Story wins local ski writer presitgious award | VailDaily.com
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Story wins local ski writer presitgious award

Daily Staff Report
Special to the DailyScott Willoughby
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Scott Willoughby’s “Jib Nation” story was one of two recipients of this year’s Lowell Thomas Award, given out by Colorado Ski Country USA, the state ski industry’s main advocacy organization.

The award recognizes journalists whom the organization deems to have excelled in the areas of print and broadcast coverage of Colorado skiing and snowboarding. According to Colorado Ski Country USA, Willoughby’s article, which originally ran in the Denver Post in January, provided a “cultural context” for the next generation of skiers and snowboarders. It also gave readers an important look at the future of skoing and snowboaring, the organization said.

Willoughby, who lives in Minturn, began his career at the Washington Post writing outdoor adventure stories. He came to Vail in 1992 where he worked for the Vail Trail newspaper before embarking on a full-time freelance career and then the ski and snowboard columnist for The Denver Post in 1995. Willoughby’s work has also appeared in National Geographic Adventure, Men’s Journal, Outside, Newsweek, SKI, Skiing, Warren Miller’s SnoWorld and numerous other national and regional publications.



Jib Nation glossary

Jib Nation – the growing legion of skiers and snowboarders devoted to New School freestyle tricks including, but not limited to, the “360 Toxic” and “Stale Fish.”



New School – antithesis of Old School. Exclusionary of all tricks of the “Daffy-Twister-Spread Eagle” era of freestyle skiing. Jibbing.

Jib – freestyle tricks. See “new school.”

Jibber – one who jibs.



Freeskiing – jibbing on skis. See “new school.”

Toxic – a ski “grab” denoted by hand placement on the rear-inside edge of crossed skis. All grabs have similarly formal titles (e.g., Stale Fish or “Stale”).

Terrain Park – the area of a mountain dedicated to jibbing through a series of tabletops, rails, funboxes, halfpipes and quarterpipes.

Halfpipe – A snow structure originally built for freestyle snowboarding consisting of opposing radial transition walls of the same height and size utilized to “catch air” and perform tricks by traveling back and forth from wall to wall while moving down the fall line. (Snow shaped like the bottom of a round pipe cut in half.)

Super Pipe – a halfpipe on steroids, typically a minimum of 400 feet long with walls 15 feet tall.

Sick – An expression used to describe something really exceptional: clothing, a trick, a run, etc. See “Super Pipe.”

Tabletop – a large mound of snow built in the form of a jump or “kicker” with a flat top of varying length and ramps for take-off and landing at either end. Also “table.”

Big Air – achieved by jibbers when tables are properly utilized. Also a specific New School discipline of competition.

Rails – steel bars similar to railroad tracks or staircase railings used by jibbers to perform technical sliding tricks. A specific discipline of competition.

Ginormous – Gigantically enormous. See “sick.”

Yurt – a Mongolian teepee now used atop halfpipes to house PlayStation, stereos and Mountain Dew vending machines.

Quarterpipe – a halfpipe cut in half, i.e. sans opposing radial transition wall.

Funbox – a snow structure built in the form of a box on which jibbers are expected to have fun.

Booters – big air kickers.

Butter – exceptionally smooth or impressive run. E.g., “You totally buttered that last booter, bro.”


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