Three-quarters of Colorado foster kids aren’t graduating on time | VailDaily.com

Three-quarters of Colorado foster kids aren’t graduating on time

Officials say rides to school would help

Jennifer Brown
The Denver Post
photo - National Adoption Day celebrated in many of Colorado's judicial districts

Rebeka Romero cries as she gets hugs from her sons Joseph, 8, left, and Travis, 10 right, after their adoption was finalized in courtroom 2A at the Lindsey-Flanigan Courthouse at 520 West Colfax Ave on Nov. 16, 2017 in Denver. Rebeka and her husband Travis have fostered Travis and Joseph and their younger sister Lilly, 4, hidden behind the three, for 22 months bringing them back together as a family unit. The Romeros have two other foster children they plan on adopting.

The education outcomes for foster kids in Colorado are grim and getting worse: Just 23 percent graduated from high school on time last year.

And that's even worse than in 2016, when the four-year graduation rate for foster youths was 33 percent.

Among the reasons, experts and former foster kids testified Tuesday at the state Capitol, is that the majority of them change schools multiple times while they're in care, losing ground academically each time. Of the about 6,500 children in Colorado's foster system last year, 55 percent changed schools at least once during the school year.

Usually, the reason that foster children change schools is they're moved to a new foster home, group home or residential treatment center, often in another county or school district. Legislation under consideration by Colorado lawmakers would require school districts and county child welfare departments to arrange and fund transportation to a child's "school of origin" or the school they are attending when they're moved to a new placement.

Read the complete article from The Denver Post.