| VailDaily.com

Painting a full moon, a food drive, 10 years of beers and more: Tricia’s weekend picks 11/6/20

Cocktails and Canvas

If you’re not watching the big Clemson-Notre Dame football game on Saturday night, maybe Cocktails and Canvas is more your thing at Alpine Arts Center. Even if you don’t fancy yourself as an artist, you can still create something and you may even amaze yourself.

This week’s art project lets painters create a moonlit scene with a mountain backdrop. An Alpine Arts Center instructor will guide you through a step-by-step process on how to paint the full moon, stars, evergreen trees and a lake with a reflection on it.

Advance registration is required and you can do this from the comfort of your own home or in the studio. Visit alpineartscenter.org for options on how to register for an in-person class, which is $45 per person, or a virtual class. If you’d like to attend virtually through Zoom please select that option for $25. It excludes materials but class kits available for purchase online.

Saturday’s class starts at 6:30 p.m. and goes for about two hours. Beer and wine are available at Alpine Arts Center’s bar for $6. Soft drinks are available for purchase, too.

Congratulations to Alpine Arts Center for earning the gold medal for Best Art Gallery in the Vail Daily’s Best of the Vail Valley contest for 2020. View the entire list of top spots here.

Bonfire Brewing’s 10th Anniversary Party

Bonfire Brewing in Eagle turns 10 years old this weekend! To celebrate, this popular brewery is hosting a weeklong celebration with retro beer styles re-released to the public along with a commemorative pint glass, brewery tours, live music and more.

Stop by on Sunday to get your hands on a limited-edition pint glass that Bonfire Brewing is deeming a “Decade of Pints.” The artwork depicts the exterior of Bonfire Brewing’s location on Second Street in Eagle and shows the number of pints sold throughout the past decade.

Bonfire Brewing will be conducting tours of its production facility on November 12. Pre-register for the tours in advance as space is limited to four to 10 people per tour due to social distancing guidelines. Tours are free and are 45 minutes long.

Congratulations to Bonfire Brewing for earning the silver medal in the “Best Happy Hour” and “Best Brewery” categories as well as bronze in the “Best Patio” category in the Vail Daily’s Best of the Vail Valley contest for 2020.

Bonfire Brewing has decided to celebrate the occasion with a week full of events:

  • Sunday – Commemorative Glass Release, Chalkboard Art Revealed
  • Monday – Throwback Beer Release #1
  • Tuesday – Guess Your Flight Night and Throwback Beer Release #2
  • Wednesday – Specialty Slush Release #1
  • Thursday – Chambers Brew Tours and Throwback Beer Release #3 and Live Music: Lance Boyle and the Red Bottom Boys 6-9 p.m.
  • Friday – Throwback Beer Release #4, Specialty Slush Release #2 and Live Music: The Evolution from 6-9 p.m.
  • Saturday – Final Hurrah – Mug Club Auction, Prize Drawing, No. 10 Bottle Release and Live Music: Hardscrabble from 6-9 p.m.

For more information visit Bonfire Brewing’s website at bonfirebrewing.com and follow its social media accounts.

Giving with the Grooms Food Drive

In a few weeks, many families will be feasting on turkey and all the fixings during the Thanksgiving meal. But while many don’t feel the strife of food insecurity, it is a problem in the Vail Valley. To help get food into the hands of those in need, rock band The Runaway Grooms have stepped up to host a food drive.

Throughout the month of November, The Runaway Grooms is hosting “Giving with the Grooms” at various locations up and down the valley. Donate non-perishable goods or City Market gift cards at any of the drop-off sites. All donations will benefit the Vail Valley Salvation Army Food Pantry.

The Vail Valley Food Pantry has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, with many more households needing assistance. According to the Vail Valley Salvation Army’s website, non-perishable food and hygiene items are needed. Non-perishable food items include canned soups, peanut butter, pasta and rice, canned vegetables, dried fruit, nuts and cereal. Hygiene items include soap, shampoo, toothpaste, lotion and toilet paper.

Drop off locations:

  • Bonfire Brewing
  • Vail Brewing Company – Eagle-Vail
  • Vail Brewing Company – Vail Village
  • Riverwalk Theater
  • Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy

The Runaway Grooms is hosting this food drive until the end of November. For more information, go to therunawaygrooms.com.

Colorado Snowsports Museum

Unlike other ski towns that were mining operations first, Vail was created because of the ski area. Vail started spinning its lifts for the public in December of 1962 and the town was erected around the slopes and was incorporated in 1966. This short yet impressive history is brought to life with the Colorado Snowsports Museum. The museum also houses artifacts and much more about the history of skiing in Colorado. 

Vail’s history has a lot to do with its past. Just south of Vail is Camp Hale. At one point, up to 14,000 soldiers were stationed there training with the 10th Mountain Division, the winter warfare unit of the U. S. Army during World War II. The Colorado Snowsports Museum has a full exhibit dedicated to the stories of the men of the 10th, complete with a movie called “Climb to Glory” that shares stories from that era, vintage footage from Camp Hale and the battles in Europe.

When the men of the 10th returned home after the war, many of them went into the fledgling outdoor ski industry as we know it today. One of the founders of Vail, Pete Seibert, was in the 10th Mountain Division.

In addition to information about the 10th Mountain Division, the Colorado Snowsports Museum houses Olympic memorabilia, the evolution of ski equipment, lost ski areas, the history of snowboarding and the Hall of Fame.

The Colorado Ski Museum’s Snowsports Hall of Fame includes an interactive touchscreen monitor display of information on the movers and shakers in the winter sports industry of Colorado. Each year, Hall of Fame candidates are nominated under the established criteria of Athlete, Sport Builder, Inspirational or Pioneer categories, with the Hall of Fame Nomination Committee evaluating and confirming the nominees to move onto the final ballot.

