Documentary film ‘The Eagle Huntress’ screens in Beaver Creek, April 1 | VailDaily.com
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Documentary film ‘The Eagle Huntress’ screens in Beaver Creek, April 1

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“The Eagle Huntress” follows Aisholpan, a 13-year-old girl, on her quest to rise to the pinnacle of a tradition that has been handed down from father to son for centuries.
Asher Svidensky | Special to the Daily |

If you go …

What: “The Eagle Huntress.”

When: 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 1.

Where: Vilar Performing Arts Center, 68 Avondale Lane, Beaver Creek.

Cost: Free.

More information: Visit http://www.vilarpac.org.

BEAVER CREEK — “The Eagle Huntress,” a documentary film, will be shown at the Vilar Performing Arts Center on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. The story features a young girl’s personal quest through awe-inspiring cinematography. This is a free community film presented by the Vilar Performing Arts Center, Betsy and Jesse Fink and Walking Mountains Science Center.

“The Eagle Huntress” is a British-Mongolian-American documentary film directed by Otto Bell and executive produced by Morgan Spurlock and Daisy Ridley. The film was shortlisted for an Academy Award for Best Documentary and nominated for a British Academy of Film and Television Arts award for Best Documentary.

The Eagle Huntress

The film originally premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival and has since been named a New York Times Critics Pick and an LA Times Critics Pick. Chief film critics at the New York Times, Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott, called the film “a bliss out” and “a movie that expands your sense of what is possible.”

The film follows Aisholpan, a 13-year-old girl, on her quest to rise to the pinnacle of a tradition that has been handed down from father to son for centuries. While there are many old Kazakh eagle hunters who strongly reject the idea of any female taking part in their ancient tradition, Aisholpan’s father believes that a girl can do anything a boy can, as long as she’s determined.

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The story begins after Aisholpan has been training with her father’s eagle for many months. As every eagle can only have one master, the time has come for Aisholpan to capture an eagle of her own. Aisholpan retrieves a fledgling eagle from its nest as its mother circles overhead. Her eagle will live, train and hunt with her until she releases it into the wild years later, so the cycle of life can continue.

Aisholpan enters a renowned competition, the Golden Eagle Festival, and faces off against 70 of the greatest Kazakh eagle hunters. However, the most arduous challenge is yet to come, as the rite of passage for every young eagle hunter is to take part in a hunt. Aisholpan must ride with her father deep into the frigid mountains and endure minus 40 temperatures and perilous landscapes to prove she is a true eagle huntress.

“We were fortunate to be involved in this amazing documentary and pleased to support the showing to make it accessible for all in the community,” Betsy Fink said.

In addition to the film screening, moviegoers will have the opportunity to come face to face with a real golden eagle in the Vilar Performing Arts Center lobby prior to the show. The 36-year-old golden eagle has been a staple at Birds of Prey ski races and boasts a six-foot wingspan.


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