Learn the Science Behind UV Radiation with Walking Mountains Science Center | VailDaily.com

Learn the Science Behind UV Radiation with Walking Mountains Science Center

Daily staff report
newsroom@vaildaily.com
Colorado has the highest UV index in the 48 continental United States, leaving populations living at high elevations at a greater risk of exposure.
Special to the Daily

IF YOU GO …

What: The Science Behind UV Radiation.

When: Thursday, May 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Where: Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon.

Cost: Free, $5 suggested donation, Registration Required

More information: Registration is required and space is limited. Visit http://www.walkingmountains.org/sb to register.

Most skin cancers are a direct result of exposure to the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. Both basal cell and squamous cell cancer (the most common types of skin cancer) as well as melanoma (a more serious and deadly skin cancer) are directly related to sun exposure, as well as indoor tanning.

Nearly 99 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers and 95 percent of melanoma are caused by too much UV radiation. Colorado has the highest UV index in the 48 states, leaving populations living at high elevations at a greater risk of exposure.

In short, the answer is UV radiation. But what does that really mean? Walking Mountains Science Center and Blake Snyder, MD candidate representing Defeat Melanoma, will discuss how to prevent and detect melanoma on Thursday, May 17, at 6:30 p.m.

Participants will learn how UV rays burn skin, why sunscreen works, the ABCDE’s of skin health and the skills to perform these exams in the privacy of their home.

Support Local Journalism

Getting sunburnt doesn’t mean you will definitely develop skin cancer, but the more frequently you sunburn, the more likely you are to develop the disease. Like many of us, if you have had sunburn in the past, it’s a good idea to think about what more you can do to protect your skin next time.

About Snyder

Blake Marleau Snyder graduated summa cum laude in biochemistry & chemistry from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Snyder matriculated into medical school following a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. He has since been cited for academic excellence and has been inducted as one of six AOA Honor Society Leaders within his class. Snyder has been a Defeat Melanoma and Colorado Skin Cancer Task Force board member for the past four years and strives to incorporate international health into his entire career.


Support Local Journalism

Readers around Vail, Beaver Creek and Eagle Valley make the Vail Daily’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

 


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.