Join the Colorado Snowsports Museum on Tuesdays and Thursdays for a 60-minute Walking Tour in Vail. During the tour, the guide will relay how Vail became the town and resort it is today. The tour information dates back to when Vail was a remote area, accessed only by the Ute American Indians as a summer residence. The land around Vail was part of the Gold Rush and became home to ranchers and eventually became America’s number one ski resort. Learn the story of Vail and share it with others time and time again after you take this tour.

To join a tour, call (970) 476-1876 to make a reservation. Then, meet at the Colorado Snowsports Museum just before 11 a.m. to start the tour. Masks and proper social distancing are required on tours and in the Museum. Have a larger group? Private tours can be arranged outside of the Museum’s regular schedule. The Colorado Snowsports Museum’s hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. For more information, view the website at snowsportsmuseum.org.

Shakedown Bar Vail is taking music to the streets

The COVID-19 restrictions have made it difficult for some businesses and professions to re-open and get back to work. Scott Rednor, owner and musician at Shakedown Bar in Vail and Shakedown Presents, felt the sting of the restrictions. Shakedown Bar at the top of Bridge Street had been closed since March 12. Warmer weather and the urge to play gave Rednor a few ideas on just how he could reach others through music this summer.

“I don’t think any of our family of musicians had gone three to four months without playing since we all began our journeys in music,” Rednor said, referring to the long list of talent he performs with. “We started playing at the entrance at Shakedown where we served drinks to on-lookers and played some tunes.”

After a couple of weeks, small crowds started to gather. In addition to enjoying live music in the street, the listeners also became shoppers and diners at area retailers and restaurants.  

“We noticed how well all the businesses around us were doing during our five-hour performances and took it to the town of Vail to see if they’d assist us in covering the costs,” Rednor said.

That initial talk with the town of Vail eventually became a contract where Shakedown Presents would do the business activations, pop-up street performances in Lionshead and Vail Village as well as the concerts at the Lower Bench at Ford Park. Rednor has an extensive list of talented musicians that he could draw from and all of them were excited to work.

“Our roster of artists has been put to work and they couldn’t be happier to play their music to the crowds in Vail who appreciate the fun atmosphere we create at each event,” Rednor said.

“Through our hard work over the past eight years at Shakedown, we have established relationships with the best players locally and regionally. The high level of experience for the artists and listeners has helped to grow this exponentially,” Rednor said.

The live music that has drawn in listeners has been a plus all around. From the unexpected reactions from passers-by who stop and sit and take a listen while sipping a to-go cocktail to the businesses in the area of the music that benefitted, it was a win-win for everyone. 

“We were treated so well by all the businesses in the area of the concerts. They were all very thankful for our innovation and efforts to boost their businesses. Retail and food and beverage alike seemed to benefit from it,” Rednor said. “Lionshead has been busier than I’ve ever seen and a special shout out to Bart and Yeti’s for taking such great care of the bands and crews.” 

In addition to helping the community, Rednor’s talented and innovative group was also able to take care of their own. Shakedown Presents produced a charity event in October for a long-time musician and friend, Todd Smallie, who’d lost his teenage son, Ethan, this summer. The event raised $40,000 for mental health services.

“We are a family that will do whatever it takes to support one another, especially during something as sad as this,” Rednor said. “The Vail Mind Center was a really great partner for this as well, providing therapists on-site to show our community that resources are available locally.”

That sense of community can be felt by watching a video posted on Shakedown Bar’s Facebook page as the musicians gathered on stage to sing an emotional version of “Will the Circle be Unbroken” during the fundraiser.

What’s on tap for this winter? Shakedown Presents has proposed shows in Vail Village and Lionshead every weekend throughout the ski season and next summer. This Saturday Shakedown Presents will host “2 Villages, 6 bands: A Halloween Family Jam” from 1 to 6 p.m.

“We have the resources to create a great street vibe to help our town handle the lack of inside space that will be available. The town seems very supportive and we’ll know more in a couple of weeks,” Rednor said. “We are ready to rock as often as they’ll have us!”

Costumes, games, movies, live music and plenty of candy can be found this Halloween: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 10/30/20

Halloween Happenings

As you can guess, Halloween looks a little different this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Although some events have been canceled, most have been altered to allow some traditional fun for kids and adults alike. Please check out each event’s website for COVID-19-compliant regulations that will be put in place. The forecast at press time called for clear skies and temperatures in the 50s during the day and 20s at night, so dress appropriately to allow for layers underneath the costume. Here’s a few things happening Friday and Saturday:

Mountain Youth’s Valley Voices Teen Halloween – Trinity Church – Friday 8 to midnight

High schoolers can still take part in Halloween activities by dressing up and heading over to Trinity Church in Edwards from 8 p.m. until midnight on Friday. Throughout the night teens can enjoy decorating facemasks to match costumes, tons of Halloween candy and two movies: “Beetle Juice” and “A Quiet Place” along with popcorn. There will be some great photo ops for selfies. Learn more at valleyvoice.org.

Trick or Treat Street – Eagle Ranch Village – Friday and Saturday – 4 to 7:30 p.m.

Eagle Ranch Village will be hosting its annual Trick or Treat Street this year, but to encourage social distancing, kids will be sent on a hunt for photo stops around Eagle Ranch Village. Costumes are encouraged and masks are required. The event has been spread out over four days (it started on Wednesday) to allow guests to space out. and choose which date they’d like to attend. Kids can travel to these businesses between 4 and 7:30 p.m. and look for the designated photo stops around the village. Once the photo stops are found, kids are asked to take a photo and post it on Facebook or Instagram and tag the business and #eagleranchtrickortreat. Prizes will be awarded and look for dinner and drink specials while you are out. For more information, visit Eagle Ranch Village’s Facebook page. At press time, this was the list of participating businesses:

Endorphin
Zealous Schools
Slifer Smith & Frampton *stop in for a treat
Yoga Off Broadway
Knapp Ranch *Stop in for a treat
Berkshire Hathaway

Trick or Treat Trot by Vail Rec District – Vail and Lionshead – Saturday – 2 to 5 p.m.

