Vail International Dance Festival concludes with Dance TV, Aug 13 | VailDaily.com

Vail International Dance Festival concludes with Dance TV, Aug 13

Shaina Oppenheimer
Special to the Daily
On Saturday, Aug. 13, at 8:30 p.m. at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, join the Vail International Dance Festival immediately following the Dance TV finale for the Closing Night Wrap Party, presented by Eye Pieces of Vail. The Wrap Party is free to the public, and the bars at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater will be open for purchasing beverages.
Brian Maloney | Special to the Daily |

If you go …

What: Dance TV.

When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13.

Where: Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, Vail.

Cost: Reserved seating is $50 to $95, lawn seating is $20, and children 12 and younger are free.

More information: Visit vaildance.org, or call 970-845-8497.

That’s a wrap

On Saturday, Aug. 13, at 8:30 p.m. at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, join the Vail International Dance Festival immediately following the Dance TV finale for the Closing Night Wrap Party, presented by Eye Pieces of Vail. The Wrap Party is free to the public, and the bars at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater will be open for purchasing beverages.

Today, at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, the Vail International Dance Festival will round out its season with the return of Dance TV, bringing together all genres of dance, collaborations and stars from popular dance television shows to the Vail stage.

For the past 10 years, under Damian Woetzel’s artistic direction, the festival has presented more than 45 new works, and this season, he added approximately 10 world premieres to that list. The season closer will bring the audience to their feet, as Woetzel showcases dancers from “So You Think You Can Dance” and “Dancing with the Stars,” featuring Lauren Froderman, Nico Greetham, and Kent Boyd; YouTube sensation Chloe Arnold’s Syncopated Ladies and festival favorites, including Isabella Boylston, Tiler Peck, Lil Buck, Ron “Prime Tyme” Myles, Robert Fairchild and James Whiteside.

“It is a real pleasure to realize how Vail has brought together so many dancers, choreographers, musicians and audiences over the past years,” Woetzel said. “For me, the spirit of collaboration has been the most vital part of the festival, giving artists the chance to experiment and work in new forms with new partners and, for audiences, the chance to experience this work and be a part of the art itself through our community work for children and adults alike.”

Dance TV features a talk show-like atmosphere with Vail Daily “Off the Hill” host Tricia Swenson and television host and producer Erik Williams as the evening’s emcees. Swenson and Williams get comfortable with the dancers, as they invite the artists to sit on their couch and share their experiences with the audience. The open dialogue serves to bridge the gap between the dancers and the audience, demonstrating how the festival integrates various styles of dance.

“After most performances, you go right off stage, but it’s nice to be able to talk about the piece and explain what inspired you to do create it,” Myles said.

Myles is no stranger to the Vail stage. He has danced alongside Peck and Dubstep dancer Adi Malcom, as well as in a dance battle with traditional Indian dancer Shantala Shivalingappa. The audience usually sees him in high-energy performances, mixing freestyle movement and street dancing.

“We get to showcase our heritage and culture of Memphis Jookin’. Our dance style is freestyle-based movement, so putting choreography to it is something so different,” Myles said.

Woetzel is vital in helping the dancers choreograph. Myles will begin collaborating with fellow artists and then bring the ideas to Woetzel.

“His vision of how he sees everything is so huge. He can easily turn nothing into something,” Myles said. “We create these pieces that are pure art because he’s always thinking of the little things. He has so much research in his mind where there’s unlimited opportunities.”

Dance TV isn’t only about bringing distinct styles of dance together; it’s about celebrating a melting pot of art, culture and music.

“Working with different styles (of dance) is fun because you never know what you can get out of it,” Myles said.

Based on years past, as well as the pieces seen at this year’s festival, it is clear the Vail Valley is in for a treat.

“It’s the best for last,” Myles said. “What better way to close a festival, that goes beyond mere diversity in giving dancers the platform to collaborate, than a final show dedicated to this cause? Further, it gives the opportunity to open dialogue amongst dancers and the audience about what it means to come together in celebration of dance.




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