Real estate the story in Jackson Hole | VailDaily.com
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Real estate the story in Jackson Hole

Allen BestVail, CO Colorado

JACKSON HOLE, Wyo. Real estate continues to become an ever bigger part of the story in Jackson Hole, even if the real estate being sold isnt in Jackson Hole proper. The action, reports columnist Jonathan Schechter, has moved out to the exurbs in adjoining Lincoln County but even more so on the west side of the Teton Range, in Idaho. The Multiple Listing Service of residential properties during the last two years has expanded by a third, from 1,800 to 2,700 properties, reports Schechter. But while the number of listings in Jackson Hole itself has dropped, the number of listings in Teton County, Idaho, has increased 64 percent.Schechter also notes that this shift has become glaringly apparent in the advertising found in the Jackson Hole News&Guide. Not only is real estate advertising becoming more dominant, but particularly so for real estate outside Jackson Hole.It is to the point that in Jackson, real estate is dominating the valleys economy. Today, he says, real estate and development are to the greater Teton area what entertainment is to Hollywood or finance is to New York.He sees the real estate market continuing to thrive, even as wildlife habitat, economic diversity and small-town atmosphere suffer.

REVELSTOKE, B.C. Mountain towns are deathly afraid of growing up to become like well, in Colorado, the usual citations are Aspen and Vail, although Steamboat, Summit County, and even Crested Butte crop up. In British Columbia, between Banff and Whistler, Revelstoke is shaking the dust off its blue-collar boots as it primps itself for the big league of mountain resorts. In an editorial, the Times Review insists that the future can be guided. But in his ruminations about burying a 100-year time capsule, editor David Rooney sounds less sanguine.Will it still be friendly, rural community of people who work hard and who love their mountains and forests intensely? Or will it have evolved into something like Banff or Whistler brittle and largely artificial communities that focus on parting tourists from their dollars.In Jackson Hole, Paul Cook sees little to like in the changes of the last 30 years. A neo-environmentalism prevails, he says, that is mostly intent on elevating property values. The result is a more stratified community, with various groups having little interaction. So now we have created a critical rich people habitat where rich people are a dime a dozen, writes in the Jackson Hole News&Guide. Its good hired hands, he adds, are hard to find.


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