| VailDaily.com

TRLL 8-10 boys baseball wins districts, hosts state tourney

Despite an early loss in the 8-10 boys baseball district tournament the first weekend of July in Grand Junction, the Three Rivers Little League boys’ baseball team showed a ton of resilience.

The team battled back to get out of the loser’s bracket and claim the tournament championship to advance to the state championship next weekend.

Thanks to the district championship win, Three Rivers Little League will host the state tournament July 19 – 22 at Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel, giving the valley a boost in local youth baseball exposure for the weekend.

Opening up the district tournament in Grand Junction on June 25, the Three Rivers Little League All-Star team picked up a 16-14 win over Colorado River Valley Little League, thanks to a walk-off grand slam to advance to the next round of the bracket.

There, Three Rivers then picked up a 13-2 win over Grand Mesa to advance to the third round before the all-star team dropped a tough 19-13 decision to Monument, pushing Three Rivers to the loser’s bracket.

In the loser’s bracket, Three Rivers showed a lot of heart and resilience, according to head coach Tom Dion, as the boys won its bracket matchup with Fruita Monument, 12-11. A walk-off steal punched Three Rivers’ ticket to the District 1 championship for a rematch with Monument.

“Every single kid on the team has heart,” Dion said. “They just fought and fought. We were down in the game against Fruita and had to fight again; the kids on this team just showed so much heart to get out of the loser’s bracket.”

After getting out of the loser’s bracket for the championship rematch against Monument, Three Rivers needed to beat Monument twice to claim the championship.

The boys did just that, grabbing a 19-15 win over Monument in the first game thanks to a 12-run fourth inning, before winning the tournament on July 1 with a 17-12 decision, setting off a huge celebration for players, coaches and fans.

“It was surreal,” Dion said. “The team, going into the first championship game knowing we had to beat them twice, fought hard and got through it.”

Dion said the team was definitely nervous heading into the first matchup in the championship round, but once the game started the confidence was there.

“Then, when we won, the team went crazy,” he said. “It’s the first time this age group for Three Rivers has won the district championship, so it’s pretty special.”

Turning their attention to the championship tournament, Three Rivers returns to action at 5:30 p.m. July 19 at Crown Mountain Park.

“We obviously want to win the whole thing, but I just want the kids to take the experience away from this opportunity,” Dion said. “Most of them probably won’t have this again in their lives, so I just want them to enjoy the moment and take it all in.”

The Three Rivers Little League All-Star team is made up of players from Edwards, Eagle, Gypsum, Glenwood Springs, Carbondale and Aspen, who played in the regular season in either Minors or Major-Minors for the TRLL.

Team members include: Cain Courtney, Chase Fenton, Ricardo Gutierrez-Juardo, Aiden Justice, Quintin Lovato, Evan Neuman, Tavin Shreeve, Diezl Dion, Clayton Fulk, Brayden Hughes, Kenyon Lovato, Mason McCormick, Gabriel Ortega, and Ryder Strablisky.

In addition to head coach Dion, assistant coaches are Jason Neuman and Chris McCormick.

jcarney@postindependent.com

TRLL 8-10 boys baseball wins districts, hosts state tourney

Despite an early loss in the 8-10 boys baseball district tournament the first weekend of July in Grand Junction, the Three Rivers Little League boys’ baseball team showed a ton of resilience.

The team battled back to get out of the loser’s bracket and claim the tournament championship to advance to the state championship next weekend.

Thanks to the district championship win, Three Rivers Little League will host the state tournament July 19 – 22 at Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel, giving the valley a boost in local youth baseball exposure for the weekend.

Opening up the district tournament in Grand Junction on June 25, the Three Rivers Little League All-Star team picked up a 16-14 win over Colorado River Valley Little League, thanks to a walk-off grand slam to advance to the next round of the bracket.

There, Three Rivers then picked up a 13-2 win over Grand Mesa to advance to the third round before the all-star team dropped a 19-13 decision to Monument, pushing Three Rivers to the loser’s bracket.

In the loser’s bracket, Three Rivers showed a lot of heart and resilience, according to head coach Tom Dion, as the boys won its bracket matchup with Fruita Monument, 12-11. A walk-off steal punched Three Rivers’ ticket to the District 1 championship for a rematch with Monument.

“Every single kid on the team has heart,” Dion said. “They just fought and fought. We were down in the game against Fruita and had to fight again; the kids on this team just showed so much heart to get out of the loser’s bracket.”

After getting out of the loser’s bracket for the championship rematch against Monument, Three Rivers needed to beat Monument twice to claim the championship.

The boys did just that, grabbing a 19-15 win over Monument in the first game thanks to a 12-run fourth inning, before winning the tournament on July 1 with a 17-12 decision, setting off a huge celebration for players, coaches and fans.

“It was surreal,” Dion said. “The team, going into the first championship game knowing we had to beat them twice, fought hard and got through it.”

Dion said the team was definitely nervous heading into the first matchup in the championship round, but once the game started the confidence was there.

