Education Foundation’s Summer School of Rock provides important connections for kids | VailDaily.com

Education Foundation’s Summer School of Rock provides important connections for kids

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Instructors at the Summer School of Rock Camp use tactics such as meditation chanting in the musical key the kids will be learning that day and hula hoops to open the mind to both rhythm and doing more than one task at a time.
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If you go …

What: Summer School of Rock Camp.

When: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8, through Friday, Aug. 12.

Where: Little Beach Amphitheater, Minturn.

Cost: $220 for the week, need-based scholarships provided by Kaiser Permanente.

More information: A free performance by campers will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, Aug. 12. To register for the camp, visit www.efec.org. For more information, contact Molly Gallagher at 970-390-6310 or mollyg@efec.org.

AVON — The Education Foundation of Eagle County’s Summer School of Rock music day camp for children ages 8 to 12 will be held in Minturn at Little Beach Amphitheater Monday though Friday this week.

Each day, campers participate in three hours of music instruction, yoga, tone-infused meditation, hula hooping, art and collaboration. They will be visited by and have the opportunity to meet a variety of professional musicians who frequent the Vail Valley to perform. The camp culminates with a free concert that showcases their musical accomplishments. Each child receives a lunch box, T-shirt, ukulele and music notebook.

Elements of Healthy Lifestyle

Led by Jake Wolf, longtime local musician and Grammy nominee for Music Education, the camp is an important aspect of the overall health and wellness within our community.

“At Kaiser Permanente, we believe in total health — mind, body and spirit — and know music and the arts are essential for leading healthy lifestyles,” said Susan Fairweather, community relations lead for Kaiser Permanente Colorado. “We’re excited to sponsor this event because it aligns well with what our organization is trying to achieve: better health for our members and the community we serve here in Eagle County.”

Wolf reiterated this notion of health from his own experience as a music teacher at Avon Elementary School. Kids who were struggling with standardized testing, producing some of the lowest scores in the district, improved almost immediately when he came in to teach the program after the school had lost funding for music.

“When I started teaching music at Avon Elementary, the kids were 17 percent proficient across the board, and five years later, their aptitude went from 17 to 73 percent,” Wolf said. “I attribute much of this growth to music education. When kids are learning how to read music, they are learning math. I think music bridges a huge gap in learning for many kids. Standardized testing leaves out creativity. Kids learn in different ways. Music and the arts tap into those other ways of learning, engaging the brain differently.”

Based on well-studied theories, Wolf and his camp collaborators have designed the weeklong session to engage different parts of the child’s brain. Instructors use tactics such as meditation chanting in the musical key the kids will be learning that day; hula hoops to open the mind to both rhythm and doing more than one task at a time; yoga; and affirmations to encourage kids in positive feedback since they will all be learning new things and some will pick it up faster than others.