Plain As Dirt: Let’s talk about something else | VailDaily.com
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Plain As Dirt: Let’s talk about something else

Tom Glass, Vail, CO Colorado

It’s November, and we all have an eye out for snow.

Are you thinking about gardening?

If you are, you are in serious need of help ” plant therapy ” 8 hours of rerun Martha Stewart while on a plane to the Aalsmeer potted plant auction.



Like most of us entering winter dormancy, I’m thinking snow. My idea of gardening right now is to stake the driveway, maybe ponder the deleterious effects of ice melt piled on three lilacs and a volunteer aspen as I buy five bags of the pellets in defense of my arse.

You know what’s amazing about snow? We really have nowhere to store it. We haul the majority of it that needs to be hauled pretty much out of the valley.



A lot of snow needs hauling. It is an expensive proposition.

There are homes, condos, apartment complexes and businesses here that have nowhere to store what they scrape off driveways, walks and roofs. So, they have it loaded up and hauled to a snow dump. Seems reasonable. Which it is, if you pay as much thought to it as our municipal planners have. But, if you do happen to think about it, our lack of snow storage is ludicrous. An absolute whiteout in foresight.

You’d think snow would be pretty easy to store. It’s takes up space temporarily, and, since it falls out of the sky like manna from heaven, pretty pure.



Unfortunately, combine temporary and not so pure, pile it all into one spot, and you create a distillery for everything we allow to hit the ground. It’s a dirty, gritty, greasy, litter-strewn problem better left out of sight ” and out mind.

We must be out of our minds.

We’re paying a fortune in fuel, labor and dumping fees to haul an inevitability to real estate we think so little of that we’re willing to make it a squalid spot.

Well, now that I’ve pointed out the problem, I’m going to go finish up this greenhouse I’m building. I’ve been having such a good time, I’ve kind of ignored the realities of winter.


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