“Then, when we won, the team went crazy,” he said. “It’s the first time this age group for Three Rivers has won the district championship, so it’s pretty special.”

Turning their attention to the championship tournament, Three Rivers returns to action at 5:30 p.m. July 19 at Crown Mountain Park.

“We obviously want to win the whole thing, but I just want the kids to take the experience away from this opportunity,” Dion said. “Most of them probably won’t have this again in their lives, so I just want them to enjoy the moment and take it all in.”

The Three Rivers Little League All-Star team is made up of players from Edwards, Eagle, Gypsum, Glenwood Springs, Carbondale and Aspen, who played in the regular season in either Minors or Major-Minors for the TRLL.

Team members include: Cain Courtney, Chase Fenton, Ricardo Gutierrez-Juardo, Aiden Justice, Quintin Lovato, Evan Neuman, Tavin Shreeve, Diezl Dion, Clayton Folk, Brayden Hughes, Kenyon Lovato, Mason McCormick, Gabriel Ortega, and Ryder Strablisky.

In addition to head coach Dion, assistant coaches are Jason Neuman and Chris McCormick.

jcarney@postindependent.com

Take a look at the full LG Triathlon results

Transactions

BASEBALL

Major League Baseball

MLB — Suspended Houston OF Jake Marisnick two games after his violent home plate collision with Los Angeles Angels C Jonathan Lucroy.

American League

HOUSTON ASTROS — Recalled LHP Framber Valdez from Round Rock (PCL).

KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Selected the contract of OF Bubba Starling from Omaha (PCL).

TEXAS RANGERS — Recalled LHP Kyle Bird from Nashville (PCL). Sent OF Hunter Pence on rehab assignment to Frisco (TL). Transferred RHP Kyle Dowdy on rehab assignment from Frisco to Nashville.

National League

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Placed C Yadier Molina on the 10-day IL, retroactive to July 8. Activated INF Matt Carpenter from the 10-day IL. Purchased the contract of LHP Chasen Shreve from Memphis (PCL). Optioned LHP Tyler Webb and OF Rangel Ravelo to Memphis. Transferred RHP Jordan Hicks to the 60-day IL.

BASKETBALL

National Basketball Association

NBA — Named Kate Jhaveri chief marketing officer.

ATLANTA HAWKS — Signed F Jabari Parker.

CHICAGO BULLS — Re-signed G Ryan Arcidiacono.

DALLAS MAVERICKS — Re-signed F Dorian Finney-Smith to a three-year contract.

MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES —Signed G Tyus Jones.

MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Re-signed F Khris Middleton.

HOCKEY

National Hockey League

DALLAS STARS — Signed C Jason Dickinson to a two-year contract.

LOS ANGELES KINGS — Signed F Samuel Fagemo to a three-year entry-level contract.

MONTREAL CANADIENS — R-signed Fs Joel Armia and Artturi Lehkonen to two-year contracts.

SAN JOSE SHARKS — Re-signed Fs Dylan Gambrell and Antti Suomela.

WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed F Brett Leason to a three-year entry level contract.

American Hockey League

ECHL

IDAHO STEELHEADS — Named Everett Sheen coach.

SOCCER

Major League Soccer

COLUMBUS CREW — Named Steve Lyons executive vice president, chief business officer. Traded F Patrick Mullins to Toronto for F Jordan Hamilton, a 2019 international roster spot, $50,000 in Targeted Allocation Money and the Right of First Refusal for an unnamed player.

FC CINCINNATI — Signed D Kendall Waston to a contract extension.

ORLANDO CITY — Acquired M Robinho from Columbus Crew SC for $50,000 in Targeted Allocation Money (TAM).

Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football

CONCACAF — Named Nicholas Noble director of communications.

COLLEGE

IOWA — Announced men’s graduate basketball G Bakari Evelyn has transferred from Valparaiso.

NEW JERSEY CITY — Announced the addition of women’s golf as an NCAA varsity program. Announced men’s golf coach Joseph Yeck was appointed women’s golf coach and elevated to full-time status.

MINNESOTA STATE — Named Brian Sebera and Ben Held assistant track and field coaches.

SHENANDOAH — Promoted Elsebeth Birman to women’s lead assistant basketball coach.

WINTHROP — Announced men’s redshirt freshman basketball F DJ Burns has transferred from Tennessee

Baseball

National League

West Division

W L Pct GB

Los Angeles 60 32 .652 —

Arizona 46 45 .505 13½

San Diego 45 45 .500 14

ROCKIES 44 45 .494 14½

San Francisco 41 48 .461 17½

East Division

W L Pct GB

Atlanta 54 37 .593 —

Washington 47 42 .528 6

Philadelphia 47 43 .522 6½

New York 40 50 .444 13½

Miami 33 55 .375 19½

Central Division

W L Pct GB

Chicago 47 43 .522 —

Milwaukee 47 44 .516 ½

St. Louis 44 44 .500 2

Pittsburgh 44 45 .494 2½

Cincinnati 41 46 .471 4½

Tuesday’s Games

AL 4, NL 3

Friday’s Games

Cincinnati (Gray 5-5) at ROCKIES (Gray 9-6), 6:40 p.m.

