Meet rock reporter Ellen Sander at The Bookworm on Tuesday | VailDaily.com

Meet rock reporter Ellen Sander at The Bookworm on Tuesday

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Ellen Sander fell into the early rock scene as a teenager. The writer would be at the forefront of seemingly every iconic moment of rock life in the 1960s, there as much as a fan as she was a reporter.
Special to the Daily

If you go …

What: Rock reporter Ellen Sander at the Bookworm of Edwards.

When: Tuesday, 6 p.m.

Where: Bookworm of Edwards.

Cost: $10, includes appetizers.

More information: Call 970-926-READ or visit www.bookwormofedwards.com.

Ellen Sander now lives a seemingly quiet life in Belfast, Maine, where she is a full-time poet, grandmother and part-time radio show host. Go back about 40 years, and she had a backstage pass to the hottest music scenes of the 1960s.

Meet pioneering rock journalist Ellen Sander at The Bookworm of Edwards on Tuesday to hear weird and wild road trips with companions ranging from Yippies to the members of Led Zeppelin, all laid out in her newly augmented memoir, “Trips.”

If you looked inside Sander’s childhood home, you would see a Victrola crooning with tunes emerging from the speakers.

“My mother loved pop from the 30s and 40s,” Sander said in a news release, “and my father loved classical music. One or the other was almost always playing.”

‘Power of Music’

Sander fell into the early rock scene as a teen. She began to spend her extra moments hanging around Greenwich Village.

“As I was losing one job after another, living on unemployment, I was meeting rock and folk musicians playing in town and engaging in conversations about how the world was changing, the power of music to affect minds,” Sander said.

This connection to the music scene along with her personal drive to become a writer eventually collided.

“It wasn’t long until I got some assignments and published some articles. Eventually I started writing regularly,” Sander said. “I was at the right place at the right time with the right skills.”

Many of the publications she wrote for were struggling to transition to rock reporting, their pages still filled with big band or fine-art music. It was controversial to say the least, with letters piling in every day, both for and against her reportage.

Despite this, Sander was soon at the forefront of seemingly every iconic moment of rock life in the ’60s, there as much a fan as she was a reporter; Altamont, Woodstock, John and Yoko’s bed-in peace and protest talks — the list only goes on.

“All those stories are in ‘Trips,’” Sander said. “But an unusual one was running into Blood Sweat and Tears on the road, I think it was in Duluth but I couldn’t swear by that. We were both doing different venues the following evening but had that night off. So, we went bowling.”