The longest-running event for Halloween this weekend is the 28th annual Trick or Treat Trot put on by the Vail Recreation District. Park for free in either the Vail Village or Lionshead Village parking structures and check-in at booths at either village to start your candy-gathering journey. There will be lists of participating businesses given out at the booths. The Vail Recreation District recommends this event for infants through 10-year-olds and their families. This is a great time for everyone to show off the costumes and roam around pedestrian villages while stopping at various businesses for candy. Join in the fun on Saturday from 2 to 5 p.m. For more information, visit vailrec.com.

Halloween on Broadway – Eagle – Saturday – 4 to 9 p.m.

Historic downtown Eagle will also be a place to go for Halloween fun on Saturday between 4 and 9 p.m. Area businesses will be handing out candy in addition to some fun and games, food trucks, live music shopping and more. For information, check out downtowneagle.org.

Halloween Family Jam 

Scott Rednor, owner of Shakedown Bar Vail, and his collection of talented musicians have been livening up the streets of Vail and Lionshead this summer with their pop up concert series and their larger shows at the Lower Bench at Ford Park. Rednor, a family man himself with two young daughters, decided to put together one more show during the day on Halloween.

What’s been dubbed as “2 Villages/6 Bands: A Halloween Family Jam” by Shakedown Presents and the town of Vail will entertain those families enjoying the 28th annual Trick or Treat Trot in Lionshead and Vail Village, as well as those who have been following the Shakedown Presents series and even passers-by who stumble upon the music.

The free Halloween Family Jam band will feature members of the Shakedown Family Band including Brian Loftus, Eddie Roberts, Michael Jude, John Michel, Mark Levy, Kramer Kelling, Shawn Eckels, Rob Eaton, Jr., Dan Africano, Scott Rednor, Kory Montgomery and Nicholas Gerlach. The concerts will be held in unison and the Children’s Fountain location will include a Halloween-themed photo set and complimentary photographer. For more information visit shakedownpresents.com.

Children’s Fountain in Vail Village:
  • Turntable Revue 1 – 2:25 p.m.
  • Brothers Keeper 2:45 – 4:10 p.m.
  • A Spooky Talking Heads Celebration 4:30 – 6 p.m.
Lionshead Stage
  • Pauli G & The Alien Love Monkees 1 – 2 p.m.
  • Kory Montgomery Band 2:20 – 4:10 p.m.
  • Eddie Roberts and Friends 4:30 – 6 p.m.

Halloween activities, a ski swap, coat drive & more: Tricia’s weekend picks

Ski & Snowboard Club Vail Swap

It’s time for the 51st annual Ski & Snowboard Vail Swap at the Dobson Ice Arena. The Swap almost didn’t happen this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Ski & Snowboard Club Vail was worried about trying to pull it off with all the social distancing and public safety measures put into place. With all of its staff and volunteers, it seemed unlikely the nonprofit could host it. Then Ski Pro, one of the vendors that has worked the event for years, stepped up to the plate and offered its assistance in hosting the event.

Things will look different at the swap. First of all, only 100 people will be allowed at a time into Dobson Ice Arena and that includes those working the event. Tickets are free but you must register to select your time at Eventbrite. At press time, tickets were available for one-hour time slots on Friday between 7 and 8 p.m., Saturday between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. and Sunday between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Eventbrite ticket holders have priority entry, but tickets are not required. 

The Ski & Snowboard Club Vail Swap is a great place to pick up new or gently used skis, snowboards, boots, bindings and all the accessories like helmets, poles and clothing for the upcoming ski season. All sales are final and all major credit cards are accepted. A portion of the proceeds will go to Ski & Snowboard Club Vail. To learn more about the event, go to vailskiswap.org. To learn more about Ski & Snowboard Club Vail visit skiclubvail.org.

Halloween arts and crafts

Get into the Halloween spirit by doing some arts and crafts around a Halloween theme with the help of Alpine Arts Center in Edwards. Alpine Arts Center will host pumpkin carving and skull pumpkin painting classes next Wednesday and Thursday. In the meantime, Alpine Arts Center has to-go art kits.

Grab some paint supplies to do some fun crafts or be amazed at what you’ll find in one of their mystery bags. To-go pottery painting kits are also available. Just pick out your mug or other pottery piece from shelves upon shelves of choices and pick out paint colors, follow the instructions and you’ve got a fun Halloween piece just in time for the holiday weekend.

You can also do less-traditional items like dream catchers and other fun projects. Stop by Alpine Arts Center for ideas as they are an art supply store as well as an instruction center.

It may not be Halloween-themed, but Cocktails and Clay is happening this Saturday at 6:30 p.m. The class is about two hours in length and it is lead by an instructor from the Alpine Arts Center. Make a cool vase or mug with your own special flair. Do an in-person class or via Zoom. If doing Zoom indicate that when you register and you will be directed to a website where you can order the materials for the class beforehand.

Call and ask about drop-in sessions and open studio use during regular business hours Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday and Monday 12 to 5 p.m. For more information on upcoming classes and events, go to alpineartscenter.org.

Pumpkin Fest

Village Market is teaming up with Mountain Youth to host its annual Pumpkin Fest in Riverwalk on Sunday from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. Wear your costume and kick off Halloween a little early by heading to the Riverwalk Backyard. Village Market has donated all of the pumpkins, which will be sold for $5 each. In addition to pumpkins, there will be live entertainment and fun family photo opportunities.

After the activities in the Riverwalk Backyard, head to the Riverwalk Theater for a free showing of Tim Burton’s “A Nightmare Before Christmas” at 1:30 p.m. Limited tickets are available, so get yours at Eventbrite before they run out. There is a possibility that the Riverwalk may be able to accept walk-ups on the day of the movie if registered attendees do not show up. Concessions will be available for purchase at the movie theater.

This event benefits Mountain Youth a nonprofit organization that works continuously and collaboratively to improve the lives of youth in the most powerful ways possible. For more information, go to mountainyouth.org.