Pittsburgh (Archer 3-6) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-4), 12:20 p.m.

Washington (Strasburg 10-4) at Philadelphia (Pivetta 4-3), 4:05 p.m.

L.A. Dodgers (Maeda 7-5) at Boston (Rodriguez 9-4), 5:10 p.m.

N.Y. Mets (Vargas 3-4) at Miami (Smith 4-4), 5:10 p.m.

San Francisco (Anderson 3-2) at Milwaukee (Anderson 4-2), 6:10 p.m.

Arizona (Ray 6-6) at St. Louis (Wainwright 5-7), 6:15 p.m.

Atlanta (Keuchel 2-2) at San Diego (Lamet 0-1), 8:10 p.m.

Saturday’s Games

Cincinnati at ROCKIES, 6:10 p.m.

Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 12:20 p.m.

N.Y. Mets at Miami, 4:10 p.m.

Arizona at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.

L.A. Dodgers at Boston, 5:15 p.m.

San Francisco at Milwaukee, 5:15 p.m.

Washington at Philadelphia, 5:15 p.m.

Atlanta at San Diego, 6:40 p.m.

American League

West Division

W L Pct GB

Houston 57 33 .633 —

Oakland 50 41 .549 7½

Texas 48 42 .533 9

Los Angeles 45 46 .495 12½

Seattle 39 55 .415 20

East Division

W L Pct GB

New York 57 31 .648 —

Tampa Bay 52 39 .571 6½

Boston 49 41 .544 9

Toronto 34 57 .374 24½

Baltimore 27 62 .303 30½

Central Division

W L Pct GB

Minnesota 56 33 .629 —

Cleveland 50 38 .568 5½

Chicago 42 44 .488 12½

Kansas City 30 61 .330 27

Detroit 28 57 .329 26

Tuesday’s Games

AL 4, NL 3

Thursday’s Games

Houston at Texas, 6:05 p.m.

Friday’s Games

Tampa Bay (Chirinos 7-4) at Baltimore (Bundy 4-10), 5:05 p.m.

Toronto (Sanchez 3-12) at N.Y. Yankees (German 10-2), 5:05 p.m.

L.A. Dodgers (Maeda 7-5) at Boston (Rodriguez 9-4), 5:10 p.m.

Minnesota (Gibson 8-4) at Cleveland (Clevinger 2-2), 5:10 p.m.

Houston (Cole 9-5) at Texas (Chavez 3-4), 6:05 p.m.

Detroit (TBD) at Kansas City (Duffy 3-5), 6:15 p.m.

Chicago White Sox (Nova 4-7) at Oakland (Fiers 8-3), 8:07 p.m.

Seattle (Leake 7-7) at L.A. Angels (TBD), 8:07 p.m.

Saturday’s Games

Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 11:05 a.m., 1st game

Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 11:05 a.m.

Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 2:07 p.m.

Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 5:05 p.m., 2nd game

Minnesota at Cleveland, 5:10 p.m.

Detroit at Kansas City, 5:15 p.m.

L.A. Dodgers at Boston, 5:15 p.m.

Houston at Texas, 6:05 p.m.

Seattle at L.A. Angels, 7:07 p.m.

Basketball

WNBA

EASTERN CONFERENCE

W L Pct GB

Washington 9 5 .643 —

Connecticut 9 6 .600 ½

Chicago 7 8 .467 2½

New York 7 8 .467 2½

Indiana 6 10 .375 4

Atlanta 4 10 .286 5

WESTERN CONFERENCE

W L Pct GB

Las Vegas 10 5 .667 —

Minnesota 9 6 .600 1

Phoenix 7 6 .538 2

Los Angeles 7 7 .500 2½

Seattle 8 8 .500 2½

Dallas 5 9 .357 4½

Wednesday

Atlanta 78, Connecticut 75

Phoenix 91, Washington 68

Las Vegas 74, Indiana 71

Minnesota 73, Chicago 72

Thursday

No games scheduled

Friday

Los Angeles at Indiana, 5 p.m.

Minnesota at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.

Phoenix at Connecticut, 6 p.m.

New York at Chicago, 6 p.m.

Dallas at Seattle, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Las Vegas at Washington, 5 p.m.

Soccer

National Women’s Soccer League

W L T Pts GF GA

Reign FC 5 1 5 20 12 9

North Carolina 5 2 4 19 24 12

Portland 5 2 4 19 19 13

Washington 5 3 3 18 17 11

Utah 5 3 2 17 8 7

Chicago 4 5 2 14 17 18

Houston 3 4 4 13 13 18

Orlando 2 8 2 8 12 27

Sky Blue FC 1 7 2 5 8 15

NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.

Friday’s Game

Utah at Sky Blue FC, 5:30 p.m.

Saturday

Reign FC at North Carolina, 5 p.m.

Chicago at Houston, 6:30 p.m.

Sunday

Orlando at Portland, 1 p.m.

