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News Briefs: Eagle medical clinic

Daily Staff Report
Kathy Heicher/Enterprise After six years of planning, officials from Vail Valley Medical Center and Valley View Hopsital broke ground on a clinic in Eagle.
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EAGLE ” Forty years ago this month, the downvalley community was celebrating the opening of the Eagle Valley Medical Clinic. The community raised the funds ” about $30,000 for construction of the modest brick structure, which was built largely with volunteer labor.

The community was thrilled.

The same measure of pride and enthusiasm marked the ceremonial groundbreaking for the new Eagle Health Care Center in Eagle this week. When completed, the phased project will eventually include 175,000 square feet of medical office buildings, a hospital facility and an assisted-living complex. The first phase will be a 34,000-square-foot medical office building.

The project is located in the Eagle Ranch subdivision, on 14 acres of land on Sylvan Lake Road, and west of the commercial area.

The health care campus, which has an estimated price tag of $8 million, is the result of cooperation between Vail Valley Medical Center in Vail and Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs. Eagle and East West Partners, which built Eagle Ranch and donated the land, also helped to bring the project about.

“This day has been long in coming. The residents of western Eagle County deserve to have a really first-class medical facility in their backyard,” said Greg Repetti, chief executive officer of the Vail Valley Medical Center.

The first medical office building should be completed a year from now. If plans for the second phase of construction proceed, the hospital facility could be open by the fall of 2008. Plans for the assisted-living component of the campus are more distant.

” Kathy Heicher

VAIL ” Former Colorado governor Richard Lamm deals with the controversial subjects of immigration and the country’s racial divide, in his new book ” Two Wands, One Nation: An Essay on Race and Community in America.”

He will discuss his ideas in a talk at 7 p.m., Monday, at Donovan Pavilion in Vail.

In his book, Lamm says minorities should take partial responsibility for their destiny and strive to overcome the growing economic, educational, and employment gaps in our society. Lamm says certain groups have excelled against the odds because of their education-oriented, self-empowering cultures.

“America’s future and unity as a nation are at risk because of our reluctance to talk honestly and candidly about race and ethnicity,” Lamm says. “We have been intimidated too long by the very real fear of being charged with racism.”

Lamm, a Democrat, was governor from 1975-1987. He is co-director of the Institute for Public Policy Studies at the University of Denver. He also has been a civil rights attorney.

Admission to Monday’s talk is $10. For reservations contact the Vail Symposium at 476-0954. For more information, e-mail info@vailsymposium.org or visit http://www.vailsymposium.org.

VAIL ” The Vail Valley Foundation is its first annual membership drive Tuesday evening at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, prior to the Bud Light Hot Summer Nights free concert by Big Bad Voodoo Daddy.

Those interested in joining the Vail Valley Foundation can attend a pre-concert reception, beginning at 4:30 p.m. Membership levels start as low as just $25.

“The vast majority of residents and guests in this community enjoy at least one of the foundation’s programs each year,” said Patrice Ringler, Vail Valley Foundation’s assistant director of development. “Whether it’s a free concert like Bud Light Hot Summer Nights, the Birds of Prey World Cup races or the Vail International Dance Festival.

“A number of families throughout our valley are also directly benefiting from the educational programs funded by the foundation,” she said. “This is an opportunity for people to have a direct impact on all of our efforts.”

Additional foundation initiatives include the Honda Session invitational snowboard competition, the Countrywide American Ski Classic, the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater and Vilar Center for the Arts, Bud Light Street Beat and American National Bank ShowDown Town free concert series, the AEI World Forum and the Success at Six and Destination Discovery early learning educational programs.

For more information on the Vail Valley Foundation Membership Drive, contact Ashley Magnuson at 949-1999 or visit http://www.vvf.org.

EAGLE COUNTY ” The Vail Valley Rotary is sponsoring a motorcycle ride fundraiser to benefit Meet the Wilderness on July 30.

Riders will meet at the Colorado Mountain College parking lot in Edwards at 9 a.m. Riders will leave at 9:30 a.m. for Leadville and then go over Independence Pass and into Aspen. After lunch in Aspen, participants will continue through Glenwood Springs and return to Edwards. Maps will be provided.

A $50 donation is suggested for each motorcycle participating in the ride.

Meet the Wilderness is a local nonprofit organization that takes at-risk and other young people on camping and hiking trips.

For more information and to register for the Vail Valley Rotary Independence Pass Motorcycle Fundraiser event, send an e-mail to independencepass@gmail.com.

Vail Daily, Vail, Colorado


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