Live music

Live music is still alive and well in various bars around town and outdoors. Here’s a list of places to go if you want to hear some live tunes up and down valley. Don’t see your favorite artist? Get them listed on our Vail Daily Entertainment Calendar at vaildaily.com/entertainment/calendar.

  • King’s Club Lounge at the Sonnenalp – Vail
  • Kevin Danzig’s Eclectic Mix – Friday – 7 to 10 p.m.
  • Ein Prosit – Avon
  • Al Maul – Friday – 7 to 10 p.m.
  • Loaded Joe’s – Avon
  • Karaoke with Sandman – Friday – 8 p.m.
  • Pop-Up Street Music – Lionshead
  • Brothers Keeper – Saturday – 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Bonfire Brewing – Eagle
  • Primal J and the Neanderthals – Saturday – 6 to 9 p.m.

Coat Drive

Although we’ve had a mild fall with daytime temperatures in the 60s and few snowstorms, the colder weather is approaching and Catholic Charities wants to make sure the youth in our valley are prepared.

For 10 years, Catholic Charities has teamed up with Eagle County Law Enforcement Immigrant Alliance to help collect coats for the annual Fall Coat Drive. This year, Catholic Charities is specifically asking for coats for youth. Drop off your clean coats that are still in good condition to these locations between now and Oct. 30:

  • Vail – Vail Police Department, 75 S. Frontage Road
  • Avon- Avon Police Department, 0001 Lake Street
  • Edwards – Eagle County Sheriff’s Office Substation in the Mountain Recreation Edwards Field House, 450 Miller Ranch Road
  • Eagle – Eagle Police Department, 200 Broadway
  • UW Youth Closet, 439 Edwards Access Rd, Edwards (behind Subway)

Sun & Ski Sports in Avon is also collecting coats. For 27 years, the specialty outdoor retailer has hosted its “Share the Warmth” campaign and has partnered up with Catholic Charities once again.

Bring in a new or used coat to the drop-off bin at the front of the Sun & Ski store between now and Nov. 3. Sun & Ski has extra incentives to drop and shop. Drop off a coat and if you make a purchase, you can earn Sun & Ski Cash to use on a new item. Take photos at certain areas in the store and post using #ShareYourWarmth and tag @sunandskisports and be entered in to win a Patagonia Better Sweater quarter-zip fleece.

Once all the coats are collected, families in need of coats for kids can come to the Youth Closet beginning Nov. 2 during regular operating hours: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday, as well as Monday evenings from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The Youth Closet is located at 439 Edwards Access Road in Edwards, behind Subway.

For more details, contact https://www.vailgov.com/announcements/catholic-charities-and-eagle-county-law-enforcement-immigrant-alliance-announce-10th-annual-coat-drive and sunandski.com/avon-co.

The swap must go on: Vail Ski & Snowboard Swap adjusts event for COVID-19 safety

COVID-19 restrictions have caused many nonprofits to cancel fundraisers this year or turn to virtual events, but for Ski & Snowboard Club Vail, a 50-year-old event did not have to break tradition.

The annual Vail Ski Swap will still be held at Dobson Ice Arena this weekend, but it will look different than it has the past five decades. 

The swap has historically been made possible through the support of approximately 15 vendors in addition to individual community members selling gear at the Swap.

“With COVID-19 indoor restrictions limited to 100 people or less at the time SSCV needed to make a decision as to whether or not to proceed with the swap there was very little, if any, room left for customers after taking into account the vendor staff and volunteers needed to run the event,” said Sharon Schmidt, director of advancement at Ski & Snowboard Club Vail.

“In order to minimize the financial risk of proceeding with the swap, the club made the very difficult decision not to hold the Swap in 2020,” Schmidt said.

That news traveled to the different vendors who participate each year in the event and one vendor stepped up with a solution.

“One of SSCV’s longtime swap vendors, Ski Pro, offered to run the Swap this year as the single, third-party vendor, thus opening up significantly more space for customers with no risk to SSCV,” Schmidt said.  

“We are grateful for Ski Pro’s support in keeping the Swap tradition going in 2020,” Schmidt said.

“It is important to Ski Pro because of the decades of support for the Swap that we have given and will continue to do so,” said Jack Kannapel, of Ski Pro. “The Swap is important to the community because it supports the activities of many snowsports enthusiasts locally and supports the club’s athletes,” Kannapel said.

“Proceeds from the swap help enable Ski & Snowboard Club Vail to be able to provide the level of quality commensurate to the needs and goals of all our athletes so they can become the best they can be by helping to support the operations of SSCV as well as financial aid in the current fiscal year,” Schmidt said.

The Swap will be different this year due to the many precautions taken to keep everyone as safe as possible. Only 100 people are allowed in the building at any time. Tickets are free but you need to go to Eventbrite to reserve a time. At press time, Thursday and Friday were sold out, but there were still times available on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. and on Sunday between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.

What won’t change is the variety of items that can be found and discounts on equipment you need for the winter snowsports season. Skis, snowboards, boots, bindings, poles, helmets, goggles and winter clothing will be up for grabs. 

All sales are final and major credit cards are accepted. For more information, go to vailskiswap.com. For more information about Ski & Snowboard Club Vail visit skiclubvail.org.

Annual Ski and Snowboard Club Vail Swap will look a little different this year

The 51st annual Ski and Snowboard Club Vail Swap has been around so long it’s almost a rite of passage as the valley gets ready to usher in winter. For decades, locals and those in the know have traveled to Vail in October to find deals on new and used gear for the upcoming season.

Skis, snowboards, bindings, boots and accessories are set up in sections throughout the spacious Dobson Ice Arena. Kids, teens and adults can all be outfitted in one location. A portion of the proceeds from the sale goes to help fund Ski & Snowboard Club Vail.

The Swap is historically made possible through the support of approximately 15 vendors in addition to individual community members selling gear at the Swap. Ski Pro, a long time vendor who has participated in the SSCV Swap for many years, will be putting on the event this year.

