child, for ages 5 years and older
  • www.vailrec.com

Dramaween- Friday at Route 6 Cafe at 7 p.m. to close

Halloween at the MAC-Mountain Art Collective–Friday from 9 p.m. to close

  • Music by Austin Gavlak and Chris Calderon, visuals by Mtn Man Lasers
  • $10 tickets at the door, $5 drinks, free keg from 9 to 10 p.m.
  • Costume contest
  • Visit Mountain Art Collective’s Facebook page for more info

Minturn Saloon – Saturday 7 p.m. to 1 a.m.

  • Live music by Turntable Review
  • A free Coors Light to the first 100 people
  • $20 donation to the Minturn Community Fund
  • Theme: American horror story
  • Costume contest
  • www.minturncommunityfund.org

Opening day at Loveland Ski Area

We now have not one, not two, but three ski areas to choose from in Colorado. Loveland Ski Area announced earlier this week that opening day will be Friday. Other ski areas that are open include Arapahoe Basin, which opened last Friday and Keystone, which opened last Saturday.

The Chet’s Dream lift will start spinning at 9 a.m. on Friday and will offer access to one full top-to-bottom run. The trails Catwalk, Mambo and Home Run make up this run on opening day, which is over a mile in length and nearly 1,000 vertical feet.

“Our snowmaking team has been working around the clock to get the mountain ready and all of their hard work is about to pay off,” said COO Rob Goodell in a press release. “Mother Nature chipped in with almost a foot of snow during this last storm cycle and that was the boost we needed. Winter is officially here and we can’t wait to celebrate the start of another season.”

Loveland Ski Area will be open seven days a week until early May. Operating hours will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the week and from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the weekends and designated holidays. For more information, visit www.skiloveland.com.

Muscles for Mills fundraiser

Crosstraining Fitness of Vail is hosting an autumn fundraiser on Saturday and this year the proceeds will go toward Noah Mills, a 5-year-old who has been diagnosed with kidney cancer. Typically Crosstraining Fitness of Vail does Barbells for Boobs, a breast cancer fundraiser held annually during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. They switched up the focus this year in order to help the Mills family as they go through this ordeal. Vail Brewing Company is also involved and will provide the beer for the after-party.

Muscles for Mills invites teams consisting of families and friends to come out to participate in the Fun Fitness Challenge. It’s geared toward all fitness levels and ages in order to welcome as many people as possible. Don’t have a team and want to participate? Don’t worry, they will be grouping people together that day to ensure that as many people who want to sweat for a cause can do so.

Noah Mills was recently diagnosed with late-stage bilateral renal (kidney) cancer, called Wilms tumor. The main goal of this fundraiser is to raise money for the Mills family as they go through this difficult time.

The big event happens on Saturday starting at 10:30 a.m. People can register teams for the Fun Fitness Challenge or donate items for the auction here: http://www.cfvcolorado.com/musclesformills2019.html

Avalanche Alumni hockey, Vail Oktoberfest, trail running races and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 9/13/19

Oktoberfest in Vail Village

Oktoberfest returns for its third weekend in the valley with festivities moving to Vail Village, where the Gore Range and the Bavarian-style architecture on Gore Creek Drive provide the perfect backdrop for this annual German holiday. By now you should know the drill: wear lederhosen or a dirndl if you have one, learn the words to “Roll Out the Barrel” and keep moving to the beat as the pace quickens during the chicken dance.

Vail may be miles away from the home of Oktoberfest – Munich, Germany – but the traditions are well represented at the local event.

The traditional blue and white checkered table cloths and flags line the streets and stage and authentic steins are shipped in along with authentic beer. Vail Oktoberfest will be proudly serving Spaten, one of the six breweries allowed to serve during festivities in Munich. Festival guests will enjoy classic Bavarian fare including brats, schnitzel sandwiches, spaetzle, pretzels and more.

The food and drink aren’t the only things that are authentic, the music is as well. Helmut Fricker and the Rhinelanders Band will play several sets throughout the weekend along with the Bavarian Schuhplatters. After the oompah music, Blu Krewe takes the stage on Friday and Boogie Machine will help you dance the night away on Saturday. Both bands play the late set from 7:30-9:30 p.m.

There will be plenty of fun and games at Vail Oktoberfest. Enter the brat eating or stein lifting competitions, try keg bowling or see if your outfit is authentic enough to win top honors in the costume contest. Bring the kids to the Bavarian Kinder Club for games and crafts from 12 to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. For the full schedule of events, please visit www.vailoktoberfest.com.

Avalanche Alumni vs. Vail Yeti Hockey

If you love hockey, casino games and helping out youth sports programs, you’re going to love this weekend. Those three elements could be described as the hat trick that happens off the ice as the Colorado Avalanche Alumni come to town to help raise money for the Vail Mountaineer Hockey Club.

Throughout the weekend, Hockey greats such as Stephane Yelle, Peter Budaj, Cody McLeod, Pierre Turgeon, John-Michael Liles, Rick Barry, even Bernie, the team mascot will be around for meet and greet events, skills clinics, a Casino Night and the Avalanche Alumni will play the Vail Yeti Hockey team. Oh, and did we mention Joe Sakic? Yep, he will be here, too.

