Booze reviews in Eagle County | VailDaily.com
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Booze reviews in Eagle County

Daily Staff ReportsVail CO, Colorado
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Every once in awhile it is important to remember there is more to the red-wine world than the varieties that get all the press. In particular, Malbec deserves a little more mainstream recognition. If you are looking for a new red that is not your standard pinot, merlot or cab the Don Miguel Gascon 2006 Malbec is a good place to start.The wine is from the Argentinean Andes, in the Mendoza region. Mendoza is just over the mountains from Chile and some legendary skiing. Basically, this is a ski area wine so it should fit in easily in the Vail Valley. The grape is originally from Southern France near the area of Cahors. It was brought over to Latin America in the mid-19th century and adapted so well that its now associated almost exclusively with Argentina. The wine has a smooth, full body. The flavors focuses on darker fruits like blackberry, blueberry and dark cherry with a hint of mocha. But dont be fooled just because the flavors are dark doesnt mean the wine is heavy. In fact it is smooth and easy to drink. It is a great bottle to open on a cold evening. I would suggest pairing it with a hearty beef stew. It will be able to stand up well to bigger flavors.The other remarkable thing about wines from Latin America is their price range. This wine is no different. At $12.99 a bottle this wine is the right price to keep around the house. My guess is that buying it will be easy but keeping a full bottle around the house will be challenging. Jessica Slosberg, Daily Staff Writer

The 2006 Triennes Viognier Sainte Fleur came with a glowing recommendation, If this wine were a woman, I would marry her, said Dan Mahan, sommelier and cigar, beer and liquor specialist at Beaver Liquor. This is a classy and elegant wine.With a recommendation like that how could I not try this white French-country wine? Well I couldnt pass it up, and I was extremely pleased with what I encountered. The wine has great flavors without being too dry or too sweet. In fact, the wines greatest attribute is its balance between the two.When tasting the wine I noticed softer fruit flavors but I couldnt exactly name the. It wasnt overwhelming, not bold like a citrus or vanilla, but it still had good body. I went to the Web site, http://www.triennes.com, and saw that in the winemakers notes, the first flavor the drinker will notice is apricot. Ive never tasted apricot in a wine before and believe me, it is a great flavor; It has all the great characteristics of an apricot.The other thing I like about this white wine is that it isnt your usual sauvignon blanc, riesling or chardonnay. Mahan described the grape as a cousin to chardonnay. But he elaborated further, chardonnay is like someone who went to community college and a viognier is like someone who went to Cambridge. I am always interested in trying new grapes and this one is definitely going to become a regular part of my repertoire.At $17.99 the wine is in the upper range of affordable but could be just the thing to share with your own classy guy or gal. Jessica Slosberg, Daily Staff Writer

Ill admit it, I was first drawn to this Swedish-made vodka because of the price point. Its about the same price as Smirnoff but Id heard from friends that its significantly smoother. Turns out they were right. Mixed with the usual suspects cranberry juice, tonic or bloody mary mix you can barely taste the alcohol. Alone the spirit is crisp and clean.People in the industry seem to agree the vodka has won a handful of awards including Gold Medals at the 2005 and 2006 San Francisco World Spirits Competition and a rating of 93 points and Best Buy status from Wine Enthusiast Magazine in 1999 and 2004. This 80-proof spirit combines a centuries-old Swedish vodka recipe with tomorrows distillation technology, according to their website, http://www.svedka.com. Though I usually stick to the unflavored vodkas, Svedka also comes in Citron (made from California lemons and Mexican limes), Clementine, Raspberry and Vanilla. Svedkas controversial ad campaign is clever, if not slightly confusing (why they used a well-endowed fembot-fatale named svedka_grl as their spokes-bot is beyond me). They claim that in 2033 Svedka will be the most popular vodka in the world. One ad reads Svedka salutes L.A., home of the first drive-thru plastic surgery window; another says Svedka reminds you to do your part to end global warming. Add more ice. Bored? They also have a clever feature called The future you. Upload a picture of yourself, answer a few tongue-in-cheek questions and theyll show you a picture of what youll look like in 2033. Caramie Schnell, Arts & Entertainment Editor


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