Ski Pro will still be accepting the following items between 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Wednesday:

  • Skis
  • Ski bindings
  • Ski boots
  • Snowboards
  • Snowboard bindings
  • Snowboard boots

Please note: Ski Pro will not accept skis with bindings that are non-indemnified; these bindings must be removed from the skis in order to sell the skis.

No used clothing or accessories will be accepted for the swap. Ski Pro will have a variety of winter clothing and accessories like goggles and gloves on hand for purchase at the swap.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, the swap won’t operate quite the same as it used to. While it will still be held at Dobson Ice Arena in Lionshead, the large venue will only be able to hold 100 people at a time, and that includes those who are organizing the event.

Tickets are free and will be available on the Eventbrite website, where you can choose the specific time frame when your ticket will get you into the swap. At press time, the event was already sold out on Thursday, but times are still available on Friday between 3 and 8 p.m., Saturday between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. and Sunday between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Eventbrite ticket holders have priority entry, but tickets are not required. 

If you do drop off equipment in hopes of selling your items, please note that unsold equipment must be picked up at Dobson Ice Arena on Oct. 25 from 3 to 5 p.m. and Ski Pro cannot keep equipment after 5 p.m. on Sunday. Do not assume your item has sold if you can’t find your item, check the status of your item here.

All sales are final at the swap and major credit cards are accepted. For more information about the swap, go to vailskiswap.com. For more information about Ski & Snowboard Club Vail visit skiclubvail.org.

Avalanche dogs, Halloween costume contests, restaurant deals, live music and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 10/16/20

Live Music

The fall colors are still holding on and so are the nice temperatures. That weather will bode well for the live music offerings this weekend, many of which are outdoors.

Rewind Halloween Costume Party – Edwards – Saturday

Get your 80s costumes ready for an early Halloween show with 80s retro rockers Rewind, a cover band from Eagle County. Rewind will take the stage under the marquee at the Riverwalk Theater on Saturday night from 5 to 8 p.m. Check Rewind’s Facebook page for more details.

Pop-Up Street Music – Vail Village – Saturday

Shakedown Presents has more live music coming your way. This Saturday the stage will be in the Solaris Plaza. Scott Rednor, owner and musician at Shakedown Bar, has been hosting a series of outdoor concerts due to COVID-19 regulations that have kept his bar closed. Rednor has been working with the town of Vail to provide live music for free on the streets of Vail from 2 to 7 p.m. on Saturdays. For more information, visit shakedownbarvail.com.

Live music at Bonfire Brewing – Eagle – Friday and Saturday

Listen to the sounds of Motown, rock and folk music by Jen Mack, a long-time local who will play acoustic sets at Bonfire Brewing in Eagle on Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. On Saturday, Brian Chinn takes the stage from 6 to 9 p.m. Axe Throwing is back with Wood & Steel Axe Company who will be hosting events every weekend in October. Don’t forget, Bonfire’s patio is heated. For more info, check out bonfirebrewing.com.

Kevin Danzig  – Vail – Saturday

Join Kevin Danzig for his eclectic mix of sounds and songs at the King’s Club Lounge at the Sonnenalp Vail. Enjoy the lounge atmosphere of the Bavarian-style hotel while listening to a variety of musical genres from folk to rock and some of Danzig’s originals from 7 to 10 p.m.

Meet Avalanche Dogs at Colorado Snowsports Museum

Dog lovers, you won’t want to miss the opportunity to meet Vail’s Avalanche Dogs and get some insights into photographer Scott Brockmeier’s latest book, “Skiers’ Best Friends.”

The Colorado Snowsports Museum in Vail will host Brockmeier and have a book signing from 3 to 6 p.m. on Friday. Brockmeier traveled throughout the state of Colorado and got to observe these working dogs in action in his new book. The book will be available for purchase and so will the 2021 Avalanche Rescue Dog calendars.

A portion of the proceeds from the book and calendar sales will be made to the Avalanche Rescue Dog teams. Beer, wine and 10th Mountain Whiskey will be available for purchase during the book signing.

Masks are required and social distancing will be observed. For more information, call the museum at 970-476-1876.

“Purple Mountains”  movie at Riverwalk Theater

Professional snowboarder Jeremy Jones has been enjoying the steepest slopes and deepest snow all around the globe for decades. Now, he’s taking his experience and observations to the slopes and streets to meet the people to discuss climate change. “Purple Mountains” is an hour-long documentary that hopes to build dialogue to help people understand what can be done climate-wise in order to keep enjoying the great outdoors.

The Riverwalk Theater is hosting this documentary on Friday night at 7 p.m. Tickets are free thanks to the help of a former employee of the Riverwalk Theater and some businesses that stepped up to sponsor this event.

“A former employee of mine (who wanted to remain anonymous) reached out to me and wanted to bring this movie to the theater as a way to support our business and bring this specific message to our community given its subject matter,” said Grant Smith, owner of the Riverwalk Theater in Edwards. 

The former employee enlisted the help of Jeremy Lepore of Edward Jones, Alpine Quest Sports store in Edwards, Mid Valley Paint and Hemp Works Colorado, a sustainable wood material made from hemp stalks.

“It means a lot as a business to have groups like this stepping up to show the Riverwalk Theater support and especially for a movie like this that is meant to bring people together. This is 100% in tune with what we are trying to do at the Riverwalk Theater,” said Smith, whose mission is to have the Riverwalk Theater be a place where people can connect with friends and family.

Once again, tickets are free, but reserve yours now by contacting the Riverwalk Theater or by stopping by to reserve tickets. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the maximum capacity is 50 people. Come early and enjoy live music from 6 to 7 p.m. and happy hour specials including $10 chopped brisket sandwiches and $5 Vail Brewing Company Octoberfest lagers.

Back to the movie, expect to see scenic vistas you’d expect from any Jeremy Jones film, but also witness conversations with people on all sides of the issue. To learn more about “Purple Mountains”, view the website and trailer at www.purplemountainsfilm.com. To learn more about the Riverwalk Theater, go to riverwalktheater.com.

