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Top 10 reads

Wren Wertin

The Bookworm of Edwards Bestseller List

1. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cyptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

2. “Under the Banner of Heaven,” by Jon Krakauer: Krakauer shifts his focus from extremes of physical adventure to extremes of religious belief within our own borders. At the core of his book is an appalling double murder committed by two Mormon Fundamentalist brothers, Ron and Dan Lafferty, who insist they received a revelation from God commanding them to kill their blameless victims.



3. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

4. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.



5. “Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

6. “Because of Winn-Dixie,” by Kate Dicamillo: In a first novel recalling the fiction of Harper Lee and Carson McCullers, the narrator, ten-year-old Opal describes her first summer in the town of Naomi, Florida, and all the good things that happen because of her big, ugly dog, Winn-Dixie. A Newbery Honor Book now in paperback.

7. “Essential 55: An Award-Winning Educator’s Rules for Discovering the Successful Student in Every Child,” by Ron Clark: By helping students turn themselves into scholars, 2001 Disney Teacher of the Year, Clark found that his “Essential 55” lessons can apply to anyone who considers life to be a learning experience.



8. “Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

9. “Year of Wonders,” by Geraldine Brooks: When an infected bolt of cloth carries plague from London to an isolated village, a housemaid named Anna Frith emerges as an unlikely heroine and healer.

10. “A Thousand Days in Venice,” by Marlena Blasi: When Marlena de Blasi traveled to Italy, she expected to fall in love with the country, not to be swept away by a Venetian man. Filled with the foods and flavors of Italy, “A Thousand Days in Venice” is an enchanting story.

Verbatim Booksellers

1. “Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: An in depth guide to the trails of Eagle County, from easy to difficult.

2.-“Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cyptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

3. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

4. “In My Mother’s Closet,” by Eugenia Zuckerman: In her evocative new book, Eugenia Zukerman taps into the dynamic mother-daughter relationship and the special bond that belongs uniquely to mothers, daughters, sisters and girlfriends. Come share laughter, tears, insights, revelations, and loving resolutions as over forty accomplished women share memories of their mothers’ closets, where they tried on clothes, jewelry, and shoes–and imagined the world they would one day enter, the world of being a woman.

5.-“Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

6.-“Virgin Blue,” by Tracy Chevalier: Never before published in the United States, this first novel is released by the critically acclaimed author of “Girl with a Pearl Earring” and “Falling Angels.” Readers meet Ella Turner and Isabelle du Moulin–two women born centuries apart, yet bound by a fateful family legacy.

7.-“Bel Canto,” by Ann Patchett: When terrorists seize hostages at an embassy party, an unlikely assortment of people is thrown together, including American opera star Roxanne Coss and Mr. Hosokawa, a Japanese CEO and her biggest fan.

8. “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life, by Walter Isaacson: Benjamin Franklin is the Founding Father who winks at us. An ambitious urban entrepreneur who rose up the social ladder, from leather-aproned shopkeeper to dining with kings, he seems made of flesh rather than of marble. In bestselling author Walter Isaacson’s vivid and witty full-scale biography, we discover why Franklin seems to turn to us from history’s stage with eyes that twinkle from behind his new-fangled spectacles. By bringing Franklin to life, Isaacson shows how he helped to define both his own time and ours.

9.-“Seabiscuit: An American Legend,” by Laura Hillenbrand: The story of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

10.-“Under the Banner of Heaven,” by Jon Krakauer: Krakauer shifts his focus from extremes of physical adventure to extremes of religious belief within our own borders. At the core of his book is an appalling double murder committed by two Mormon Fundamentalist brothers, Ron and Dan Lafferty, who insist they received a revelation from God commanding them to kill their blameless victims.


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