Top 10 reads | VailDaily.com

Top 10 reads

Daily Staff Report

The Bookworm of Edwards1. “Kite Runner,” by Khaled Hosseini: An epic tale of fathers and sons, of friendship and betrayal, that takes us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the atrocities of the present. The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption, and it is also about the power of fathers over sons-their love, their sacrifices, their lies. 2. “Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books,” by Azar Nafisi: For two years before Azar Nafisi left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and discuss forbidden works of Western literature. They were shy and uncomfortable at first, unaccustomed to being asked to speak their minds, but soon they began to open up and to speak more freely, not only about the novels they were reading but also about themselves, their dreams and disappointments. 3. “The Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: A trail guide to the back country around Vail, Beaver Creek, Avon, Eagle and Minturn, including all of alpine Eagle County. Forty trails with key statistics such as elevation gain and degree of difficulty are included. 4. “Queen’s Fool,” by Philippa Gregory: A young woman caught in the rivalry between Queen Mary and her half sister, Elizabeth, must find her true destiny amid treason, poisonous rivalries, loss of faith, and unrequited love. 5. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: When Mary Boleyn comes to court as an innocent girl of 14, she catches the eye of Henry VIII. Dazzled by the king, Mary falls in love with both her golden prince and her growing role as unofficial queen. However, she soon realizes just how much she is a pawn in her family’s ambitious plots as the king’s interest begins to wane and she is forced to step aside for her best friend and rival: her sister, Anne.6. “Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic and Madness at the Fair That Changed America,” by Eric Larson: Bringing Chicago circa 1893 to vivid life, Erik Larson’s spellbinding bestseller intertwines the true tale of two men – the brilliant architect behind the legendary 1893 World’s Fair, striving to secure America’s place in the world; and the cunning serial killer who used the fair to lure his victims to death. Combining meticulous research with nail-biting storytelling, Larson has crafted a narrative with all the wonder of newly discovered history and the thrills of the best fiction.7. “Five People You Meet in Heaven,” by Mitch Albom: Eddie is a wounded war veteran, an old man who has lived, in his mind, an uninspired life. His job is fixing rides at a seaside amusement park. On his 83rd birthday, a tragic accident kills him as he tries to save a little girl from a falling cart. He awakes in the afterlife, where he learns that heaven is not a destination. It’s a place where your life is explained to you by five people, some of whom you knew, others who may have been strangers. One by one, from childhood to soldier to old age, Eddie’s five people revisit their connections to him on earth, illuminating the mysteries of his “meaningless” life.8. “Rule of Four,” by Ian Caldwell: Princeton. Good Friday, 1999. On the eve of graduation, two students are a hairsbreadth from solving the mysteries of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Famous for its hypnotic power over those who study it, the five-hundred-year-old Hypnerotomachia may finally reveal its secrets – to Tom Sullivan, whose father was obsessed with the book, and Paul Harris, whose future depends on it. As the deadline looms, research has stalled — until an ancient diary surfaces. Armed with this final clue, the two friends delve into the bizarre world of the Hypnerotomachia – a world of forgotten erudition, strange sexual appetites, and terrible violence. 9. “Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim,” by David Sedaris: 10. “Piano Tuner,” by Daniel Philippe Mason: In 1886, a shy, middle-aged piano tuner named Edgar Drake receives an unusual commission from the British War Office: to travel to the remote jungles of northeast Burma and repair a rare piano belonging to an eccentric army surgeon who has proven mysteriously indispensable to the imperial design. Verbatim Booksellers1. “Guide to Colorado Wildflowers/Mountains,” by G.K. Guennel: One of the best wildflower guides published, this book is a great companion to “The Vail Hiker.”2. “Rule of Four,” by Ian Caldwell: Princeton. Good Friday, 1999. On the eve of graduation, two students are a hairsbreadth from solving the mysteries of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Famous for its hypnotic power over those who study it, the five-hundred-year-old Hypnerotomachia may finally reveal its secrets — to Tom Sullivan, whose father was obsessed with the book, and Paul Harris, whose future depends on it. As the deadline looms, research has stalled — until an ancient diary surfaces. Armed with this final clue, the two friends delve into the bizarre world of the Hypnerotomachia — a world of forgotten erudition, strange sexual appetites, and terrible violence. 3. “The Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: A trail guide to the back country around Vail, Beaver Creek, Avon, Eagle and Minturn, including all of alpine Eagle County. Forty trails with key statistics such as elevation gain and degree of difficulty are included. 4. “Kite Runner,” by Khaled Hosseini: An epic tale of fathers and sons, of friendship and betrayal, that takes us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the atrocities of the present. The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption, and it is also about the power of fathers over sons-their love, their sacrifices, their lies. 5. “Inventors of Vail,” by Dick Hauserman: The well-written story of the entrepreneurs that build Vail in the early sixties.6. “Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books,” by Azar Nafisi: For two years before Azar Nafisi left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and discuss forbidden works of Western literature. They were shy and uncomfortable at first, unaccustomed to being asked to speak their minds, but soon they began to open up and to speak more freely, not only about the novels they were reading but also about themselves, their dreams and disappointments. 7. “The Bourne Legacy,” by Eric Van Lustbader: Jason Bourne is known and feared in the deadly world of covert-ops as one of the most highly skilled assassins for hire. Bourne, however, was merely an identity assumed by CIA agent David Webb, a personality implanted by the CIA to facilitate a dangerous operation, but one that threatened to consume David Webb entirely. Webb is no longer an active CIA agent and is now a professor living a quiet life, far from the dangers of his previous life. Until, one day, he finds himself the target of an assassin nearly as skilled as himself and is framed for the brutal murder of his two closest associates and friends. Fighting for his life against unseen assailants, as well as the full resources of the CIA who believe he has gone dangerously rogue, the Bourne identity asserts itself, leaving Jason Bourne in control. Now Bourne must use all his skills to stay alive as he battles against a determined assassin and the combined skills of the world’s intelligence networks. 8. “Angels and Demons,” by Dan Brown: World-renowned Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is summoned to a Swiss research facility to analyze a cryptic symbol seared into the chest of a murdered physicist. What he discovers is unimaginable: a deadly vendetta against the Catholic Church by a centuries-old underground organization – the Illuminati. Desperate to save the Vatican from a powerful time bomb, Langdon joins forces in Rome with the beautiful and mysterious scientist Vittoria Vetra. Together they embark on a frantic hunt through sealed crypts, dangerous catacombs, deserted cathedrals, and the most secretive vault on earth … the long-forgotten Illuminati lair. 9. “Hidden Prey,” by John Sanford: On the shore of Lake Superior, a man named Vladimir Orslov is found shot dead, three holes in his head and heart, and though no one knows why, everybody has a theory. A Russian cop flies in from Moscow, Lucas Davenport flies in from Minneapolis, law enforcement and press types swarm the crime scene and, in the middle of it all, there is another murder. Is there a relationship between the two? Before he can find the answers, Davenport will have to follow a trail back to another place, another time, and battle the shadows he discovers there. 10. “Princes of Ireland,” by Edward Rutherfurd: The saga begins in tribal, pre-Christian Ireland during the reign of the fierce and mighty High Kings at Tara, with the tale of two lovers, the princely Conall and the ravishing Deirdre, whose travails cleverly echo the ancient Celtic legend of Cuchulainn. From that stirring beginning, Rutherfurd takes the reader on a powerfully-imagined journey through the centuries. Through the interlocking stories of a memorable cast of characters – druids and chieftains, monks and smugglers, noblewomen and farmwives, merchants and mercenaries, rebels and cowards – we see Ireland through the lens of its greatest city, Dublin.




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