Friday

Portland at Utah, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Houston at Washington, 5 p.m.

Sky Blue FC at Orlando, 5:30 p.m.

Sunday

North Carolina at Chicago, 4 p.m.

Wednesday

Washington at Sky Blue FC, 5:30 p.m.

Houston at Portland, 8:30 p.m.

Golf

Top flies for summer

What flies are working?

This is the question that you hear most on the stream, talking to other anglers and definitely in every fly shop. The answer is not an easy one, as it changes month to month, day to day, and sometimes hour to hour. Flies change from river to streams and lakes to creeks.

The selection of your flies can make or break your day and now with the water finally coming back down, the dry-fly fishing should really start picking up. These flies will help you in most situations that you might encounter this summer on the river.

Guide’s Choice Hare’s Ear

This fly is a crusher for any trout that is keyed in on caddis subsurface. This is a variation of the classic hare’s ear nymph. What makes this fly so deadly, besides its classic design, is that it has soft hackle wrapped right behind its beadhead. This soft hackle gives this fly more action and it also traps air to give it the look of an emerging adult.

Rainbow Warrior

The rainbow warrior is one of the best dropper flies to utilize in dry-dropper rig (dry fly with a subsurface fly hung behind it). It’s tied with a tungsten bead which makes it sink fast and gets in the zone quickly. It doesn’t replicate anything specific but works wonders for midge larva and pupa that are almost always present in the water.

RS2

The RS2 is a fly that every angler in Colorado or the West should have in his or her fly box. No questions asked. This fly can be used as a dry, a fly in the film, or a dropper. It’s a very simple fly that imitates an emerging baetis. If you’re having a tough day fishing, tie on an RS2 and in most cases, it’ll turn the day around.

Pat’s Rubber Legs

The first time I saw one of these flies, I scoffed at it. It is an ugly fly. It’s earned its nickname “Cat Poop” because it looked like a small cat turd with rubber legs. However, tie it on your line when the stoneflies are present and it will quickly earn your respect as it did mine. This is a great lead fly in the two fly nymph rig because it’s wrapped in lead under its ugly facade.

Elk Hair Caddis

One of the most iconic and classic dry flies in the game. The Eagle River is a fantastic caddis fly river in the early summer. Waves of caddis flies can be found most afternoons and evenings — enticing dramatic, splashy rises. The elk hair caddis is an amazing imitation of the natural adult. It’s easy to see, floats likes a cork, and has fooled countless trout.

Extended Body Parachute Adams

It started with the Adams dry fly, then it developed into the parachute Adams by putting an easy to see post and horizontal hackle around it. It then evolved to a near perfect imitation of a mayfly with the addition of an extended body. This is my go to pattern for anytime that trout are rising to blue winged olive mayflies. Some of the most wary fish in the tailwaters of Colorado have fallen victim to this fly.

PMX

Parachute Madam X is one of my very favorite general attractor dry flies because it is a high floating, easy to see bug. It can be fished in fast water and imitates stoneflies or caddis flies. It also is an amazing fly to drop nymphs behind due to its ability to float extremely well. This fly can be dead-drifted through riffles or twitched to trigger sudden strikes.

Sculpzilla

One of my all time favorite streamers. This quick sinking articulated trout slayer is tied in a variety of colors; black, natural, and white are my favorite. This fly is a great sculpin imitation that can be used on small creeks to large rivers. It’s incredibly dangerous in a double-streamer rig as the second fly behind a flashy attractor streamer.

Mouse

Yes, trout eat mice. Mouse fishing can be one of the best times you can have with a fly rod in your hands. The anticipation and excitement can be addicting. The best time to mouse fish is dusk to dark and it can be a lot of trial and error to see what works best. Casting blindly into the dark can be frustrating at times however that frustration can quickly evaporate when the sudden burst of noise breaks the silence of a cool summer night. This is the essence of mousing.

TIEs given to you

If you have a friend that loves to tie flies and offers you a couple to try out, take them! Sometimes the best fly to use is a fly that you’ll never find in a fly shop.

When I tie a new pattern, I usually hand out a couple to friends for a test run. Whether it’s a little simple midge, a flashy nymph, or a complex streamer that doesn’t have a name, it’s usually something the fish have never seen and might be the game changer.

When it comes to fly selection, if you have a box stocked with the flies mentioned above, you will be one step ahead of the curve. Take some time and read about what flies are present in the water you are fishing. A combination of that knowledge and these flies should be a recipe for success for even the novice angler.

Get out there and fish.