Dobson Ice Arena will be transformed into a casino setting for the Top Shelf Casino Night on Friday featuring a DJ, casino tables and a silent auction. Some of the auction items include VIP tickets to “The Voice”; tickets for the “The Bachelorette After the Final Rose” and “Women Tell All”; a VIP experience at Pepsi Center with Jake Schroeder, frequent national anthem singer at Avs games; lots of Avs memorabilia; gift cards to local businesses and more.

On Saturday, youth hockey clinics will be held with some of the Avalanche Alumni between noon and 3 p.m. There will also be a meet and greet with Avalanche Alumni from noon to 2 p.m. at Grey Salt. Grey Salt is a men’s clothing store in Solaris in Vail Village and 20% of proceeds from Grey Salt purchases on Saturday and Sunday will go to the Vail Mountaineer Hockey Club.

The puck drops at 7 p.m. when the Avalanche Alumni take on the Vail Yeti hockey team at Dobson Ice Arena on Saturday night.

It’s going to be an exciting weekend for hockey fans and it’s all for a good cause as the money raised from this event will help the Vail Mountaineer Hockey Club offset about 40% of the fees each year to make the sport accessible to local youth. For more information on the weekend’s schedule and tickets, visit www.vailmountaineers.com

Zusammen Communal Dining

Gather around the table with friends and family in a celebration of food and community at Beaver Creek’s Zusammen celebration on Saturday night. Dine and drink at communal tables on the Plaza at Beaver Creek while enjoying free live music from Spinphony.

Restaurants and small plates include:

  • Golden Eagle Inn: Filet mignon slider with roasted tomato and poblano aioli, chocolate brownie with chilled berry compote.
  • Hooked: Colorado lamb chops with R Farms squash capponata, organic chicken miniature pot pie, zucchini bread with five-spice mascarpone frosting.
  • 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill: Buttermilk-cornmeal battered Rocky Mountain oyster tacos, crunchy slaw, and salsa de chicharron and chicken tinga tacos with crunchy slaw and salsa de chicharron.

Drinks will be available a la carte from the bar on the Plaza level near the ice rink. Guests over 21 years of age can also enjoy a complimentary pour of prosecco in a Beaver Creek-branded flute.

Spinphony is an all-female string quartet band based out of Denver. This group has been wowing fans with its unique arrangements of classical, rock and pop tunes and they absolutely rock. Spinphony has played venues throughout Colorado including Lindsey Vonn’s annual fundraiser at the Four Seasons Vail. They also played on the streets of Vail over Labor Day weekend at the Gourmet on Gore Food Trucks al Fresco event in Vail Village.

Zusammen features open-air seating from 4 to 8 p.m. The pay-as-you-go system allows you to try the different small plates from the restaurants featured. Don’t forget, there is ice skating in the evenings and shopping surrounding the plaza level of Beaver Creek, so make a night of it. For more information, go to www.beavercreek.com.

Habitat for Humanity Diva Build Day

Habitat for Humanity Vail Valley and Thrivent Financial are seeking volunteers for two special Diva Day build events on Friday and Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Habitat’s new Grace Avenue construction site in Gypsum.

Participants may volunteer on either or both of the build days and will be treated to snacks, beverages and a commemorative t-shirt. Suggested build day apparel is pants, hard-soled or closed-toes shoes and layers. No prior construction or home improvement experience is necessary.

On the build days, there will be plenty of ladies clad in pink t-shirts swinging hammers or operating the buzz saw alongside folks from Habitat for Humanity Vail Valley who will be guiding them on how to do all the tasks needed on the job site that day. The volunteers will also be working alongside the family members who will be moving into the house. Habitat requires 250 hours of sweat equity per adult family member. Sweat equity is a central principle in Habitat’s mission of building community and partnering with families to provide a hand up, not a handout.

In addition to the two build days, a Diva Days VIP reception will be held Friday from 5 to 7 p.m. at Hovey & Harrison in Edwards. Complimentary food and beverages will be served and happy hour pricing will be available throughout the event. Habitat will be collecting donations at the door to help fund its local homebuilding program.

To volunteer call Nick Mejia at 970-748-6718 ext. 127 or email volunteer@habitatvailvalley.org. For more information, visit www.habitatvailvalley.org.

MeadowGold 5k and 10k

Now is your chance to participate in the last race of the summer in the Dynafit Vail Trail Running Series. The Meadowgold 5k and 10k races will be this Saturday.

So far, the races have been held in Eagle, Beaver Creek, Camp Hale and on Vail Mountain. This race takes place just outside of Minturn on Meadow Mountain. Runners will ascend technical single track on the beautiful West Grouse Trail. At the high point and nearly halfway through the 10k race, runners will begin the descent to the finish on double track with open views of Vail Mountain and the Gore Range.

The series wraps up with an awards ceremony following the finish of the MeadowGold races at Vail Mountain Coffee & Tea Company in Minturn. All registered racers get a custom tech t-shirt. Word has it that this shirt contains some pretty cool artwork featuring a llama, so that alone might be reason enough to do this race. For more information please visit www.vailrec.com.

Vail Oktoberfest, Eagle River clean up, car shows and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 9/6/19

Oktoberfest in Lionshead

After kicking off Oktoberfest last weekend in Beaver Creek, the annual Bavarian holiday comes east. Vail Oktoberfest will be set up this Friday through Sunday in Lionshead, where the Arrabelle provides the perfect backdrop with its Bavarian-style architecture. 

