Proposition 119: Colorado voters will decide whether to raise marijuana taxes to pay for out-of-school learning | VailDaily.com
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Proposition 119: Colorado voters will decide whether to raise marijuana taxes to pay for out-of-school learning

Supporters say it will help close the achievement gap while opponents see it as a slippery slope toward privatizing education

Daniel Ducassi
The Colorado Sun
A bud tender holds two marijuana buds on his fingers on the way to a customer at the Denver Kush Club in north Denver. A coalition that wants to ask Colorado voters to approve higher taxes on recreational marijuana to help children make up for learning losses during the pandemic and address tutoring and other special needs for low-income and disadvantaged children said it's been endorsed by former Democratic and Republican governors.
David Zalubowski/AP

Colorado voters will decide next month whether to raise taxes on recreational marijuana to help fund a new state program aimed at providing Colorado students with out-of-school learning opportunities.

The program, called Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress, or LEAP, would pay service providers, like private tutoring companies or even public school teachers looking for extra work, to provide a wide variety of educational or development support services to K-12 students in the state.

Supporters of the measure, called Proposition 119, say that by giving kids from lower income families a chance to access tutoring and enrichment programs, the program can help those kids catch up academically to their more privileged peers and start to reverse the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on learning.



Public education advocates who oppose the measure, however, paint it as a slippery slope to vouchers and a threat to the state’s public education system, and argue that any new tax revenue for education should go into the existing system rather than a whole new program. Meanwhile, opponents in Colorado’s cannabis industry say the increased sales tax is regressive and may push consumers back into the black market.

Read more via the Colorado Sun.




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