Ray Kyle is the shop supervisor, customer service lead, and a guide at Vail Valley Anglers. He can be reached at 970-926-0900 or rkyle@vailvalleyanglers.com

View the complete list of Camp Hale Hup results

Men’s beginner

Weston Sawtelle 42:18

Matt Cairns 45:16

Hayden Krueger 45:32

Ben Suttor 45:32

Cole Flashner 47:37

Bobby L’heureux 48:49

Steven Flashner 49:58

Wyatt Young 50:27

Porter Middaugh 51:04

Noah Davis 51:14

Josh Thies 51:16

Brady Potts 51:37

Cooper Smith 52:28

Eric Walz 54:38

Armando Medina 54:41

Kevin Christian 59:12

Women’s beginner

Samantha Lathram 52:39

Michaela Main 55:10

Amy Hawf 58:13

Michele Serine 59:55

Men’s grandmaster 50+

Chip Craft 43:22

Steven Elzinga 43:23

David Lagrange 47:46

T Walters 48:47

Mark Hallenback 51:18

Troy Lange 53:51

Tim Sargent 57:12

Men’s super grandmaster 60+

Thomas Hayles 42:12

Peter Dann 43:30

Philippe Courtois 47:17

Peter Clarke 59:08

Women’s vet sport 30+

Molly Gamble 48:34

Jennie Thorne 50:56

Women’s masters sport 40+

Tanya Walker 50:34

Beverly Smith 51:21

Jerri Niemeyer 51:25

Nancy Mires 52:14

Susi Livran 53:14

Julie Levan 56:34

Carrie Larson 57:14

Vida Wilson 1:10:18

Men’s vet sport 30+

Scott McCorvey 40:37

Matthew Razo 41:46

Paul Datsko 41:59

Miles Henson 42:34

Ian Greene 44:06

Cole Dissinger 44:59

Chris Knerl 46:28

Men’s masters sport 40+

Adam Kowalski 40:56

Kyle Walker 41:10

Craig Chester 45:02

Randy Tuggle 47:22

Fernando Ocampo 48:05

Cody Wyse 1:00:01

Men’s sport

Ethan Elzinga 39:36

Nash Lucas 41:33

Cole Weathers 41:34

Landen Stovall 41:35

Sullivan Middaugh 41:53

Reiner Schmidt 42:48

Garrett Moehring 42:54

Stewie Bruce 45:12

Dillon Harlan 45:27

Michael Ulrich 45:34

Carter Holzhei 45:54

Caleb White 46:07

Louis Fernandez 46:59

Ian Riebe 51:31

Jordan Kehoe 54:10

Mitchell Plath 54:12

Anthony Szuminski 1:15:01

Women’s sport

Shaneis Kehoe 49:38

Tianna Bruce 50:07

Vonda Thomas 1:01:11

Shannatay Bergeron 1:02:07

Men’s single-speed

Ciro Zarate 1:20:38

Mark Nesline 1:23:49

James Ellis 1:26:41

Garrett Alexander 1:27:20

Max Jordan 1:28:56

Jeffrey Rank 1:30:02

Mark Nelson 1:33:28

Battista Psenda 1:34:10

Marty Golembiewski 1:40:58

Women’s single-speed

Sarah Parrish 51:18

Erinn Hoban 53:16

Pamcakes Davis 53:26

Amy Owens 55:30

Men’s clydesdale

David Hawkins 49:18

Jason Bent 54:42

Jason Lahrman 59:06

Men’s expert

Aidan Duffy 1:14:27

Brandon Hansen 1:18:22

Michael Hand 1:19:10

Alex Schultz 1:19:47

Marshall Troutner 1:24:02

Geofrey Ochs 1:26:14

Miles Gentry 1:34:12

Women’s expert

Bayli McSpadden 44:01

Heidi Livran 45:23

Megan Osteen 46:53

Cait Boyd 47:34

Isabella Sargent 49:04

Men’s vet expert 30+

Mike Sherven 1:18:32

Drew Knerl 1:22:41

Dan Findley 1:23:44

Douglas Jimenez 1:23:55

Ryan Simmons 1:33:55

Men’s Masters expert 40+

Adam Collins 1:16:42

Adam Plummer 1:19:57

Mike Glass 1:20:24

Lewis Perna 1:20:30

Matt Donovan 1:22:50

Mike Trueblood 1:24:31

Brooks Leedahl 1:26:55

Brett Donelson 1:32:27

Brian Baker 1:37:21

Women’s masters expert 40+

Jennifer Spinelli 44:02

Jennifer Razee 45:23

Pavan Krueger 46:16

Katie MacFarlane 46:36

Heidi Trueblood 47:31

Beth Bush 48:57

Men’s grandmaster expert 50+

Peter Davis 1:17:05

Stephen White 1:18:29

Robert Moehring 1:19:12

Ron Gruber 1:22:50

Bill MacFarlane 1:22:56

Jim Smith 1:24:14

Chadd Ziegler 1:26:00

Charlie Brown 1:32:58

Dawes Wilson 1:37:29

Mike Stepanek 1:37:36

Men’s pro elite

Taylor Shelden 1:09:54

Cristhian Ravelo 1:10:36

Sam Brown 1:14:18

Alister Ratcliff 1:17:01

Liam Clevenger 1:20:30

David Sanders-Kulesza 1:23:27

Women’s pro elite

Marlee Dixon 1:23:41

Tamara Donelson 1:27:29

Rebecca Howland 1:28:29

Janel Klug 1:28:56

Brittany Spangler 1:31:42

Gaja Wilson 1:39:32

Beginner boys 8-10

Henri Liu 18:52

Marc Drai 19:45

Beginner girls 8-10

Ella Drai 18:00

Sport girls 8-10

Stella Hawkins 33:28

Beginner boys 11-14

Lief McGinley 22:08

Jack Sargent 23:19

Kai Skellion 24:11

Jacob Cairns 24:14

Colin Glackin 25:38

Michael Van Valkenburg 28:07

Sport girls 11-14

Evalynn Skiba 25:32

