Denver: New fountain, solar panels await Dem delegates | VailDaily.com
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Denver: New fountain, solar panels await Dem delegates

DENVER, Colorado ” A fountain built to dazzle the delegates at the 1908 Democratic convention in Denver has been rebuilt in time for the 2008 convention.

The Electric Fountain was a tourist attraction when it was unveiled in City Park a century ago, launching 90-foot towers of water under multicolored lights.

It fell into disrepair, and a $3 million reconstruction project was begun in 2006.



City officials determined that restoring the original wasn’t feasible, so it was torn out and rebuilt to duplicate the appearance of the structure as well as the water and color displays.

The new version includes energy-saving features including LED lights.



City Park is about 3 miles east of the Pepsi Center, where the convention will be held.

Denver International Airport’s sprawling new solar power system was dedicated Tuesday amid preparations for the Democratic National Convention.

Delegates flying into Denver can’t miss it: the 9,200 panels cover 71/2 acres beside the main highway to and from the airport terminal.



The photovoltaic system will generate over 3 million kilowatt hours of electricity a year. City officials say that will reduce carbon emissions by more than 6.3 million pounds a year.

Some Denver convention visitors may get into their hotel rooms with biodegradable wooden key cards instead of the traditional plastic versions.

Boulder-based Sustainable Cards says it has partner with card manufacturer CPI Card Group to donate more than 70,000 of the cards to Denver hotels.

Sustainable Cards says they are made from sustainably harvested wood and bear the Denver Host Committee’s logo.

The company says the cards have been used for nearly a decade in Europe hand have been shown to be as durable as the plastic version.

The company says switching to the wood cards nationwide could reduce plastic waste by 1,300 tons a year.

http://www.sustainablecards.com/


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