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Daily Staff ReportVail, Co, Colorado

WILD HOGSBiker buddies Tim Allen, John Travolta, Martin Lawrence and William H. Macy are not all that wild, and more importantly, not all that funny. The road romp from director Walt Becker is like his “National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” on Maalox, the humor and hijinks tame and tranquil as though it were a middle-aged epilogue to that raunchy campus comedy. The filmmakers simply fashion an excuse to send their weekend motorcyclists onto a cross-country road trip, then string together uninspired encounters with some fellow travelers and a hardcore biker gang headed by Ray Liotta, whose enthusiastic bad-boy performance is wasted in a woefully underwritten role. Marisa Tomei, Jill Hennessy and Tichina Arnold barely register as wives or lovers of our heroes. Most of the jokes and gags are boring or outright annoying, but the movie does have a surprise guest appearance that will amuse biker-film fans. PG-13 for crude and sexual content and some violence. 99 min. Two stars out of four.- David Germain, AP Movie WriterPREMONITIONSandra Bullock plays a woman with a seemingly perfect life until she gets a vision from the future that says her husband (Julian McMahon) will die in a car wreck. With Nia Long, Kate Nelligan, Amber Valletta and Peter Stormare. Written by Bill Kelly. Directed by Mennan Yapo. PG-13 for some violent content, disturbing images, thematic material and brief language.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News Service

MEET THE ROBINSONS A lonely orphan travels to the future, where he meets the odd Robinson family, which needs his help to survive. With the voices of Angela Bassett, Tom Selleck, Harland Williams, Laurie Metcalf, Adam West, Ethan Sandler and Tom Kenny. Screenplay by Michelle Bochner, based on the book by William Joyce. Directed by Steve Anderson. G.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News ServiceWILD HOGSBiker buddies Tim Allen, John Travolta, Martin Lawrence and William H. Macy are not all that wild, and more importantly, not all that funny. The road romp from director Walt Becker is like his “National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” on Maalox, the humor and hijinks tame and tranquil as though it were a middle-aged epilogue to that raunchy campus comedy. The filmmakers simply fashion an excuse to send their weekend motorcyclists onto a cross-country road trip, then string together uninspired encounters with some fellow travelers and a hardcore biker gang headed by Ray Liotta, whose enthusiastic bad-boy performance is wasted in a woefully underwritten role. Marisa Tomei, Jill Hennessy and Tichina Arnold barely register as wives or lovers of our heroes. Most of the jokes and gags are boring or outright annoying, but the movie does have a surprise guest appearance that will amuse biker-film fans. PG-13 for crude and sexual content and some violence. 99 min. Two stars out of four.- David Germain, AP Movie WriterBLADES OF GLORYBased on the number of prominent cameos by figure skating royalty in this pas de deux comedy, the world of toe loops, double axels and triple Lutzes has a pretty good sense of humor about itself. And that’s a good thing because the movie, which stars Will Ferrell and Jon Heder as rival skaters forced to restart their careers as the first male-male pairs team, leaves no sacred cow or Salchow untipped. “Blades” is a hysterical parody as long as bodies are in motion, nailing the compulsories of a sport ripe for caricature, but it skates on thinner ice outside the rink. Whatever combination of choreography, camera trickery and special effects were required to render the over-the-top, hyper-real skate numbers, they’re executed with wit and ingenuity. (1:33) PG-13 for crude and sexual humor, language, a comic violent image and some drug references.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News ServiceREIGN OVER MEAdam Sandler and Don Cheadle play former college roommates who run into each other by chance and rekindle their friendship, providing aid through trying moments in both men’s lives. With Liv Tyler, Saffron Burrows and Donald Sutherland. Written and directed by Mike Binder. R for language and some sexual references.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News ServiceTHE LAST MIMZYMimzy is the name of a beat-up stuffed rabbit two children find in a mysterious box of toy-like objects. As they play with the toys, they begin to get smarter, but bizarre things start to happen. With Timothy Hutton, Joely Richardson and Rainn Wilson. Based on the short story by Lewis Padgett. Directed by Bob Shaye. PG for some thematic elements, mild peril and language.SHOOTEROne of those elevated B pictures that runs type across the bottom of the screen to identify cities, this film has its pro forma, paint-by-numbers elements, but it is executed with such efficiency and energy by action maestro Antoine Fuqua (“Training Day”) that ignoring flaws and being involved in the proceedings isn’t always a matter of choice. Best of all is star Mark Wahlberg as the heroic loner, a former Army sniper who is double-crossed during a presidential assassination attempt and framed for the crime, forced to do unequal battle for justice against phenomenal odds. (2:06) R for strong graphic violence and some language.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News Service

MEET THE ROBINSONS A lonely orphan travels to the future, where he meets the odd Robinson family, which needs his help to survive. With the voices of Angela Bassett, Tom Selleck, Harland Williams, Laurie Metcalf, Adam West, Ethan Sandler and Tom Kenny. Screenplay by Michelle Bochner, based on the book by William Joyce. Directed by Steve Anderson. G.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News Service300Another adaptation of a Frank Miller graphic novel in the vein of “Sin City,” although this one recounts the ancient Battle of Thermopylae, with King Leonidas (Gerard Butler) and 300 Spartans holding off Xerxes and his giant Persian army. This stylish piece of comic-book mythologizing is one of those films you don’t want to think too hard about. “300” is, at least in the short run, something to see, but unless you love violence as much as a Spartan, Quentin Tarantino or a video game-playing teenage boy, you will not be endlessly fascinated. With Lena Headey, David Wenham and Dominic West. (1:57) R for graphic battle sequences throughout, some sexuality and nudity.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News ServiceARE WE DONE YET?Ice Cube follows up the family vacation with a remake of “Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House” in which a “fixer-upper” home in the country becomes a never-ending money pit for an urban family. With Nia Long, John C. McGinley, Aleisha Allen and Philip Daniel Bolden. Screenplay by Robert Ramsey, Matthew Stone, J. David Stern and David N. Weiss. Directed by Steve Carr. PG for some innuendos and brief language.- L.A. Times-Washington Post News ServiceFIREHOUSE DOGA family movie about a boy and his dog that save a troubled fire station. With Josh Hutcherson, Bruce Greenwood, Bree Turner, Dash Mihok, Steven Culp. PG for sequences of action peril, some mild crude humor and language. – L.A. Times-Washington Post News Service


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