Gypsum Fun Fest

Get into the Halloween spirit at the Gypsum Fun Fest this Saturday from 1 to 6 p.m. Costume contests, live music, food and more will be on hand along with a pumpkin weight-guessing contest.

The Gypsum Chamber is hosting this event with The Andrews Team of All Western Mortgage, which will be celebrating its grand opening with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 3 p.m. Stop by its new location and register to win a 58-inch flat-screen television that will be given away at 5 p.m. Neighboring Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Colorado Properties is co-sponsoring the event and many of the activities will occur on its lawn on the corner of Green Way and Highway 6 in Gypsum.

Dress up in your favorite Halloween costume for a chance to win prizes. Awards will be given for the best child and adult costume at 4 p.m. Kids will also receive a Halloween goodie bag. Register to win raffle prizes at the Gypsum Chamber’s registration table at the event. Raffle prizes will be given away at 2 and 5 p.m. Raffle prizes include six complimentary Sunny Pop lift tickets to Sunlight Mountain Resort and gift certificates for local businesses. Guessing the correct weight of the large pumpkin on display can earn you a prize, too.

Grilled hamburgers, hotdogs and other snacks will be provided at this celebration. Listen to live music by Mysterious Forces and enjoy family games on the lawn and the kids can burn off some energy in the Bounce House.

In case of inclement weather, tents and heaters will be in place and Vail Honeywagon has donated mobile hand-washing and sanitation stations for attendees. For more information go to gypsumchamber.org.

Restaurant and shopping deal cards

If you head down valley for the Gypsum Fun Fest, stick around and have a bite to eat at some of the restaurants that are participating in Gypsum Restaurant Daze. Get a Gypsum Restaurant Daze punch card at Gypsum Town Hall or any participating restaurant. During the month of October, stop by all of the 11 restaurants, get your card punched and once you’ve completed the punch card, drop it off at the dropbox outside the main entrance of Gypsum Town Hall by November 1.

Two winners with completed cards will be randomly selected in early November and each winner will get $300 in gift cards to Costco, Ridley’s and Ace Hardware.

Participating restaurants include Creekside Clubhouse & Grill, Turgeon’s, DJ’s + Dahlias, Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli, Trigo Food Co., Subway, Domino’s Pizza, Tu Casa Coffee Shop, Spice of Life and Firebox. For more information to go townofgypsum.org

Access Unbound is offering a discount card as well. Access Unbound’s mission is to transform and heal the lives of people with disabilities or disabling conditions who qualify for its adaptive programs.

The Access Unbound Access Card will allow you to save 20% at many valley businesses and restaurants from now until Oct. 23. Buy the card online for $55 by going to au-accesscard.org. Check out the long list of businesses that are participating while you’re on the website, too. There are tons of great deals to be had, but hurry, the offer ends on Oct. 23.

Take advantage of the savings while helping Access Unbound reach their goal of providing funds for adaptive equipment, scholarships, instructor incentive programs and more.

Pumpkin races, artwalks, mindfulness and live music: Tricia’s weekend picks 10/09/20

ARTwalk in Eagle

It’s the second Friday of the month and that means that Eagle ARTS is hosting another ARTwalk from 5-8 p.m. Parts of Broadway in downtown Eagle will be blocked off so guests can stroll down the street take advantage of specials at participating businesses. Stop by the various booths that line the street and celebrate the arts and celebrate the fact that you have a fun, socially-distanced activity to do on a Friday night.

In addition to the art and business offerings, there will be a special street dance performance by students of More 2 Dance Studio at 6:30 p.m. and live music by The Evolution from 5-7 p.m. Then DJ Kirby will start spinning tunes at Katch of the Day from 7–9 p.m.

Don’t miss this month’s ARTwalk Scavenger Hunt, which has become popular. Download the app and follow the clues to different businesses on Broadway. Finding unique art could earn you a prize.  

The Vail Valley Art Guild’s Eagle Gallery at 108 W. Second Street will be having its Second Friday event in conjunction with the Eagle ARTS event. From 5 to 8 p.m., stop by the gallery and view the work of featured artist Missy Octave. In addition to Octave, other artists include Cindy Kelleher, Soodi Lick, Christine Sena and Barbara Holden. The gallery will also feature works by photographers Raymond Bleeze, Rick Spitzer and Jon Sheppard as well as ceramics by Ann Loper and woodworking by Ken Kolano.

Admittance to the ARTwalk is free and tickets to participate in the scavenger hunt are $5 per person and available for purchase at www.eaglearts.org.

Gypsum Fall Festival

Gypsum is hosting its Fall Festival by spreading people throughout the town hall and library parks, Lundgren Amphitheater, and even Lundgren Street to provide a socially-distanced celebration.

Costumes are encouraged as folks come out to enjoy the various activities for all ages. Zone One (Lundgren Amphitheater) will have a “daylight friendly” movie screen and will be showing “Ghostbusters” at 1, 3 and 5 p.m. followed by a costume parade.

Zone Two (Gypsum Library Pavilion and Lawn) will house the food and live music with bands from 1 to 7 p.m. Food trucks will be available and don’t forget to sign up for the Apple Cider Holding Competition at 2 and 5 p.m. There will be adult and child categories.

Zone Three (Lundgren Blvd.) features a pumpkin decorating contest, pumpkin race and ax throwing. Heats in the pumpkin race will go off at 1:15, 3:15 and 5:15 p.m. Ax throwing will happen between 1 and 7 p.m.

All information on the races, costume contest and decorating contest can be found at townofgypsum.com.

World Mental Health Day

Saturday is World Mental Health Day and local suicide prevention group SpeakUp ReachOut has several ways to get involved.

“World Mental Health Day is a day to remind us to slow down and acknowledge what we need for mental wellness,” said Erin Ivie, executive director of the nonprofit SpeakUp ReachOut. “This year we are offering most of the sessions online so that more people can participate. Intentional mental health care is more important than ever as we navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic,” Ivie said.

