Cavers search for strange snottites | VailDaily.com
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Cavers search for strange snottites

Allen BestVail, CO Colorado

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS Care to venture a guess as to what a snottite is?Before forming your answer, it may be useful to know that its the sort of thing that cavers may seek. In this case, the cavers had assembled in Steamboat Springs, and after a highly toxic gas called hydrogen sulfide was pumped from Sulfur Cave went in in search of these snottites.And the cave did have snottites. They are, reports The Steamboat Pilot & Today, similar to stalactites, which hang tightly from cave ceilings. But the texture of a snottite is very different from a rigid stalactite. A snottite has here it comes the consistency of snot, or mucus. They are composed of single-celled bacteria.As I blew on them, theyd start to sway back and forth, Mike Frazier, a caver, told the paper. Cavers said that a cave in Mexico also has the snottites.

SILVERTON With Silverton at its heart, San Juan County is a maze of gravel and dirt roads, some of which connect to the neighboring towns of Telluride, Ouray, and Lake City. The roads climb around and over 13,000-foot peaks, and they become busy during summer months with all-terrain vehicles.Colorado law requires only that operators of ATVs be a at least 10 years old and within line of sight of an adult. A person cant get a learners permit to drive a car or truck until they are 15 years, 3 months.But San Juan County several years ago mandated a drivers license and proof of insurance for anybody driving an ATV within the county.This, reports the Silverton Standard & Miner, has not pleased everybody in the community. One motel operator, noting that ATV operators bring a lot of money to this area and keep us all going, urged the county to bring its regulations in line with the states. Another speaker said that the requirement of a minimum age of 16 seemed anti-family.The Standard reports a well-attended meeting, and overwhelming sentiment including from the county commissioners for staying the course. Among the arguments, reports the Standard, is safety, is young ATV riders get into a lot of accidents. San Juan County Sheriff Sue Kurtz was among those urging no change to county regulations. The problem is 20 times more than it was 10 years ago, Kurtz said. Animas Forks a ghost town between Silverton and Lake City has become a major staging area for ATVs. Its a dangerous situation, Kurtz said. We have too big a volume of traffic.


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