Eagle’s Brush Creek Saloon reopens | VailDaily.com
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Eagle’s Brush Creek Saloon reopens

Kristin Anderson/kanderson@vaildaily.comBuilding owner Wendy Sacks stands outside the new Brush Creek Building in Eagle.
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EAGLE ” Regulars at the Brush Creek Saloon will belly up to their favorite old, new bar in Eagle, Colorado on Friday.

The landmark downtown Eagle saloon is reopening this weekend in its traditional location at Third and Broadway. It won’t be a big move for the bar, which has been operating at Second and Broadway since June of 2007. But after 20 months, the bar is housed in a brand-new building that pays homage to the structure’s long-time roots.

Brush Creek Building owner Wendy Sacks didn’t come to the decision to raze the 1898 building lightly.



“I had looked into renovation, but it was just a tired, old building,” says Sacks.

While Sacks needed a new structure to address 21st century uses, she also wanted to honor the building’s history. As a compromise, she opted to de-construct the historic building, salvaging wood and other materials for use in the new structure. As a result, the new Brush Creek Saloon’s dance floor, bathroom partitions and other decorative features are constructed from the timber salvaged from the 1898 building.

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“Once we started getting to the walls, we found old hand-hewn timber. There was a lot of beautiful old wood,” says Sacks.

What is missing from the new building are myriad upkeep issues that come hand-in-hand with a century-old structure.

“With the old building, I was getting phone calls at 8 in the morning on a Sunday from people saying that the plumbing was backed up,” says Sacks. She noted the new building is designed to be as maintenance-free as possible with its masonry exterior and its modern mechanical systems.



While the Brush Creek Saloon building is new, it’s the same old neighborhood bar it’s been for generations, Sacks says.

“The Brush Creek Saloon is more about the people than the place,” she says.

That includes people such as Fred Scheim, who is not only a bar customer but also one of the contractors at work on the new building. Scheim says he likes the new saloon’s Western theme and the familiar touches that remain from the former operation. Those touches include a special bar stool that honors the late Jose Rodriguez and the McIveen family mural painted by local artist Natalie de Stephano. The artwork decorates the new game area at the saloon.

The saloon is under the operation of brothers Hans and Vit Blanar and their respective wives, Petra and Dasha. The Blanars are excited about their new kitchen and the unique decor.

“This is one-of-a-kind. You don’t see this bar all around,” says Hans Blanar.

Sacks added that the Blanars traveled back to their native Czech Republic to find many of the items decorating the walls at the saloon.

“We are sort of calling it an Eastern/Western decor,” says Sacks.

The saloon has been closed this week while equipment was moved from its temporary home down the street to its new location. Sacks has a number of anxious customers excited to tip back their first brew at the saloon’s new digs.

“I’ve got to have it open for them by Friday,” Sacks said.

– Original building was the Woodman Hall, built in 1898.

– Building has housed the Woodman of the World lodge, a dry goods store, basketball court, automobile showroom, dance hall and a movie theater.

– Since 1968, a saloon has been on the main floor with offices and residences above.

– The new Brush Creek Building is 15,000 square feet on four levels.

– Basement includes nine storage units ” four for upstairs residences and five for lease or sale.

– Main floor houses the Brush Creek Saloon and a 750 square foot commercial space.

– Second floor office space can be divided into up to four separate areas, for sale or rent.

– Third floor features four for sale residential spaces, two two-bedroom units and two one-bedroom units.


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