Psychedelic mushrooms just put Denver at the center of the national drug debate — again | VailDaily.com

Psychedelic mushrooms just put Denver at the center of the national drug debate — again

Andrew Kenney
The Denver Post
Even if voters decriminalize mushrooms, it would remain illegal to buy, sell and possess the drug.
Photo by Marcus Loke on Unsplash

Denver is at the forefront of America’s next drug reform movement — again.

Thousands of residents have signed on in an effort to loosen restrictions on psilocybin mushrooms. In three months, a question about decriminalizing the psychedelic drug will appear on the city’s elections ballots alongside the mayoral election and more mundane affairs.

The campaigners behind the Decriminalize Denver measure already have made history: This is the first time U.S. voters will consider giving a second chance to the drug, which was the subject of great scientific interest before its reputation was annihilated in the 1970s.

Now, the measure has raised the same fear and excitement as the marijuana liberalization effort: Will it cement the city’s reputation as a mecca for drugs, effective progressive policies, or both?

“People from all over the world are getting in touch with us,” said Kevin Matthews, the 33-year-old, stay-at-home dad who is managing the campaign. “That’s what’s exciting about this: The fact that this is getting international attention, very positive attention, I think speaks to the movement overall.”



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