Festival guests will enjoy classic Bavarian fare including brats, schnitzel sandwiches, spaetzle, pretzels and more. No Oktoberfest celebration would be complete without authentic Oktoberfest beer and Vail Oktoberfest is proud to serve Spaten.

Come for the beer and brats, but stay for the entertainment. Each day offers an array of music from the traditional oompah-style bands like Helmut Fricker and the Rhinlanders Band to ‘80s cover tunes from local band Rewind. 

You’ll also notice that it is all fun and games at Vail Oktoberfest. Enter the brat eating or stein lifting competitions, try keg bowling or see if your outfit is authentic enough to win top honors in the costume contest. Bring the kids to the Bavarian Kinder Club for games and crafts from 12 to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. For the full schedule of events, please visit www.vailoktoberfest.com.

Races in Eagle County

There will be plenty of opportunities to test your mettle against other athletes both up valley and down valley this weekend. Major League Triathlon returns to Avon and the Mountain Rats Trail running races are back in Eagle this weekend. 

Major League Triathlon isn’t just a competition, it’s a show that is spectator friendly where pro triathletes race a mixed-race relay format with abbreviated swimming, biking and running courses before tagging their teammate to race the next leg. But the event isn’t just for the pros, amateurs are welcome to come out and try it as well. There will be everything from the 5k to an IPA run to an Avon Beer Mile run and a splash and dash race for the kids. Bark in the Park allows you to bring your dog along while you run a little over 3 miles in Nottingham Park. 

On Saturday, qualifying rounds will be going on all day with the championships taking place starting at 5 p.m. Locals will get one more chance to see a super-sprint mixed-relay triathlon before the event makes it Olympic debut in Tokyo in 2020.

Live free concerts by The Larry Keel Experience and Trout Steak Revival round out the festival with concerts each night. For more information, go to www.majorleaguetri.com

If trail running is more your thing, the Mountain Rats trail racing event down valley will offer a marathon, a 50k run and a “heavy half”, which is a little longer than the typical half marathon. There is also a 5k held on a relatively flat path that is paved where you can walk, jog, run or race for time. 

All events will start and end in Eagle Ranch. Color Coffee will serve as the kick-off and return point during the races and the after part will be at Boneyard (formerly the Dusty Boot in Eagle Ranch). For a complete schedule and registration information, visit www.geminiadventures.com.

Vail Automotive Classic

If you like cars, you’ll love the opportunities to see some great classics or newer makes and models at this year’s Vail Automotive Classic in Vail.

Each year, the Vail Automotive Classic celebrates the art of the machine with a series of automotive events in the Vail Valley. Their largest event and fundraiser takes place every September and brings car collectors and admirers of all ages out to talk cars and raise a little money for charities.

On Saturday, bring your prized vehicle to Mountain Plaza at Gondola One from 9-11 a.m. for Cars and Coffee. View the vehicles and talk about everything from Bugattis to Bentleys and muscle cars to Maseratis. 

On Sunday, the vintage and new vehicles will be on display in Vail Village from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The marque brand for 2019 is BMW, so expect to see some old and new cars and motorcycles on display. There will be judged categories as well as a people’s choice award, so cast your vote for your favorite vehicle. For more information, call Mark Bergman at 518-232-6544.

Eagle River Cleanup

By donating just three hours of your time, you can help improve the watershed in Eagle County. Saturday marks the 25th annual Eagle River Cleanup, which goes beyond the Eagle River. Nearly 70 miles of banks along the Eagle River, Gore Creek, the upper Colorado River and tributaries are part of this countywide effort. 

The Eagle River Watershed Council organizes the event, which will see over 350 volunteers come out from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. The Eagle River Watershed Council strives to protect and enhance the high-quality natural, scenic and economic values that the rivers and tributaries provide to the citizens, visitors and wildlife of the Eagle River and Colorado River watersheds located in Eagle County.

“The efforts of hundreds of volunteers are very evident throughout the valley after our cleanup events,” said Kate Isaacson with the Eagle River Watershed Council. “A lot of the trash found along our waterways contains plastics or other harmful chemicals which degrade and make their way into our water system.”

As a thank you to all the volunteers, presenting sponsor Vail Resorts Epic Promise will host a barbecue after the clean up from 12 to 2 p.m. at the Broken Arrow Cafe in Arrowhead. There will also be live music with The Runaway Grooms and free beer from Bonfire Brewing. 

Each participant will also get a commemorative t-shirt and the teams are asked to bring in their most interesting piece of trash to the event for a chance to win the Most Unusual Trash Award. To learn more contact the Eagle River Watershed Council at www.erwc.org

First Fridays Art Exhibits 

The Vail Valley Art Guild will showcase the photography of a local high school student as part of its First Friday exhibit and reception series at the Guild’s studio at 291 Main Street in Minturn. 

Celia Barrie, a sophomore at Battle Mountain High School, will exhibit photos taken while on a recent safari in Africa. Accompanied by her Richmond, Virginia, grandparents, Celia traveled to Qatar, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa and viewed a variety of landscapes and wild animals.

The event is free and open to the public on Friday between 5:30 and 8 p.m. and is made possible by the Vail Valley Art Guild’s Outreach program, which provides local venues for young artists and photographers to exhibit their work. The Vail Valley Art Guild also sponsors lectures, field trips and workshops throughout the year. For additional information, visit www.vailvalleyartguild.com.