Sport boys 11-14

Jackson Bumgardner 24:48

Theo Krueger 24:49

Beginner boys 15-17

Ethan Zeeb 22:29

Beginner girls 15-17

Isabelle Broughton 25:50

47th Vail Lacrosse Shootout underway

The Vail Lacrosse Shootout kicked off its 47th annual tournament with the 40 and over divisions — Men’s Supermasters (40 and older), Grandmasters (50 and older) and Zenmasters (60 and older). The pool play bouts determined seeding for the respective divisions as the tournament continues throughout this week and next.

The Vail Lacrosse Shootout is expected to bring roughly 2,000 lacrosse players to Vail and Eagle County over its nine-day run, ending July 7 with the men’s elite division championship, the tournament’s marquee event.

Today the tournament will continue with the three men’s divisions, along with both Boys and Girls U19 divisions.

47th Lacrosse Shootout

Saturday Results:

MEN’S SUPERMASTERS

Team 8 5, Tailgators/Generals 3

Team 8 1, Magic Wands/WLF 14

Tailgators/Generals 1, Magic Wands/WLF 14

Columbus Ballhawgs 3, Navy Old Goats 5

Columbus Ballhawgs 2, Elder Statesmen 18

Navy Old Goats 3, Elder Statesmen 7

Black Lab Sports 1, Middlebury 3

Black Lab Sports 5, Like a Dog 9

Middlebury 2, Like a Dog 5

Silver Oysters 4, Princeton BCLF 8

Silver Oysters 6, Finally 40 5

Princeton BCLF 3, Finally 40 7

MEN’S GRANDMASTERS

Airforce Graybirds 0, Navy Grand Goats 6

Airforce Graybirds 0, Los Viejos de Tejas 12

Navy Grand Goats 2, Los Viejos de Tejas 4

Ephmen 1, Middlebury’s Team Gutman 5

Ephmen 1, Tombstone 7

Middlebury’s Team Gutman 6, Tombstone 5

Princeton BCLF 3, EMW 4

Princeton BCLF 0, Elder Statesmen 9

EMW 4, Elder Statesmen 7

MEN’S ZENMASTERS

Middlebury 3, Navy Old & Gnarly Goats 2

Middlebury 0, Peak-ed Masters 3

Navy Old & Gnarly Goats 2, Peak-ed Masters 7

Eldest Statesmen 12, Mr. Boh 3

Eldest Statesmen 9, Los Abuelos de Tejas 4

Mr. Boh 4, Los Abuelos de Tejas 3

Kyle: Fiberglass fly rods making a comeback in many fishing circles (column)

Fiberglass rods have been making a comeback in many fly-fishing circles. The common fly-fishing rod is made from graphite or a combination of graphite and other materials. The stiffer graphite rods allow for quicker pickup of fly line off the water, the ability to cast farther and an overall lighter rod. So why would anyone want to buy a slower, heavier fiberglass rod? Because they are fun. My fiberglass rod has been my go-to when exploring High Country creeks and streams.

The feel

The first thing any seasoned angler will notice about a fiberglass rod is the amount of flex that these rods offer. Fiberglass rods are often compared to a wet noodle compared to their graphite counterparts. When casting a fiberglass rod, you have to slow down your cast to load your rod properly. Often you can feel the rod bend all the way down to the handle. Slowing down your cast can really help an angler practice the proper techniques and will help you when you go back to casting your fast action graphite rod.

Extra flex in the rod means that it will protect very lightweight tippet. The flex in the rod acts like a shock absorber when fighting a fish. This decreases the amount of tension on very light (six or even seven times) tippet and decreases the chances of breaking your flies off.

Price

The price of fiberglass rods is a major bonus for anyone that wants to try one for the first time. You can usually get a very nice fiberglass rod in your hand for half the price of a graphite rod. This is a great bonus because fiberglass rods are usually an angler’s second or even third rod in their quiver. Redington makes a great fiberglass rod named the Butterstick that is priced at $279. Other companies that make great glass rods are Blue Halo, Echo, Orvis and Scott.

Dry fly-fishing

Fiberglass rods are great for situations in which feel and presentation are incredibly important, such as dry fly-fishing. If you are planning on using small or mid-sized dry flies exclusively, then a fiberglass rod should be in your hand. Fiberglass rods can delicately place dries flies in the spookiest waters.

