Nine-year veteran Michelle Metteer will take over as Minturn town manager on Jan. 1 | VailDaily.com

Nine-year veteran Michelle Metteer will take over as Minturn town manager on Jan. 1

Willy Powell, who has worked as Minturn Town Manager for the past three years, points to his successor, Michelle Metteer. The town of Minturn made the announcment this week that Metteer will take over the job Jan. 1.

MINTURN — When she started work for the town of Minturn nine years ago, Michelle Metteer didn't know her new job in the small town would offer great career advancement opportunities.

But that's exactly what has happened. Beginning Monday, Jan. 1, Metteer will take over as Minturn's new town manager.

A native of the West Coast, Metteer arrived in Minturn in 2009, when she became the deputy town clerk. She has since served as the town's economic development director and the manager of the Minturn Market. Most recently, she has been the assistant town manager in Minturn.

"I enjoy leadership and collaboration," Metteer said. "Everything that Minturn does is in collaboration because we are so small. We have lots of partners."

'Seamless transition'

Metteer will succeed Willy Powell in the town manager job. Powell has served as town manager in Minturn for three years, following his retirement as Eagle Town Manager, a job he held for more than two decades. Powell will assist with the transition and continue to work part time with Metteer.

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"I am incredibly fortunate that Willy is willing to stay on for one year, working one day a week as a consultant," Metteer said. "He has been an incredible asset for this town."

"While we are sad to let Willy finally fulfill his promise of retirement, we are fortunate to have the seamless transition for Minturn," Mayor Matt Scherr said. "We are thrilled to have Michelle fill this role because she is so well respected and familiar with Minturn."

Doing a lot with a little

As town manager, Metteer will oversee a compact town operation. Minturn only has nine employees, but Metteer noted the town provides lots of services with its small staff.

She also pointed to a couple of big issues on Minturn's horizon — the Bolt's Ditch legislation and the proposed Battle Mountain residential project.

The ditch legislation would recreate a historic reservoir, which was three times as large as Nottingham Lake, south of town near the entrance to Tigiwon Road. The reservoir was drained in the 1990s, but Minturn has launched a congressional process to recreate the amenity.

The Battle Mountain project proposes 200 units, which represents sizeable residential development in the community.

In preparation for her new job, Metteer has taken leadership classes through the Vail Centre and water-fluency classes through the state of Colorado.

"Water in Colorado is everything, and it is nothing short of incredibly complex," she said.

Beyond the big-picture items, Metteer said her new job gives her the opportunity to help the town of Minturn serve its residents. That's where her heart lies.

"Minturn is great because it is such a small town and the steps you take here can really make a difference for people," Metteer concluded.