Why Colorado’s hospitals have bent — but not broken — during the latest COVID surge | VailDaily.com
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Why Colorado’s hospitals have bent — but not broken — during the latest COVID surge

The state’s relatively high vaccination rate is one reason

John Ingold
The Colorado Sun
Jack Reed, 13, receives his first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine by Dr. David Wahl, who is retired but came to help with a vaccination clinic, Thursday, May 13 at Vail Health Hospital in Vail.
Chris Dillmann/Vail Daily archive

Nearly 19 months in, these are some of the toughest days for Colorado hospitals during the coronavirus pandemic.

Even as the latest surge in coronavirus hospitalizations appears to have plateaued — what state epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy this week called an “unstable equilibrium” — hospitals across Colorado have still been scrambling to add critical-care beds and some have been postponing non-emergent surgeries in order to free up space.

As of Thursday, Colorado had a scant 148 ICU beds available statewide and 28% of hospitals were expecting to experience a staff shortage within the next week. Hospital leaders speak of staff burnout, of trouble keeping employees when lucrative gigs as traveling nurses to COVID hotspots abound.



Despite the renewed — and exhausting — strain on the system, things in Colorado are nowhere near as bad as they are in other parts of the country.

Read more via The Colorado Sun




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