Schedule (some events are in-person and streaming):

8 a.m. – Virtual Meditation with Becky Hesseltine

9 a.m. – Yoga/Meditation with Twyla Gingrich of Samya Yoga Healing

10:30 a.m. – Mindfulness Mandala with Alpine Arts Center

12 p.m. “A Mental Health Toolkit for COVID-19” – Lunch and Learn with Dr. Justin Ross

1 p.m. – Financial Wellness Basics w/ Michelle from Cornerstone Financial

2 p.m. – “Practical Steps to Taking Control of Your Life” – Tess Johnson of the U.S. Freestyle Ski Team.

If you don’t have enough time to participate in these events online or in person, Ivie said they are suggesting that everyone takes 10 minutes out of their day to just be still.

“Suicide is complicated and is rarely caused by one factor. The pandemic affects everyone in a different way and therefore it is difficult to predict how this will affect suicide rates in our community. With that said, being aware of your own mental health and what is happening for your friends and loved ones is more important than ever, ” Ivie said. To learn more, go to speakupreachout.org.

Pop-Up Music

Scott Rednor, musician and owner of the Shakedown Bar in Vail Village has been busy playing all over the place this summer. Where there’s a stage, there’s a show and Rednor and his talented team of musical friends will host a few more pop-up shows before the month is over.

This Saturday, follow the sounds of the music in Lionshead and sit back and listen to free live music between 2 and 7 p.m. This week’s band is Mark Levy & Friends featuring Scott Rednor, Joey Porter and Garrett Sayers.

Due to the COVID-19 restrictions, Rednor hasn’t been able to host musical performances at Shakedown Bar at the top of Bridge Street. He created Shakedown Presents and approached the town of Vail with a few ideas for music during the pandemic. Rednor has so many connections in the music world that he’s been able to bring plenty of performers to the Vail Valley and play at pop-up locations throughout town and at the main stage in Ford Park.

“It’s been a blast!” Rednor said. “It’s been fun to explore all the new opportunities. The town of Vail has been supportive and we’ve learned a lot about what live music can do for businesses who are near the pop-up stage,” Rednor said.

If you miss this Saturday, Shakedown Presents will host shows from 2 to 7 p.m. for the next four Saturdays with a special Halloween show on Oct. 31. For more information visit shakedownpresents.com.

Cocktails and Canvas

The Alpine Arts Center is hosting its popular Cocktails and Canvas event this Saturday where adults get to show their creativity while also having an adult beverage. Alpine Arts Center provides all the supplies and instruction for a group project.

Advanced registration required and it’s $45 per person to attend the class. Due to COVID-19, classes are available in-person or virtual. You can still participate via Zoom and that cost is $25 per person, but it doesn’t include materials. You can purchase class kits if you don’t have the right supplies at home.

Get those creative juices flowing with wine or beer for $6 a glass. Please note, you can’t bring in your own alcohol, all alcoholic beverages must be purchased through the Alpine Arts bar. There are some non-alcoholic beverages and snacks available, too.

This Saturday’s class is painting on canvas, but Alpine Arts mixes up the mediums and also has classes working with clay, glass etching, encaustic wax and more.

Follow Alpine Arts Center’s social media pages and website for more details on which classes are offered and look for Halloween-themed classes this month. For more information, go to alpineartscenter.org.

Sacred Cycle hosting virtual, in-person event on Wednesday to empower survivors of sexual abuse, assault

Due to this year’s COVID-19 pandemic, nonprofits have had to come up with new ways to support their missions. The Sacred Cycle, which empowers survivors of sexual abuse and sexual assault through therapy and cycling, is hosting a month-long virtual fundraiser with a goal of raising $30,000.

The virtual fundraiser started on Sept. 14 and goes through Oct. 12. Beyond asking for donations, the Sacred Cycle Virtual Heal Campaign also fosters community by hosting group bike rides, picnics, live painting classes on Zoom and virtual happy hours with games and other means of interaction between participants and more.

During its final week of the Virtual Heal Campaign, Sacred Cycle will host an event called Defining Success with keynote speaker Trish Kendall and panelists on the topic of overcoming obstacles on Oct. 7 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Kendall’s story starts at the pit of her despair and how she overcame many obstacles to find the success and happiness she embraces today. Kendall believes that her single most important lesson in life is that love is your choice.

There will also be a panelist discussion after Kendall speaks that will focus on how to support a survivor, watch for signs and build awareness offering the expertise of these local experts:

This will be an in-person event as well as streamed online to accommodate COVID-19 regulations and also allow this message to be heard by more people. The Highline Hotel in West Vail will host the event in the ballroom and is limited to 50 people. The Sacred Cycle asks that you RSVP for free or donation-based tickets at EventBrite.

The goal of the Virtual Healing Campaign is to raise $30,000 and was chosen because that amount covers the price of a five-month program for 15 women. Sacred Cycle helps women in Eagle County, Denver County and the Roaring Fork Valley, so it is looking to serve five women per region.

Sacred Cycle was founded in 2016 by Heather Russell during a long mountain bike training ride. Russell was a victim of sexual abuse and found that being out in nature and biking helped her heal. Through her graduate studies and working with sexual trauma survivors, she believed that biking, therapy and a sense of community could heal others. Sacred Cycle helps clients discover barriers and break through them to become more confident in their personal recovery journey. For more information, visit sacredcycle.org.

A benefit for firefighters, Oktoberfest, pumpkin patch, pet blessings and more: Tricia’s Weekend Picks 10/02/20

Firefighters Tribute Festival

The smoke may have cleared and the fires contained, but the hard work and the dedication that local, regional and national firefighters went through this season got Dave Kraft thinking. Kraft, a valley local since 1981, decided he wanted to throw a benefit in honor of those who fought so hard to protect Colorado’s landscape.