Also on Friday, check out Gallery 8 Arts in Avon as they showcase the artwork of Shen, the original West Coast graffiti girl at their First Friday event. 

Shen used to call the Vail Valley home and now resides and Texas, but just came from South Dakota where she was painting a mural in a school at the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It’s all part of her new Street Art Evangelism program where Shen goes into areas that are depressed or hurting and strives to bring hope, light and love to those communities through her art. 

Shen is known for her portraits, especially portraits of musicians from pretty much every genre. Welcome Shen back to the Vail Valley at the reception between 4 and 7 p.m. Gallery 8 Arts is located at 150 E. Beaver Creek Blvd., between the UPS Store and Green Elephant Juicery. For more information, go to www.gallery8arts.com.

Traffic in Minturn may be unfortunate, but new Traffic Tokens aim to alleviate headaches

Even though Minturn’s main street under construction this summer, the town’s main street businesses want locals, commuters and guests alike to get “paid back” for any time they may spend waiting in traffic on the road.

The Colorado Department of Transportation is working on freshly paved roads, adding sidewalks and eliminating potholes, which will be great come October when work is complete and driving is smooth and delay-free. But until then, drivers passing on Highway 24 should expect delays in both directions.

To help with any ensuing headaches from Minturn’s summer traffic problem, town businesses are offering guests rewards with “Traffic Tokens.” Guests can collect the coins at participating businesses and redeem them for food, drinks and discounts at restaurants around town.

Tokens can be collected at the Town Hall offices at 302 Pine St., as well as at participating restaurants, Minturn retailers, and at Minturn special events such as the Saturday Market – which runs each Saturday through Sept. 7 – and the Thursday-night Summer Concert Series, starting July 11.  Tokens can then be spent around town at local restaurants, as well as at local businesses.

Offerings and participating business, will be updated throughout the summer, giving locals and returning guests new reasons to #Makeit2Minturn. Updates, reminders, and reward details will be shared via the Town of Minturn’s social media channels, with the handle @GoMinturn.

Extreme Couponing

Here’s a list of deals presenting Traffic Tokens will get at local Minturn businesses:

The Minturn Saloon

Presenting the coin gets guests an appetizer and a 1/2 liter of house margaritas free with the order of 2 entrees.

Vail Mountain Coffee & Tea

The coffeeshop is offering two for one beverages when guests present the tokens.

Thai Kitchen

The restaurant is offering a range of rewards including $3 beers, $5 wine and sake, as well as a free order of spring rolls or pork dumplings with checks totaling $50 or more.

Kirby Cosmo’s

The BBQ bar will give anyone with a token a locals discount on anything across the menu.   

BC Backcountry Wings

Minturn’s wing joint will honor its happy hour prices for a 10pc one-flavor bone-in wing basket and a draft beer any time when presented with a Traffic Token.

Magustos

With an order of a large specialty pizza, token holders will get a free appetizer.

Monkshood Cellars 

Available only during the Saturday Minturn Markets, the wine and cider maker will have a buy 3, get 1 free offer on their products.

Anahata Yoga

Minturn’s newest yoga studio is offering guests and locals a special experience in exchange for the Traffic Token. To any new client with a coin, Anahata is offering an $80 introductory 5 punch pass when they sign up in June. With the punch pass, wellness enthusiasts enjoy $16 classes, a reduction from the standard $20 drop-in fee. Additionally, Anahata is offering, to all students (new and old), 10% off private yoga sessions in exchange for a token.

Equilibrium

Located inside Anahata, the physical therapy studio is offering two sessions for $120. The sessions include a physical therapy evaluation and a follow-up visit that focuses on manual therapy, dry needling, and/or neuromuscular training.

Revival Photographic

Tintype photographer Kevin Banker will be offering 20% off portrait sessions to token holders.

Father’s Day events, farmers markets, fun runs and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 6/14/19

Father’s Day ideas

After celebrating Mother’s Day last month, it’s time to high-five good ol’ dad on Father’s Day this Sunday. According to www.history.com, Father’s Day was inspired by Mother’s Day back in the early 1900s, but it wasn’t deemed a federal holiday until many decades later when President Nixon signed a proclamation in 1972. Rather than getting dad another tie for Father’s Day, check out these different experiences and treat dad this weekend.

Good Eats

  • Maya Mexican Restaurant – On Saturday, bring dad to Maya to taste samplings of brisket, pork shoulder and chicken from their house smoker. Tasty sides will be available as well. Wash it down with free beer from Crazy Mountain Brewery or a 10th Mountain Whiskey Mule for $5. The price is $40 per person with advanced reservations or $50 on the day of the event. Kids age under 12 eat free. Reservations can be made by calling 970-690-5500 or going to www.richardsandoval.com/maya-bc.
  • Game Creek Club – On Sunday morning, bring dad up to 10,000 feet above sea level for brunch. The price is $48 for adults and $28 for kids and that includes the scenic ride up the Eagle Bahn Gondola, complimentary shuttle (or you can hike to and from the location) and a gourmet brunch buffet. Reservations are required. Go to www.gamecreekclub.com for information.
  • Remedy Bar at the Four Seasons Resort Vail – Have an “Old Fashioned” Father’s Day celebration complete with bourbon-molasses glazed pork ribs with sides. Remedy suggests you pair that with a Remedy barrel-select bourbon Old Fashioned cocktail. Available at the Remedy Bar June 14-16.