Small creeks

If you enjoy fishing the smaller feeder creeks in the area, then a three-weight or smaller fiberglass rod is ideal. Besides being great to cast dry flies, a lightweight fiberglass rod makes even the smallest fish feel like a beast. Fighting any size fish on a glass rod is extremely fun and can put a nice bend in the rod. They are also a great tool for the “bow and arrow” cast used in tight quarters. which might be found in and around small creeks.

When to go with your graphite rod

The common graphite rods do excel in many situations due to their inherent strength, light weight and fast action. Grab your graphite rod when you are planning on throwing hopper-dropper rigs, large streamers, heavy nymph rigs, during strong winds, fishing from the boat and when you plan to fish for the entire day. Graphite is also great when the situation demands long distance casting. If you enjoy “Euro nymphing,” then graphite is the choice because it is more sensitive and is a great material for making longer rods.

Fiberglass rods can make fishing some of our local small creeks or streams a blast. I find myself seeking out areas and waterways that are ideal for my three weight glass rod. Many of these creeks are in our beautiful High Country. Do some hiking with a glass rod strapped to your pack and you’ll be converted into a fiberglass fanatic like me.

Ray Kyle is a manager and guide at Vail Valley Anglers. He can be reached at 970-926-0900 or rkyle@vailvalleyanglers.com.

Vail Lacrosse Shootout starts Saturday

If you play or follow the sport of lacrosse, you’ve probably heard of the Vail Lacrosse Shootout.

The Shootout, now celebrating its 47th anniversary, remains one of the premier lacrosse tournaments in the country. While the popularity of lacrosse has exploded over the past several years, you might say the Vail Lacrosse Shootout was not only ahead of its time but was a contributing factor to the growth and popularity of the sport.

This summer, about 2,000 lacrosse players from the ages of 17 to 60 will compete in eight divisions over nine days, once again bringing exciting and competitive lacrosse action to the mountains.

The U19 high school boys and girls teams take to the fields on Sunday and will crown a champion on July 3. Talented high school players from across the country, many of whom will play Division I college lacrosse next year, will compete.

The men’s Elite division is the headliner, bringing fast-paced, exciting lacrosse action to the field. Collegiate and post-collegiate club players, as well as a few professionals, will gather in Vail to battle for the championship starting on July 4 and continuing through July 7.

Positive partnerships

This year the Vail Lacrosse Shootout is proud to again be partnering with two lacrosse nonprofits — the Casey Powell World Lacrosse Foundation and Lacrosse The Nations.

The Casey Powell World Lacrosse Foundation offers support to severely sick or injured lacrosse players and their families. Casey Powell’s organization will host the youth clinic component of the Shootout, letting kids try their hand at lacrosse, learn new stick skills and strategies and have fun. Learn more about the Casey Powell World Lacrosse Foundation at www.worldlacrosse.org.

Lacrosse The Nations uses the game of lacrosse as a platform to reach out to underprivileged children, teaching them life skills, promoting education and bringing joy to their lives. Lacrosse The Nations has programs in Nicaragua, Costa Rica and in the U.S.; and it will be on hand at its booth at Ford Park during the Shootout to talk to anyone and answer any questions about its efforts to help children. Learn more about Lacrosse The Nations at www.lacrossethenations.org.

The 2019 Shootout will again offer live streaming of semi-finals and finals in many tournament divisions. Powell Lacrosse will be present at the tournament as a vendor, offering souvenir Vail Lacrosse Shootout apparel.

For more information, visit the Vail Lacrosse Shootout website at www.vaillacrosse.com.

Pritchard: Are you building strength, or testing it? (column)

It is no mystery that in order to successfully gain strength, one must follow a properly periodized program, consistently.

Effort and execution predominately determine the outcome of training, however, too many individuals attempt to test their strength rather than build it session to session.

Attempting to lift the heaviest weight possible day in and day out, week after week becomes detrimental rather quickly. It is a common myth that every time you step into the gym, you must lift heavier in order to get stronger. If that were the case, strength training wouldn’t need any science.

Multiple forms of progressive overload can yield positive strength gains (lifting heavier weights still being one of them when appropriately used), with the intention to build strength over time. Once you’ve surpassed the “beginner” stage of your first 3-6 months of training, you will not see strength day by day, nor week by week in most cases. You will have to put in work, accumulate fatigue, rest, and super compensate to see gains.

How heavy?

One of the founding fathers in strength and conditioning, Tudor Bompa, wrote multiple books about training athletes for strength, power, speed and endurance. In his book “Periodization of Training for Sports,” he mentions that the majority of “performance enhancing neuromuscular adaptations of strength training occur without concentric failure.” This means that most training cycles occur when athletes are using loads in a range of 70 to 90 percent of their single rep max.

These gymgoers typically use a “buffer” and lift with weights they may be able to execute one or two more reps within a given range and load used. The reason for this is that concentric failure and the use of loads 90-100% of too often can lead to decreased testosterone levels, high levels of fatigue, and increase risk of injury.

There is a time and place for these intensity levels, but they must be used sparingly. In the case of the common gym goer mentioned previously, testing to see how heavy one can go week in and week out will stall strength gains.

