Ha! | VailDaily.com
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Ha!

Andrew Harley
Summit Daily/Kristin Skvorc
ALL |

Talent, a wickedly hilarious screenplay and auteur (director, screenwriter, actor – all-around cinema guru) Kevin Smith’s exponentially larger budget turned “Clerks II” into a worthy sequel with more stimulus, color, dynamic scenes and taboo challenges than the original.Actually, this may be a trilogy considering the fact of “Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back.” And that’s hinted at through the constant insults exchanged between a hardcore Star Wars fan, Randal, and Lord Of The Rings diehard, Elias.Muffled and muted giggles and chuckles sizzled in the chests and throats of the 20-some people at the movie as the characters covered the gamut of sexual subjects, often popping the crowd into wild, teary-eyed laughter from the raunchy fun.After some casual opening scenes, we are greeted by “The New and Improved Jay and Silent Bob,” and, as usual, the herb-dealing duo got the audience high on wacky side plots and silly antics. They have taken a new angle: “Drug dealers with the power of Christ.”Smith makes his long-running themes more than present with the constant dialogue on Christianity, the central subject of sex and relationships and the general controversiality of the mise-en-scene (breaking out the adopted French, which refers to everything that is on the screen).I will warn everyone that the lewdness approaches the borders of pornography when Jason Lee makes his token appearance at Mooby’s (the fast-food restaurant the clerks work at) as a dotcom beneficiary, when the donkey arrives and the film features a series of dances by Jay (Silent Bob’s on the boombox for these scenes), and as the film progresses, Jay’s performances become more … revealing.The film has the one of the best comedy dance numbers of all time – set to the Jackson 5’s “ABC.” The film can also boast one of the the most disturbing and creative dramatic backgrounds for a “profession of love” scene that I can recall.Though he feels like “some burger-peddling loser,” Dante, the protagonist, is an enviable fellow – he is surrounded by friends, and two gorgeous women who want to spend their lives with him – the decisions he is faced with by these two lovely lovers drive the bulk of the plot.If you like to laugh at witty dialogue and creative cinematography centered on some of the most socially volatile subject matter (the unspoken agreement Smith makes with his audiences is that everyone will be offended at some point during his films, so expect it and get over it), then this film will turn you into a school child again, bursting at the seams with most of the other kids as the teacher lectures about beavers and woodpeckers.Vail, Colorado


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