Daddy’s Girl Tutu 2k

Take dad for a run around Nottingham Lake in Avon on Sunday during the Daddy’s Girl Tutu 2k, a fun run that takes participants around the lake for two laps before coming back to enjoy some snacks. Tutus are mandatory for dads, but dress up the whole family and get some exercise to kick off Father’s Day.

Registration is at the Nottingham Cabin at 9:30 a.m. and the two-kilometer run will begin at 10 a.m. Register in advance through the Avon Recreation Center and pay $5 or day-of registration is available for $10. Tutus will be available for purchase for $20 or make or bring your own. For more information and to register, visit www.avon.org/163/recreation-Center.

Ride the lift

The Eagle Bahn Gondola in Lionshead opened last week and the Centennial Lift at Beaver Creek opens up this Saturday and Sunday and daily operations start on June 21. Some trail closures are still in effect and you may be surprised how much snow is still holding on in the higher elevations. Don’t forget, if you already purchased your Epic Pass for the 2019-2020 ski and snowboard season, you get to ride the lifts this summer for free. For more information, go to www.vail.com and www.beavercreek.com.

Farmers’ Markets

The markets are back in the valley with fresh produce, live music, art and more. The Minturn Market kicks off its 21st season from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturdays through Sept. 7, while Vail hosts its Farmers Market and Art Show from 10 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. on Sundays through Oct. 6.

The Minturn Market is the valley’s original market, and some of the vendors have been showcasing goods there for the past two decades. Minturn is a quaint old railroad town that has its own draw, but really comes alive on Saturdays during the market. The Minturn Market still holds true to its roots and offers plenty of seasonal fresh produce, but has also become more of an artisans’ market. Over 85 vendors offer anything from local wines, clothing to handcrafted toys and wedding gifts.

The kids will love the goat petting zoo and a “build-a-bear” station. Everyone can enjoy live music and vendors serving up breakfast and lunch throughout the event. For more information, visit www.minturnmarket.org.

What started out 18 years ago as a small market with a few tents on East Meadow Drive, the Vail Market and Art Show has grown into the largest farmers market in the Vail Valley. The Vail Farmers Market and Art Show now has over 135 vendor tents showcasing products from Colorado and beyond. Find fabulous fresh produce from around the region, but also check out everything from USDA-certified meats to photography to housewares.

You can buy everything you need to have a fresh dining experience at home, or you can let the professionals take care of the details at the Farm to Table dinners held throughout the summer. These dinners will be held rain or shine and you are seated right on East Meadow Drive. Each dinner will be paired with a wine and beer partner from the Taste of Vail.

The Vail Market and Art Show also almost acts as a second home for the Vail Jazz Festival. The Vail Jazz Festival hosts musicians from noon to 3 p.m. June 30 through Aug. 25. For more information about the Vail Farmers Market and Art Show, go to www.vailfarmersmarket.com.

King of the Mountain Volleyball tournament

You may not think Vail and beach volleyball go together, but for 47 years, the King of the Mountain Volleyball Tournament has been offering divisions of play for junior boys and girls, masters/seniors divisions and co-ed divisions.

The tournament has become a Father’s Day tradition since it has been held over Father’s Day weekend for the last 19 years. Each year they host special father/son and father/daughter divisions on Father’s Day.

In addition to the division play, there is also a free juniors’ beach volleyball clinic on Friday. One of USA Volleyball’s greatest coaches and mentors, John Kessel, will be directing the clinic. Kessel was recently inducted into the USAV Hall of Fame and was the recipient of USAV’s highest award, the Frier Award, earlier this spring.

One of the country’s oldest volleyball events returns to Vail Friday-Sunday. Watch the best players in the region compete or take part in the event. For more information, please visit www.kingofthemountainvolleyball.com.

Tabor Opera House shows

2018 was a very successful year for the Tabor Opera House in Leadville. Once known as the “finest opera house west of the Mississippi,” the structure was about to face extinction. The Tabor Opera House Preservation Foundation has worked hard to secure funds to help preserve this historic landmark, which was built by Horace Tabor, one of the most well known silver mining kings in the West, in 1879.

Oscar Wilde, Harry Houdini, John Philip Sousa, and Buffalo Bill were among the famous entertainers and speakers who performed at the Tabor Opera House back in its heyday. The opera house has been used continuously since it was built in 1879.

This weekend kicks off the calendar of summer events with bluegrass quartet, Chatham County Line and American singer-songwriter and storyteller, John Craigie on Friday night. The Central City Opera performs “En Mis Palabras/In My Own Words” on Saturday night.

Chatham County Line describes themselves as “an Americana band without drums, or a rock and roll band that doesn’t plug anything in.” Be prepared for three- and four-part harmonies along with banjo, mandolin, fiddle, piano, steel pedal and bass.

John Craigie is known for his humorous storytelling and serious folk music. The Portland, Oregon native has recently collaborated with Gregory Alan Isakov on his fifth album, “No Rain, No Roses” and was asked by Jack Johnson to be a part of his summer 2017 tour.

An original one-act opera, “En Mis Palabras/In My Own Words” follows the universal theme of adolescents trying to find their own voice and learning who they are amid parental expectations and peer influences.

