‘The Breach’ screens in Avon, Eagle as part of Sustainable Community Film Series | VailDaily.com

‘The Breach’ screens in Avon, Eagle as part of Sustainable Community Film Series

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As “The Breach” explains, a loss of wild Alaskan salmon would starve their environment (including other wildlife) of an essential food and fertilizer, harm local people’s health and pocketbooks and deprive America and the world of a uniquely healthful, fully sustainable food.
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If you go …

What: “The Breach,” part of the Sustainable Community Film Series.

When/Where: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Loaded Joe’s in Avon and 6:30 p.m. Dec. 15 at The Dusty Boot in Eagle

Cost: $5 suggested donation.

More information: Email melissak@walkingmountains.org.

What do Chinook, Coho, sockeye, humpy and chum all have in common? All five are species of salmon that thrive in the North Pacific waters of the United States and Canada.

Salmon is considered a keystone species, meaning there are many other creatures that rely on them. In fact, there are 137 creatures, to be exact. Simply put, the salmon migration during spawning season helps replenish and maintain entire ecosystems, from the animals that eat the salmon to the decomposers who break down their dead bodies to the trees that grow from their broken down nutrients.

These are all very important components for maintaining a diverse and healthy ecosystem. With declines in salmon populations, many coastal ecosystems are suffering, as well. The Sustainable Community Film Series — a project of Walking Mountains Science Center — continues this month with two screenings of “The Breach,” which highlights the problem of declining salmon populations. The first takes place at Loaded Joe’s in Avon on Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. and the second at the Dusty Boot in Eagle on Dec. 15 at 6:30 p.m.

When Seattle-based filmmaker and former fishing guide Mark Titus learns why wild salmon populations are plummeting in his native Pacific Northwest, he embarks on a journey to discover where the fish have gone and what might bring them back. What he reveals is a pattern of destruction that threatens the most sustainable wild food left on the planet.

Titus takes us on a trip along the Pacific Coast, where wild salmon have almost disappeared due to mining, dams, salmon farming, river pollution and introduction of hatchery-bred species. Along the way, he makes stops on the Elwha River in Washington state, British Columbia’s Broughton Archipelago and Alaska’s Tongass National Forest and Bristol Bay to share stories of potential disaster to the wild species.

Most of the world’s remaining wild salmon come from rivers in Alaska, Canada or Kamchatka (Russia’s Northeast Pacific island) … but Alaska hosts the biggest and most productive salmon runs on the planet. One half of the world’s sockeye salmon come from Bristol Bay, Alaska.

Starving Alaska’s Environment

As “The Breach” explains, a loss of wild Alaskan salmon would starve their environment (including other wildlife) of an essential food and fertilizer, harm local people’s health and pocketbooks and deprive America and the world of a uniquely healthful, fully sustainable food.

One may ask, “Is there a breach of contract between human beings and nature — specifically wild salmon — and do we have a shot at repairing things and learning from past mistakes in order to sustain future generations?”

Joining Walking Mountains this month at both screenings is Kaleb’s Katch, a local sustainable seafood business that will be serving up salmon appetizers and raffling off items such as delicious salmon, books and hats. All raffle ticket sales will go toward the Bristol Bay Association. Kaleb Walker, owner of Katch, was a commercial fisherman on the Sound and Fury for Capt. Robert Lebovic for five seasons in the Bristol Bay. He and his crew will be there to talk about the beauty of Bristol Bay and share information on threats to the wild salmon.

To view the entire lineup of the Sustainable Community Film Series, visit http://www.walkingmountains.org/films and for more information about this film, visit http://www.the breachfilm.com.