Coronavirus has led to record crowds on Colorado’s public lands and plenty of “knucklehead” situations | VailDaily.com
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Coronavirus has led to record crowds on Colorado’s public lands and plenty of “knucklehead” situations

Firefighters found stacked wood near an illegal campfire that was the cause of a wildland fire in May. The campfire was in the South Thompson Creek area about 11 miles southwest of Carbondale. U.S. Forest Service/courtesy photo

There is something called the “knucklehead factor” in the algorithm of public land management. 

While never spoken of publicly, federal land managers talk among themselves about the challenges of dealing not just with visitors who maybe are not aware of rules, but also with the ones who are irresponsible and dangerous. 

And lately, as record-setting numbers of Coloradans flood public lands, the “knucklehead factor” has grown exponentially. That means coals abandoned in fresh fire pits. Shooting in the dark. Pushing OHVs beyond trails. Walking on that log at Hanging Lake. Breaking down gates and just a general disregard for rules, signs and other humans.  

They are in the minority, those knuckleheads. But they are stressing public lands already feeling the pressure of masses urged to look to the “vast, great outdoors” as an escape from the monotony of quarantine and the stress of pandemic. 

“We are seeing normal use patterns multiplied, so we if had bad apples out there they are multiplied now,” says Aaron Mayville, the deputy forest supervisor for the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest. 

Read more via The Colorado Sun.


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