B’Nai Vail Congregation hosts Hanukkah celebration Friday, Dec. 11 | VailDaily.com

B’Nai Vail Congregation hosts Hanukkah celebration Friday, Dec. 11

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The B'Nai Vail Congregation's Hanukkah celebration starts at 5 p.m. nightly through Sunday at Vail's Covered Bridge. Following the Menorah lighting, you can stroll back to the Vail Interfaith Chapel for traditional Hanukkah food. The Hanukkah service follows at 6 p.m. in the chapel.
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If You Go ...

What: Hanukkah celebration with the B’Nai Vail Congregation.

Where: Covered Bridge, Vail Village.

When: 5 p.m. nightly through Sunday, the end of Hanukkah

Cost: Free

More information: After the Menorah lighting, you can stroll back to the Vail Interfaith Chapel for the traditional foods of Hanukkah and an olive oil tasting. B’Nai Vail Congregation’s Hanukkah service follows at 6 p.m. Visit www.bnaivail.org for more information.

VAIL — The B’Nai Vail congregation is celebrating Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights, and is inviting the community to join them.

This annual event attracts crowds of children and families to the menorah for an inclusive community gathering. Rabbi Joel Newman and cantor Michelle Levy will lead a celebration and singing and discover the joys of Hanukkah.

“This candle lighting brings the joy of Hanukkah to a public space — that’s not something you see every day,” Newman said.

Hanukkah is one of the most widely celebrated American Jewish holidays. Jewish communities throughout the United States celebrate the first day of Hanukkah on the 25th day of the month of Kislev in the Jewish calendar. The Hanukkah festival lasts for eight days. The first night of Hanukkah starts with special blessings and songs when the menorah, also known as the hanukiah, is lit.

Origin of Hanukkah

Hanukkah commemorates the Jewish people’s successful rebellion against the Syrian Greeks in the Maccabean War in 162 B.C. A ritual cleansing and rededication of the Temple occurred after the Jewish people’s victory.

It is believed that there was only enough consecrated oil to keep the lamp burning for one day, but the small bottle of oil miraculously lasted for eight days. Thus, many Americans of the Jewish faith eat food fried in oil, such as potato latkes and donuts. Hanukkah is referred to as the Festival of Lights for this reason.

This family-friendly Hanukkah celebration is open to the entire community and is sponsored by B’Nai Vail congregation. Visit http://www.bnaivail.org for more information.