Spring break marijuana 101 for Vail and Beaver Creek | VailDaily.com
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Spring break marijuana 101 for Vail and Beaver Creek

Those looking to toke up are set up for disappointment unless they have private property. The vast majority of hotels are nonsmoking, and Beaver Creek and Vail mountains are on U.S. Forest Service land, so no safety meetings allowed on the hill.
Nick Young | Daily file photo |

Need to know:

Smoking marijuana is illegal on U.S. Forest Service property (Vail and Beaver Creek mountains) as well as in public (Bridge Street). The only way to smoke pot legally is on private property.

Editor’s note: Marijuana is still illegal under federal law, despite being legal in the state of Colorado.

Some spring-breakers are seeking that Rocky Mountain high during their time off from school, but those trying to blaze the legal bud should educate themselves before lighting up.

It has been more than two years since Amendment 64 went into effect in Colorado, and there are currently almost 10 shops for those 21 and older to legally buy marijuana in Eagle County — none of them being in Vail.



“Anything that brings visitors to Colorado is a good thing,” said Craig Bettis, Vail Police Department commander. “For us in law enforcement, the concern becomes proper use, legally and safely.”

❝Vail Resorts has a zero tolerance policy toward skiing or riding under the influence. We do work with local law enforcement and the U.S. Forest Service to enforce the law and will pull passes from those who are not complying with the law.❞Vail Resorts statement

THE LAWS



Marijuana consumption is much like alcohol consumption — you can’t drive while high, and you can’t drive drunk; you can’t smoke in public just like you can’t walk down Bridge Street with a beer; and you must be at least 21 years of age.

And, yes, Beaver Creek and Vail mountains are on U.S. Forest Service land, so no safety meetings allowed on the hill.

“Vail Resorts has a zero-tolerance policy toward skiing or riding under the influence,” read a statement by Vail Resorts. “We do work with local law enforcement and the U.S. Forest Service to enforce the law and will pull passes from those who are not complying with the law.”



So you’re not allowed to smoke on Bridge Street, you’re not allowed to smoke on the mountain, maybe the hotel?

“The hotel for many, many years has been completely nonsmoking with any type of tobacco or marijuana,” said Tom Puntel, director of sales, marketing and events at the Park Hyatt at Beaver Creek. “So, the hotel just hasn’t needed to change any policy because we’re just a nonsmoking facility anyways.”

Those looking to toke up are set up for disappointment unless they have private property. But it’s 2016, there’s no need for smoking when there’s edibles, right?

From chocolate bars to gummy candies to tasty drinks, marijuana intake varies and can taste delicious, but be wary of the dosage.

“The well-documented risks are, especially when you go to the edibles, is sometimes the absorption is variable,” said Jason Moore, Ph.D., PA, of the Vail Valley Medical Center. “It can hit people harder than they think it’s going to, or the time is variable.

“Anytime you take a drug of any kind, the same rules apply: Start slow and go slow.”

Reporter Ross Leonhart can be reached at 970-748-2915 and rleonhart@vaildaily.com. Follow him on Instagram at colorado_livin_on_the_hill.


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