Help support a historical landmark by attending these shows. For more information, visit www.taboroperahouse.net.

Bindu Memorial Run

On Saturday morning in Minturn, the inaugural Bindu Memorial Run will be held to honor a beloved teacher, Bindu Sky Pomeroy, who died in a backcountry snowboarding accident this past winter. The Bindu Memorial Run offers a 5k run as well as a 5k walk and is the senior project of recent graduate, Caroline Jones.

Jones had taken a few history classes from Pomeroy throughout the years at the Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy (VSSA). She also took mindfulness classes where Pomeroy would teach meditation, yoga and rock stacking on the river.  

“He taught me to find inner peace with myself as well as something called ‘Live Aloha’,” Jones said. “’Live Aloha’ isn’t just a greeting in Hawaii, it means that by having kind, patient, sympathetic, loving actions we can individually and collectively improve our community.”

Proceeds from the event will go to the Bindu Sky Memorial Fund, which will help fund future mindfulness classes at VSSA, help build a memorial in his honor and help fund the Bindu Spirit Award and scholarship, which will be awarded to an athlete who shares Bindu’s spirit.

“He was full of passion and love for the mountains, snowboarding, mindfulness, and especially his students,” Jones said. “Bindu touched the lives of each person he came across and will be forever missed.”

The cost is $26 for adults and $16 for students. The cost will increase by $10 on the day of the event. Online registration closes at midnight on Friday. Day-of registration begins at 9 a.m. on Saturday with the 5k run at starting 10:30 a.m. and the walk at 10:35 a.m. For more details, go to www.bspmemorial.com/bindumemorialrun.

Kevin Banker’s old-timey photographs and new studio bring a slice of historic art to Main Street Minturn

It took Kevin Banker two years to refine tintype photography, and now he’s a bona fide Vail Valley Instagram celebrity with his haunting, 19th century-style portraits.

Banker recently opened Revival Photographic, an old-timey portrait studio in the old Battle Mountain Trading Post off Main Street in downtown Minturn. In an age of instantaneous and ubiquitous photography — thanks to improved phone camera technology — tintype photography and the new studio give Banker the opportunity to focus on the basic principles of the art form he’s loved for more than 20 years. He likes making art with more depth than a few social media likes.

“It’s a keepsake. It’s not a digital photograph that will get tossed out, or sit on your computer or your phone that you’ll never post. This is a wall hang,” he said.

Kevin Banker, who’s been a professional photographer for 16 years, said he’s watched the medium change drastically over the past 10 years. That’s why he wanted to open up his studio — an iPhone can’t truly capture what a large format camera can.
Special to the Daily

Tintype photography — images printed on thin slates of metal — gained popularity in the 1860s and 1870s as an improvement on early photographic processes. The first commercial photographs, daguerrotypes, were images printed on silvered copper plate. Long exposure times required subjects to sit completely still for upwards of 60 seconds. But with the improved tintype technology, subjects didn’t have to sit for quite so long, and the photographer could have the image developed and ready for the subject in 10 to 15 minutes.

Tintypes also cost much less than daguerrotypes, making photography a more accessible hobby. They are sometimes referred to as wet plates because the images are created using the wet plate collodion chemical process. Banker’s subjects get to watch the very end of the developing process, when he washes off the developer and the negative image turns into a positive.

“That’s the magic right there,” he said.

Part of what inspired Banker to pursue tintype photography was the back-to-basics approach. Banker has also worked as a freelance photographer and videographer for 16 years, shooting architecture, editorial and advertisements for clients across the country and the world. With digital photography, he sometimes felt caught up in digital-age immediacy.

“As I became a photographer, everyone wanted everything so fast,” Banker said. “And this really brought me back to the patience and craft of making a photo again, rather than just shooting a digital image.”

At first, he practiced developing wet plates in the apartment where he and his girlfriend live. But when his chemicals took over their apartment, he realized he needed real studio space.

The old Battle Mountain Trading Post, built in 1946, used to be a curio shop owned by Bill Reis. He had put the building up for sale, and a real estate company was interested in buying the property, tearing down the historic building and putting up condos. Reis decided to put it up for rent instead, but most potential buyers wanted to do significant remodeling that would remove original features like the wood-paneled walls and the stately log countertop.

Banker approached Reis and said all he wanted to do was paint the two garage bays white, add a darkroom in the back, and leave the rest as-is. Reis drafted a lease, Banker signed it, and got to work on his passion project. He was the first person that Banker photographed in his new space.

He bought the large, collapsible-aperture tintype camera from Chamonix, a company that still makes large-format cameras. The lens he uses is a French Darlot Petzval Portrait from 1880, and would have been actually used by 19th century photographers. He set up full strobe lighting, which allows subjects to sit for less time than they would normally have to in a tintype session. Thanks to the window-paned garage doors, Banker also has the ability to shoot with daylight.

Aside from the portrait studio, Banker wants to use Revival Photographic to create a Minturn arts district. He wants to turn the second garage bay into a collaborative arts space where local artists can come and work with other creatives. He plans on offering continuing-education art classes. He’s working with the town of Minturn to get a beer and wine license to host happy hours and events for guests — locals, tourists, campers and bikers — to hang out and chill. He’s planning on building a patio outside and turning the old wooden counter into a bar.

