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Top 10 Reads

Verbatim Booksellers in Vail Village

1. “Angels and Demons,” by Dan Brown: When symbolist Robert Langdon is summoned to a Swiss research facility to analyze a mysterious symbol seared into the chest of a murdered physicist, he discovers evidence of the unimaginable: the resurgence of an ancient secret brotherhood, which has surfaced to carry out the final phase of its legendary vendetta against its most hated enemy, the Catholic Church.

2. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink.



3 “A Girl Named Zippy,” by Haven Kimmel: When Haven Kimmel was born in 1965, Mooreland, Ind., was a sleepy little hamlet of 300 people. Nicknamed “Zippy” for the way she would bolt around the house, this small girl was possessed of big eyes and even bigger ears. In this witty and lovingly told memoir, Kimmel takes readers back to a time when small-town America was caught in the amber of the innocent postwar period – people helped their neighbors, went to church on Sunday and kept barnyard animals in their backyards. Haven Kimmel will be one of five featured authors at this week’s Festival of Words.

4. “Queens Fool,” by Philippa Gregory: Pursued by the Inquisition in 1553, Hannah Green, a 14-year-old Jewish girl, is forced to flee Spain with her father. Her gift of “Sight,” the ability to foresee the future, is priceless in the troubled times of the Tudor court. Hannah is adopted by the glamorous Robert Dudley, the charismatic son of King Edward’s protector, who brings her to court as a “holy fool” for Queen Mary and, ultimately, Queen Elizabeth. Hired as a fool but working as a spy; promised in wedlock but in love with her master; endangered by the laws against heresy, treason, and witchcraft, Hannah must choose between the safe life of a commoner and the dangerous intrigues of the royal family.



5. “Trump, How to Get Rich,” by Donald Trump: In Trump: How To Get Rich, Trump tells all – about the lessons learned from “The Apprentice,” his real estate empire, his position as head of the 20,000-member Trump Organization, and his most important role, as a father who has successfully taught his children the value of money and hard work.

6. “Against all Enemies,” by Richard Clarke: Richard Clarke served seven presidents and worked inside the White House for George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush until he resigned in March 2003, devoting two decades of his professional life to combating terrorism. From the moment the Bush team took office and decided to retain Clarke in his post as the counterterrorism czar, Clarke tried to persuade them to take al Qaeda seriously. For months, he was denied the opportunity even to make his case to Bush. Clarke was the nation’s crisis manager on 9/11, running the Situation Room – a scene described here for the first time — and then watched in dismay at what followed. Coming from a man known as one of the hard-liners against terrorists, Against All Enemies is both a powerful history of our two-decades-long confrontation with terrorism and a searing indictment of the current administration.

7. “Dante Club,” by Matthew Pearl: In 1865 Boston, the literary geniuses of the Dante Club – poets and Harvard professors Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell, along with publisher J. T. Fields – are finishing America’s first translation of The Divine Comedy and preparing to unveil Dante’s remarkable visions to the New World. The powerful Boston Brahmins at Harvard College are fighting to keep Dante in obscurity, believing that the infiltration of foreign superstitions into American minds will prove as corrupting as the immigrants arriving at Boston Harbor.



The members of the Dante Club fight to keep a sacred literary cause alive, but their plans fall apart when a series of murders erupts through Boston and Cambridge. Only this small group of scholars realizes that the gruesome killings are modeled on the descriptions of Hell’s punishments from Dante’s Inferno. With the lives of the Boston elite and Dante’s literary future in America at stake, the Dante Club members must find the killer before the authorities discover their secret.

8. “Digital Fortress,” by Dan Brown.

9. “Middlesex,” by Jeffrey Eugenidies: The story of Calliope and three generations of her Greek-American family, who relocated to Prohibition-era Detroit from Greece, witnessing the glory days of the Motor City, and the race riots of 1967, before moving to the tree-lined streets of suburban Grosse Pointe. Calliope uncovers a guilty family secret and the astonishing genetic history that turns Callie into Cal.

10. “Climb to Conquer,” by Peter Shelton: Few stories from the “greatest generation” are as unforgettable – or as little known – as that of the 10th Mountain Division. Today a versatile light infantry unit deployed around the world, the 10th began in 1941 as a crew of civilian athletes with a passion for mountains and snow. Currently featured as the Valley Read, adventure writer Peter Shelton follows the unique division from its conception on a Vermont ski hill, through training at Camp Hale near Leadville, through its dramatic World War II coming-of-age, to the ultimate revolution it inspired in American outdoor life. Shelton will be one of five featured author at this week’s Festival of Words.

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “Queen’s Fool,” by Phillipa Gregory: In this eagerly awaited sequel to “The Other Boleyn Girl,” Gregory returns to Tudor England, where the offspring of Henry VIII ascend to the throne amid treason, poisonous rivalries, accusations of heresy and unrequited love.

2. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Phillipa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.

3. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink.

4. “Climb to Conquer,” by Peter Shelton: Few stories are as unforgettable – or as little known – as that of the 10th Mountain Division. Today a versatile light infantry unit deployed around the world, the 10th began in 1941 as a crew of civilian athletes with a passion for mountains and snow. Featured as the 2004 Valley Read selection, adventure writer Peter Shelton follows the unique division from its conception on a Vermont ski hill, through training at Camp Hale near Leadville, through its dramatic World War II coming-of-age, to the ultimate revolution it inspired in American outdoor life. Shelton will be a featured author at April’s Festival of Words.

5. “1,000 Places to See Before You Die,” by Patricia Schultz: An around-the-world, continent-by-continent listing of places both on and off the beaten track. The prose is enticing, and after dishing out the romance of the places, Schultz delivers the nuts and bolts: Addresses, phone and fax numbers, Web sites, costs, best times to visit. Of special interest are subject-specific indexes: beaches, restaurants and more.

6. “Birth of Venus,” by Sarah Dunnant.

7. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd.

8. “Dante Club,” by Matthew Pearl.

9. “Angels and Demons,” by Dan Brown: When symbolist Robert Langdon is summoned to a Swiss research facility to analyze a mysterious symbol seared into the chest of a murdered physicist, he discovers evidence of the unimaginable: the resurgence of an ancient secret brotherhood which has surfaced to carry out the final phase of its legendary vendetta against its most hated enemy, the Catholic Church.

10. “Women of the Silk,” by Gail Tsukiyama: A rich portrait of one woman’s life in a China now lost. Her story is rendered with grace, with the clear dignity of legend or song. Tsukiyama lends her voice to figures of women emboldened by their dream of growth and personal power. Gail Tsukiyama will be at this year’s 2004 Festival of Words.


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