Testing one’s strength level should only be done at the completion of a planned mesocycle, approximately every 4 weeks or so, and maximal strength phases using loads in the 90-100% single rep max range should last no longer than 2 to 3 weeks.

Other benefits

Other than the fact that such high intensity levels of training (90-100% single rep max) can cause hormonal, neuromuscular, and fatigue issues, using submaximal (70-90% single rep max) loads allow trainees to maintain good form and grease the movement pattern.

Training for strength is as much coordination of the neuromuscular system as it is peripheral, if not more. Training for qualities such as hypertrophy and endurance require less overall coordination and greater accumulation of peripheral muscle fatigue. This is why it is important to allow the body to learn proper movement and execute under load that is manageable, because failure to complete reps will never allow the body to build its movement competency.

Jimmy Pritchard has a BSc in exercise science from Colorado Mesa University and is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the National Strength and Conditioning Association. He is the director of strength & conditioning at Ski & Snowboard Club Vail. Contact him at 970-331-3513 or jpritchard@skiclubvail.org. Check out his website www.pritchardperformance.com.

Stay Fly: Learn the fly-fishing lingo

Just like any activity, hobby or sport, fly-fishing has its own interesting and sometimes confusing language. Some of the terms are straightforward, while others might confuse even a seasoned angler. This week, I’ll run through some of these words and define them for you, so you can sound wiser while talking to your buddy or local fly shop.

Fly-fishing lingo

Backing: The braided line added to the reel before the fly line. It helps bulk up the reel so the fly line is closer to the outside of the spool. It also adds more line to the reel and is helpful when large fish aggressively run

Barbless: Using a hook with no barb. Some hooks are manufactured without a barb. Many anglers and guides will press the barb down to make the hook barbless. It’s easier to remove a barbless hook from a fish, making it better for catch and release practices

Dead drift: When a fly is presented and traveling at the same pace as the current

Drag: 1) An unnatural motion of the fly caused by the effect of the current on the line and the leader or 2) Resistance applied to the reel spool to prevent it from turning faster

Drift: The intended path of the fly in or on the moving water

Dropper: The practice of fishing two flies at the same time, typically one on the surface (dry fly) and a second fly underwater (nymph or emerger)

Emerger: The phase in the life cycle of an aquatic insect when the nymph reaches the surface and the adult hatches out

Ferrule: The point where sections of the fly rod are connected. The end of one section fits inside the end of another, in an overlapping fashion at the ferrule

Floatant: A waterproofing gel or powder that is used to help flies, tippet and leaders float

Fluorocarbon: Tippet or leader material that is virtually invisible underwater and sinks quicker than nylon materials. Great for nymphing or droppers

Fly line: Line designed specifically for fly-fishing. It is made of tapered plastic coating over a nylon core. Some float, while others are designed to sink. They are weighted to match the weight rod that is being used

Foul hook: Hooking a fish anywhere but in the mouth

Hatch: 1) a large number of adult flies of the same species emerging from the water or 2) The name of one of the most cherished shop dogs in the valley

Headwaters: An upstream section of the river before the main tributaries join it. Typically a much smaller in width and flow than the main part of the river.

Hemostat: Forceps anglers use to remove flies from the fish’s mouth.

Indicator: A fancy, fly-fishing term for a bobber. It is used to detect when the fish takes the fly when fishing nymphs below the water surface.

Leader: The section of line between the fly line and the fly. It is usually tapered to produce a soft landing of the fly.

Mending line: A technique used after the line is on the water to achieve a drag-free drift. It uses a flip or series of flips with the rod tip to put a bow in the line to help prevent drag through varying currents.

Pool: Segments of a river or stream featuring slower currents and more depth. Pools give fish a rest from swimming against heavier currents and are prime feeding grounds.

Redd: A hollow scooped in the sand or gravel of the riverbed by breeding trout as a spawning area. When you see one, stay away and don’t cast to the fish spawning on them.

Riffle: Flows that are sped up going over smaller rocks or gravel at either the head or tail of a pool. These runs are usually shallow, however still hold fish.

Rise: The disturbance of water surface when a trout takes a fly off the surface

Seam: The area where two current flows come together, ideal for holding trout. Fish will hang out in the slower water and make quick moves into the faster flow to eat.

Setting the hook: Pulling the hook into the flesh or cartilage of the fish’s mouth.

Tailwater: The downstream section of a river or stream found below a man-made dam.

Tippet: The end section of a tapered leader, tippet is the smallest diameter section and where the fly is tied onto the leader. Also comes in spools to lengthen or build leaders and rigs.

Wading staff: A walking stick to help stabilize anglers in the fast moving or deep waters.

Weight forward line: An easy casting fly line that carries most of its weight in the forward section of the line. It tapers down from the forward section to a fine diameter running line that allows it to shoot through the guides. It is the most versatile fly line style.

Zinger: A retractable device use to hang tools and keep them out of your way when not in use.

Ray Kyle is a manager and guide at Vail Valley Anglers. He can be reached at 970-926-0900 or rkyle@vailvalleyanglers.com.