“I drove the Turtle Bus for weddings, but COVID-19 reduced those trips, and then the fires reduced the Turtle Bus tubing trips we’d do on the river, so with that extra time on my hands, I decided to put together a benefit concert and that’s how the Firefighters Tribute Festival was started,” Kraft said of the event taking place Saturday.

Kraft started calling in favors and got the venue, entertainment and raffle prizes in the span of one month with zero budget. Stoneyard Distillery in Dotsero is providing its large venue for the event. They will also be pouring various drinks including daiquiris and pina coladas for $5. Stone oven wood-fired pizzas will be sold for $14 and the Turtle Bus is offering transportation from Vail, Avon, Edwards and Eagle for $30 round-trip.

Firefighters will get two complimentary drinks and a complimentary pizza. Kraft also wants to honor the firefighters with prizes. There is a free drawing for firefighters where they can win a marble fireman sculpture donated by Rex Branson of the Marble Institute in Marble; two nights lodging donated by the Four Seasons Vail; a guided snowmobile trip; and more.

Local musicians donated their talents for performances that will go on all day. Kraft will play with a collection of musicians in what he calls the Fireman Legacy Band, playing a mixture of classic rock, country and originals. Other artists include Primal J and the Neanderthals, Don Watson, John Dunn, the Al Maul Trio and Helmut Fricker will be there wearing lederhosen along with his companions Charlotte Bogert and Rupert Oberlohr. It’s a fantastic lineup of entertainment that appeals to many age ranges and crosses musical genres.  

The event goes from noon until dark, is free, the drinks are affordable and round trip transportation is $30, so take advantage of the beautiful setting for a good cause. If you’d like to contribute any raffle prizes or for more information, call Kraft at 970-977-9649 or email davekraft2018@gmail.com.

Vail Farmers Market & Art Show

This Sunday marks the last day you can buy products in person at the Vail Farmers Market & Art Show. A 20-year tradition, the Vail Farmers Market & Art Show modified its operations to comply with COVID-19 regulations in order to bring this event to the streets of Vail once again this summer.

Come and get your produce, but there’s also so much more at the Vail Farmers Market & Art Show. Housewares, soaps, candles, jellies, coffee and teas, clothing, books as well as art can be found each week. Instead of having 158 vendors as in years past, the market hosted 58 booths. This year, they implemented a virtual market, which will allow you to keep on buying vendor products throughout the offseason.

Although some of the farms’ crops suffered from a frost earlier this year and wildfires and road closures almost prevented them from getting to the markets, the peaches and other produce still eventually made it. 

“The fires and many other non-COVID-related issues made some of our Sundays different, however, we were able to have most of our vendors show up and they drove over five hours to get here from Palisade,” said Angela Mueller, organizer of the event. “We are glad now that we have pumpkins, squash and so many beautiful apples and pears available.” 

This year the market is providing time slots to get guests into the market to help with crowd control. You may still enter the venue without signing up for a time slot, but your wait to enter the venue might be a little longer, so plan ahead and schedule a time. Wear a mask and there will be plenty of hand sanitizer placed throughout the market. The Vail Farmers Market & Art Show goes from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. For more information on reservations or the virtual market, go to vailfarmersmarket.com.

Oktoberfest at Ein Prosit

Last weekend, Beaver Creek hosted Septemberfest, which gave event-goers a taste of Bavarian fare, beer and music. This weekend, Ein Prosit in Avon wants to help you get your oompah on by hosting its own version of Oktoberfest on Saturday and Sunday from 6 to 9 p.m.

Ein Prosit already carries a variety of authentic German brews on a daily basis, as well as pretzels and traditional and exotic sausages. Try the wild boar with apricots and cranberries or the pheasant mushroom and parmesan sausage. 

This two-day event will have live music as well. They’re not quite the lederhosen guys you’d expect to find at an Oktoberfest celebration, but the Runaway Grooms may throw out a yodel to get the crowd going on Saturday night. On Sunday, Those Austrian Guys will take the stage and with a name like that, don’t be surprised if you find yourself dancing to the “Chicken Dance” after a few brewskis. Check out Ein Prosit’s Facebook page or go to einprosit.net for more details.

Eagle Ranch Pumpkin Patch

Fall is here and along with the autumn colors, cozy sweaters and pumpkin spice lattes, it’s time to get your pumpkins for the season. Grab one to adorn your doorstep or a dozen for pumpkin decorating with the family.

The Eagle Community Gardens will once again host its annual fundraiser in Eagle Ranch on Sunday from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at Brush Creek Park and Pavilion in Eagle Ranch. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Eagle Community Gardens is issuing tickets and time slots for parties of up to eight people.

Tickets are available on EventBrite and you will be given time slots to choose from once you are in the reservation and purchasing system. Reservations are from 9:30 a.m. until noon. Walk-ins are welcome from noon until 2 p.m. Don’t worry, word has it that they will still have a good selection of pumpkins past noon, too.

Each reservation per party costs $5.50 and it includes a small “pie” pumpkin. Once you are in the pumpkin patch, pick out your pumpkins, which will cost between $5 and $10 each.

In addition to finding that perfect pumpkin, there will be a pumpkin maze to go through and an area set up for photographs. Bring your own camera and create a memorable memento of the season. Please note that due to COVID-19 restrictions the usual fair activities won’t be happening this year, but the playground will be open.

Blessing of animals

Does your pet need to be blessed? On St. Francis Day this Sunday you can bring your pet to Edwards to be blessed in honor of this patron saint of animals. In early October, people all over the world will celebrate St. Francis Day, for Saint Francis of Assisi.

Bring your furry friends down to the Freedom Park recreational dog area on the east side of the pond in Edwards. There, Pastor Scott Beebe of Mount of the Holy Cross Lutheran Church will be conducting blessings. It’s not just limited to dogs, all creatures large and small are invited to come with their owners whether by foot, bike or even a drive-by blessing can be conducted.

For more information, call 970-471-3563 or view the website at mountholycross.org.