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Homestake hike highlights uncertainties with proposed reservoir project

Memorandum of understanding may be based on outdated hydrology

Heather Sackett
Aspen Journalism
Ken Neubecker, formerly of American Rivers, gives a presentation about the Eagle River Memorandum of Understanding during a hike and public outreach event organized by the Eagle River Watershed Council. The 1998 MOU, which lays out the amounts of water the signatories are entitled to develop, may be based on hydrology that is outdated due to climate change impacts of the last 20 years.
Heather Sackett/Aspen Journalism

HOMESTAKE VALLEY — The Eagle River Watershed Council on Tuesday hosted a hike for the public in the Homestake Valley, an area receiving increased scrutiny because of a project that proposes to take more water from the Colorado River basin and bring it to the fast-growing Front Range.

The goal of the event — which included presentations from representatives from public-lands conservation group Wilderness Workshop, municipal water provider Aurora Water and other experts — was to provide a broad overview of a complicated issue, according to Holly Loff, the executive director of the Eagle River Watershed Council.

“We know it’s going to be a long process, but we want to make sure people are engaged in the conversation and look to us as a resource,” Loff said. “We will continue to provide science-based, factual information.”



The watershed council advocates for the health of the upper Colorado and Eagle river watersheds through research, education and projects, according to its website.

The cities of Colorado Springs and Aurora, which operate together as Homestake Partners, have water rights in the Homestake Valley and plan to use them to develop Whitney Reservoir. The project would be located near the Holy Cross Wilderness Area, which is 6 miles south of Red Cliff. Homestake Partners is currently doing geotechnical drilling to study whether the soil and bedrock in the area could support a dam and reservoir.



This drilling equipment sits on U.S. Forest Service land near where Homestake Partners is conducting a geotechnical study to see if bedrock and soil conditions are suitable for building a new dam and reservoir in the valley. The study may help determine if a project is feasible to bring more water from the upper Eagle River watershed to Front Range cities.
Heather Sackett/Aspen Journalism

The proposed project would create a new reservoir on lower Homestake Creek, where water collected would be pumped up to the existing Homestake Reservoir, about 5 miles upstream. Then it would go through a tunnel under the Continental Divide to Turquoise Reservoir, near Leadville, and then to Aurora and Colorado Springs. Various configurations of four potential reservoir sites show it holding between 6,850 and 20,000 acre-feet of water.

Project opposition

Although it’s still early in the process and no application for the storage project has yet been filed, the proposal already has opposition. Some iterations of the project call for moving a section of the Holy Cross Wilderness boundary, which requires involvement from Congress, and would inundate rare, groundwater-fed, peat wetlands known as fens. The U.S. Forest Service received nearly 800 comments about the drilling study during its public scoping phase last year, and most of the remarks were against the entire reservoir project.

Some who attended the hike — which attracted about 20 people — questioned the concept of taking more water from the headwaters of the Colorado River over to thirsty and growing Front Range cities in the face of a climate change-fueled crisis.

Contractors for Homestake Partners cut this road on Forest Service land in the Homestake Valley so drilling equipment can access test sites for a geotechnical study. The study may help determine if a dam-and-reservoir project is feasible to bring more water from the upper Eagle River watershed to Front Range cities.
Heather Sackett/Aspen Journalism

“I’m just very concerned that if this is a typical year, is there enough water in the drainage to take 20,000 acre-feet out every year — and how does that tie into the future curtailment call on the Colorado Compact?” said Tom Allender, who is board president of the watershed council, a former board member of Eagle River Water and Sanitation District and a retired planner for Vail Resorts.

The compact call Allender mentioned could occur if the upper-basin states (Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico) can’t deliver the 7.5 million acre-feet of water per year to the lower basin states (Arizona, California and Nevada), as required by a nearly century-old binding agreement. Water users in the upper basin would be forced to cut back, something known as “curtailment.”

A larger share of the state’s cutback obligations could fall to Front Range water providers, since most of the water rights that let them divert water from the Colorado River basin over the Continental Divide are “junior” to the compact, meaning they were made after the 1922 agreement. If there was a compact call, Front Range diverters could potentially have to stop diverting water and let it flow downstream to Lake Powell.

Contractors for Homestake Partners are drilling test holes for a geotechnical study near Homestake Creek. A proposed project could develop more water from Homestake Creek forAurora and Colorado Springs, and could also benefit Western Slope entities.
Heather Sackett/Aspen Journalism

“If the Homestake Valley is important to people, and if they are interested in the impacts of a compact call and the impacts of climate change overall, then they should have an eye out for additional transmountain diversions,” Loff said. “That’s a bigger concern than a reservoir in general.”

Last year, Homestake Partners tested how they could get their stored water to the state line in the event of a compact call by releasing downstream about 1,700 acre-feet from Homestake Reservoir.

Eagle River MOU

Homestake Partners is not the only entity set to benefit from a new water-storage project. The Eagle River memorandum of understanding lays out a plan for both Front Range and Western Slope entities to develop water in the upper Eagle River basin. The agreement, signed in 1998, provides 20,000 acre-feet of water a year to Homestake Partners and 10,000 acre-feet a year to the Colorado River Water Conservation District, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority, and Vail Resorts, known collectively in the memorandum as the “Reservoir Company.”

Ken Neubecker, a retired Colorado project director at American Rivers and a former environmental representative on the Colorado Basin Roundtable, gave an overview of the memorandum. He said the 23-year-old agreement is based on hydrology that is now outdated because of the worsening impacts of climate change. The models used to estimate stream flows are based on records from 1945 to 1994.

Homestake Valley, in the upper Eagle River watershed near Red Cliff, is narrow and filled with aspen trees. A proposed water project could develop more water from the valley for the benefit of Front Range municipalities and Western Slope entities.
Heather Sackett/Aspen Journalism

“Storage is an early 20th-century response to water-shortage problems and doesn’t really fit in the conditions we are facing now in the 21st century, and it’s based on laws established in the 19th century,” Neubecker said.

In their presentation, representatives from Aurora Water laid out the measures that the municipality is taking to conserve water, including offering rebates for high-efficiency toilets, water-wise landscaping and irrigation efficiency. Over 10 years, Aurora says it has conserved almost 500 million gallons, or about 1,500 acre-feet.

That savings, however, does not translate into Aurora taking less water from the Western Slope. About 25,000 acre-feet of water a year is sent through Homestake Tunnel to the Front Range.

“We are a growing community,” said Greg Baker, manager of public relations for Aurora Water. “Our conservation program helps us meet that future need the development is going to place on our system. Does it reduce (transmountain diversions)? No. Does it mean we are using the water more efficiently? Yes.”

Baker said there are still a lot of uncertainties with the Whitney Reservoir project. The geotechnical drilling study will help determine whether it is feasible to move ahead.


“We have not applied current climatological conditions to (the memorandum) yet because we haven’t gotten that far,” he said. “Until we know exactly what comes out of that report, we can’t say what we would want to pursue. It’s way too early for us to even come up with that timeline.”


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