Do you lock your cars or homes, Eagle County? | VailDaily.com
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Do you lock your cars or homes, Eagle County?

Steve LynnVail, CO Colorado
Kristen Anderson/Vail DailyVail resident Jeffrey Storz gets into his car Tuesday after purchasing gas at the Shop & Hop in Eagle-Vail. Storz said he does not lock his car unless he is in a city.
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EAGLE-VAIL, Colorado Amber Anderson has kept her doors locked ever since her Chapel Square home was broken into.Around $2,000 in possessions, including CDs, purses and wallets were stolen from Andersons home, she said. Her husbands keys and his truck were also stolen, she said.Like Anderson, plenty of residents say they lock their doors to prevent crime in their lives. Other residents say they carry guns, separate their skis and buyburlgar alarms for their homes.

The majority of thefts in Eagle County occur when people leave their cars and homes unlocked, said Shannon Cordingly, spokeswoman for the Eagle County Sheriffs Office.Its a huge way to kind of prevent yourself from being the victim of a crime, Cordingly said about locking doors. On Monday night, two men were arrested for stealing prescription drugs and stereos from unlocked trucks in Gypsum, the Eagle County Sheriffs Office said. Julian Salcedo, 22, and Joshua Chacon, 19, both of Gypsum, were arrested on suspicion of breaking into the trucks in after footprints in the fresh snow led sheriffs deputies to them, the Sheriffs Office said. Those footprints also led to other cars that were locked that the men didnt break into, Cordingly said. Salcedo and Chacons charges faces four felony counts of first-degree criminal trespass in connection with the burglaries around Park Street and First Street, the Sheriffs Office said.

Jude Fusco, a Vail Valley resident for 10 years, is from Detroit and thats probably the reason he tends to lock his home and cars all the time, he said. He also puts each ski in a different ski rack when he takes a break on Vail or Beaver Creek mountains, he said. Local self-defense instructor Mathew Bayley goes further. Bayley, who sells guns on his Web site http://www.ontargetatvail.com, carries a gun almost all the time, he said. Most of the students who take his shooting classes which he plans to have more of this March are women and senior citizens, he said. We are not vigilantes, but we are protecting ourselves, our families and our ability to provide for our families, Bayley said. To deter burglars, Bayley recommends putting signs that say Beware of dog or Premises under surveillance even if they dont have a dog or surveillance cameras. If a person is home alone, he or she should turn on the television in one room and turn on the lights in another room, he said. If you are alone, you want to create the perception that youre not, he said. People also can use motion detectors that turn on lights, the sound of a dog barking or a persons voice.Home security alarms are the most popular selling products at Vail Electronics, said the Avon stores owner, Don Anderson. Customers buy motion detectors and electronic switches on doors and windows that trigger an alarm. That alarm goes directly to police dispatchers who send officers out to check on the home, Anderson said. People also buy remote controls that switch their home alarms on and off. The remotes also have buttons for police and medical emergencies, Anderson said. If you can think of it, it can be done with a security system, Anderson said.



Anderson and other residents think that locking doors while inside a convenience store may be overkill. Mark Haynes, an employee of Shop & Hop and Vail resident, once saw a woman lock the doors to her Lexus as she grabbed a newspaper from outside the convenience store. She went back to her car, unlocked her door and got inside. I said to myself, Who locks their door to walk to a newspaper box? Haynes said. Haynes leaves his door unlocked with his keys in his car, he said. But his decision to lock his car depends on what he might have in it at the time, he said. If I had a lap top on my passenger seat, I would probably lock my car, he said. Drew Brock left his car which he he had just bought unlocked and running at the Shop & Hop as he talked with a clerk inside for a few minutes. Its a combination of my background and just having faith in people, said Brock, an Avon resident who grew up in rural Virginia.Staff Writer Steve Lynn can be reached at 748-2931 or slynn@vaildaily.com.


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