Some Britsh troops to leave Iraq, BBC says | VailDaily.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Some Britsh troops to leave Iraq, BBC says

AP PhotoChildren stand amid debris in front of a car parts shop after a fuel truck exploded in Taji, about 12 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday. One person died.
ALL |

LONDON – Prime Minister Tony Blair will announce on Wednesday a new timetable for the withdrawal of British troops from Iraq, with 1,500 to return home in several weeks, the BBC reported.

Blair will also tell the House of Commons during his regular weekly appearance that a total of about 3,000 British soldiers will have left southern Iraq by the end of 2007, if the security there is sufficient, the British Broadcasting Corp. said, quoting government officials who weren’t further identified.

The announcement comes even as President Bush implements a surge of 21,000 more troops for Iraq.



But Blair said Sunday that Washington had not put pressure on London to maintain its troop numbers. The BBC said Blair was not expected to say when the rest of Britain’s forces would leave Iraq. Britain currently has about 7,100 soldiers there.

Blair’s Downing Street office refused to comment on the BBC report.



Blair said last month that he would report to lawmakers on his future strategy in Iraq following the completion of Operation Sinbad, a joint British and Iraqi mission targeting police corruption and militia influence in the southern city of Basra.

On Sunday, Blair told the BBC that the operation was completed.

Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett said in January that Operation Sinbad offered the prospect of a “turning point for Iraq, hopefully in the near future.”



Treasury chief Gordon Brown, who is likely to succeed Blair by September, has said he hoped several thousand British soldiers would be withdrawn by December.

As recently as late last month, Blair rejected opposition calls to withdrawal British troops by October, calling such a plan irresponsible.

“That would send the most disastrous signal to the people that we are fighting in Iraq. It’s a policy that, whatever its superficial attractions may be, is actually deeply irresponsible,” Blair said on Jan. 24 in the House of Commons.

Blair, who has said he will step down as prime minister by September after a decade in power, has seen his foreign-policy record overshadowed by his role as Bush’s leading ally in the unpopular war.


Support Local Journalism