“One, I have parking, and that’s really hard,” he joked. “We can get a decent amount of people in here so we could actually have a good showing.”

Portraits at Revival Photographic come in tiered pricing options, based on what size prints he’s developing for clients. Three 4-by-5 prints go for $200, three 5-by-7s go for $350 and one 8-by-10 goes for $500. He also offers â la carte and specialty sessions, like boudoir or maternity shoots. Coming soon, he’ll offer ambrotypes — photos printed on glass — which come with a base 16-by-20 print, with additional add-ons. He also wants to sell 11-by-14 metal plates in the near future.

This is how the wet plate collodion process works

  • First, collodion is poured over the metal plate in the darkroom.
  • The plate is then transferred to a silver nitrate bath, where it sits for three minutes. The silver nitrate reacting with the collodion makes the plate light-sensitive.
  • The photographer brings the metal plate out to the studio and takes the photo.
  • Then, the plate is brought back into the darkroom, where it sits in developer chemicals for 10-15 seconds.
  • The plate gets a quick water bath to wash off the developer before going into the fixer and becoming a positive image.

Entertainment Editor Casey Russell can be reached at crussell@vaildaily.com.

Minturn’s newest yoga studio is gearing up for a summer of mind and body wellness

Chelsea Winters’ new yoga studio in Minturn, Anahata Yoga, is bringing mind-body-soul yoga to the Vail Valley. With a grand opening party slated for June 22, she hopes to inspire yogis of all skill levels to practice in the inviting, positive space on Main Street in Minturn.

“I wanted to create something that was grounded and earthy and yogic,” she said of her space. “It’s nice to have my own little center.”

Since its soft opening on May 24, Anahata has offered several workshops in addition to regularly scheduled classes, including a Gentlemen’s Only Hour and a New Moon Restorative and Reiki class. Winters plans to offer the New Moon Reiki sessions each month as the lunar cycle restarts. Reiki’s energetic healing properties, Winters said, fit in nicely with the new moon and getting a fresh start.

The Anahata Yoga space, located on Main Street in Minturn
Chelsea Winters wanted to create an earthy, yogic feel to her studio. Anahata Yoga is located on Main Street in Minturn.
Jon Resnick | Special to the Daily

In addition to classes and workshops, Anahata also offers private physical therapy sessions with Carrie Eckenhoff and massage therapy with Eileen Lindbuchler. When the idea for her own studio struck Winters in March of this year, she asked Eckenhoff and Lindbuchler to join her. It would be the perfect way to build a place focused on mental and physical wellness, and three entrepreneurial women.

Winters has worked professionally and personally with Eckenhoff and Lindbuchler, so by opening Anahata, she wanted to fit a niche she feels Minturn has been lacking.

“We are each collaborating as well as working as individuals. Three strong, entrepreneurial women taking the leap of faith to create something more than ‘just another yoga studio’ but more a place of profound healing: mentally, spiritually, emotionally and physically,” she said.

Winters began searching around for leases, and when she found her current space, she signed immediately. And, bonus points, it was a new moon. She kept an ornate chandelier that was already in the space and outfitted the back end with private rooms for Eckenhoff and Lindbuchler. She finished it off with top-of-the-line yoga props, yoga-themed décor and merch from other local artisans and businesses.

Chelsea Winters smiling in her studio
Chelsea Winters first discovered yoga while attending college at the University of New Hampshire. She’s been teaching for seven years.
Jon Resnick | Special to the Daily

Winters has lived in the valley for years. She’s been practicing for 17 years, since discovering its physical benefits in college, and she’s been teaching in the area for seven years. Her style combines vinyasa krama, restorative, and kundalini, all with a deep focus on breathing techniques.

The grand opening party on Saturday, June 22, at 5:30 p.m. will include a free, 60-minute practice led by Winters, followed by music from DJ Nevada Lee Furrow. Winters, Eckenhoff and Lindbuchler will be around to answer questions, and guests can drink Vail Brewing Co.’s Hot Mess Blondes and enter a raffle. The studio is small and mat space is limited, so Winters suggests sending an RSVP online in advance.

Winters works hands-on with students who come to her classes, offering physical adjustments to make sure no one gets hurt.
Jon Resnick | Special to the Daily

Get your flow on

In addition to twice-a-month workshops, Anahata Yoga will offer a regular schedule of something-for-everyone classes all summer long. Here’s the lineup.

Mondays

  • 7:30–8:30 a.m. Solar Flow
  • 5:45–6:45 p.m. Solar Flow

Tuesdays

  • 8-9 a.m. Solar Flow
  • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Fireside Restorative

Wednesdays

  • 7:30–8:30 a.m. Foundation Flow
  • 9-10 a.m. Solar Flow
  • 7:15–8:15 p.m. Solar Flow

Thursdays

  • 8-9: a.m. Solar Flow
  • 4:30–5:30 p.m. Lunar Flow

Fridays

  • 7:30– 8:30 a.m. Solar Flow
  • 9-10 a.m. Foundation Flow

Saturdays

  • 9-10:15 a.m. Solar Flow
  • 11 a.m. to noon Lunar Flow

Sundays

  • 9-10:15 a.m. Solar Flow

Barstool racing in Minturn is grassroots, community fun; returns March 9

Each barstool sled must consist of a stool being mounted on two skis.

The rules are simple: Strap a barstool to a pair of skis and ride it down a hill.

The Minturn barstool races will return on Saturday to raise money for the Minturn Community Fund, which contributes to the town’s summer concert series, among other things.

Each year, teams gather in Minturn — this year, near Little Beach Park — to race down a hill on, as the name suggests, a barstool.

One such team — made up of Patty Bidez, Kory Headly, Phoenix Patterson and Spencer Whitlock — has been at work preparing to defend its reigning first-place title.

“We mostly made it out of scraps we had lying around,” said Whitlock, the self-dubbed “winningest ‘NASBAR’ racer in history,” of his team’s creation. The barstool was purchased for about $15, and the skis were found in a trash can. The team estimated that less than $50 is spent on the creation.

It’s all in a name

In addition to “strapping a stool to a pair of skis,” as Earle Bidez, Minturn Community Fund board member, refers to it,

Spencer Whitlock will represent Where Did You Get Those Coconuts? on Saturday, March 9, in Minturn.

teams decorate their sleds. This year, Patty Bidez and company is going by “Where Did You Get Those Coconuts?” — but aside from the team name, they’re keeping everything else a secret.

While their stool has yet to be decorated, the infrastructure is in place, and the skis have firmly been attached to the stool using only minor tools, a process that took only 30 minutes.

“Thirty minutes with a six-pack, an hour and a half without,” Whitlock joked.

The event is split into two competitions: the barstool race (judged on speed) and the race known as “Anything Goes,” which judges racers on their “style” and “panache.”

Anything Goes allows riders to race down the hill on … anything. As long as it slides, it counts, and there’s no limit to the number of riders.

Each team also must prepare a pit crew to put the sled back together if it suffers a crash.

Not only is Where Did You Get Those Coconuts? the reigning champ, but its members are feeling confident about this year’s festivities.

The reigning champs

“I feel bad for everyone else, but I think we have a good chance of winning,” Whitlock said. “It’ll basically be a fight for second.”

Where’d You Get Those Coconuts? built their sled in their shop at Custom Audio Video in Minturn, a space that Whitlock noted is perfect for the occasion.

The sleds are often made with cheap materials such as recycled skis.

“It’s full of crap, just like the day we made (the sled),” he said.

Regardless of where the sleds are made and who wins the races, Earl noted that it’s all in good fun and that raising money for the Minturn Community Fund is a good cause. However, he noted that he’s looking forward to the “Apres Stool Celebration,” which will feature the award ceremony and drinks at the Minturn Saloon on Main Street.

 

Fits like a glove

“Barstool Races are perfect for Minturn,” said Cindy Krieg, with the town of Minturn. “Our community prides itself on its authenticity. There is nothing pretentious about Minturn, and we like our events to match that quality. Grassroots, down to earth and community focused — that’s how I would describe most of our events.”

To register a team, visit www.minturncommunityfund.org. A registration fee of $50 is required, and registrations will not be complete until payment is received. Checks can be dropped off at the Minturn Town Hall or mailed to the town of Minturn at PO Box 309, Minturn, CO, 81645.

Arts & Entertainment Editor Nate Day can be reached at nday@vaildaily.com or 970-748-2932.

Vail Adventure photographer Jon Sheppard hosting a show in Minturn

VAIL — Jon Sheppard’s life looks like an adventure novel, except it’s not fiction. Sheppard has lived it.

You can see for yourself. His photos, award-winning books, stories and photography are the centerpiece of a show at Vail Mountain Coffee & Tea in Minturn, Friday, Feb. 1.

Action And adventure

Sheppard’s life reads like an action and adventure book.

He was a Navy kid for whom travel was commonplace. Among other places, he lived on Kodiak Island in Alaska. A Kodiak bear is as big as you think it is, he said.

As a young man, he lived in the West Indies where he was in the boat charter and scuba diving business. That’s where he began his underwater photography and film work.

“Diving for sunken treasure, spearfishing and exploring the jungles was a daily routine,” Sheppard said.

That’s also where he dove headlong into underwater photography and scenic landscapes.

For what seemed like good reasons at the time, he migrated to Tennessee where he shared his skills for rock climbing and opened his own climbing school. He also delighted in the challenges of whitewater rafting and kayaking.

Terra firma, of course, was never enough, which explains why he became an avid skydiver. His highest jump was from 20,000 feet.

High life and High Country

Back on the ground in Tennessee, he played drums in country music bands. He was also a TV cameraman and videographer, working many years in the television production industry and making music videos.

Now, Sheppard calls the Colorado high country his home, moving to Vail in 1989. When he’s not home — and he often isn’t — he’s photographing the scenic beauty all around us.

He was also introduced to skiing, and figured that anything worth doing is worth overdoing.

For fun, he and two friends — one of them blind — set a world record by skiing 18 Colorado ski areas in one day, while raising more than $20,000 for the U.S. Disabled Ski Team. Helicopters and vehicles proceeding at well above the posted speed limit were involved.

In the 1990s, he started showing his photographs to his friends, who encouraged him to publish photography books.

It seemed like another adventure, so in the late ‘90s he came out with three award-winning photo books. John Fielder did his foreword on his very first book. Sheppard is currently working on two more book projects.

Staff Writer Randy Wyrick can be reached at 970-748-2935 and rwyrick@vaildaily.com.