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Top 10 Reads

Daily Staff Report

The Bookworm of Edwards

1. “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: As Harry enters his fifth year at wizard school, it seems the bonds of friendship and trust have never been more sorely tested. Lord Voldemort’s rise has opened a rift in the wizarding world between those who believe the truth about his return, and those who prefer to believe it’s all madness and lies and just more trouble for Harry Potter.

2. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.



3. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cyptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

4. “Nanny Diaries,” by Emma Mclaughlin and Niclola Kraus: Struggling to graduate from New York University and afford her microscopic studio apartment, Nanny takes a job caring for the only son of the wealthy X family. She rapidly learns the insane amount of juggling involved in ensuring that a Park Avenue wife who doesn’t work, cook, clean or raise her own child has a smooth day.



5. “Thousand Days in Venice,” by Marlena Blasi: When Marlena de Blasi traveled to Italy, she expected to fall in love with the country, not to be swept away by a Venetian man. Filled with the foods and flavors of Italy, “A Thousand Days in Venice” is an enchanting story.

6. “Kate Remembered,” by A. Scott Berg: In 1983–at the age of seventy-five, Katherine Hepburn opened her door to biographer A. Scott Berg–then thirty-three–and began a special friendship, one that endured to the end of her illustrious life. Over the next twenty years, Kate used their many hours together to reveal all that came to mind, often reflecting on the people and episodes of her past, and occasionally on the meaning of life.

7. “The Other Boleyn Girl,” by Philippa Gregory: The daughters of a ruthlessly ambitious family, Mary and Anne Boleyn are sent to the court of Henry VIII to attract the attention of the king, who first takes Mary as his mistress and then Anne as his wife.



8. “Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

9. “Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: An in depth guide to the trails of Eagle County, from easy to difficult.

10. “Vail: Triumph of a Dream” by Pete Seibert: A colorful chronicle of Vail’s colorful history.

Verbatim Booksellers

1. “Fire and Ashes,” by John Maclean: In 2002, more than seven million acres were burned at a fire-fighting cost of over a billion dollars. Are wilderness fires now a tragic and enduring feature of the American landscape? John N. Maclean, author of the acclaimed “Fire on the Mountain, offers a view from the front lines, combining action-packed storytelling with moving insights about firefighters and informed analysis of firefighting strategy past and present.

2.-“Vail Hiker,” by Mary Ellen Gilliland: An in depth guide to the trails of Eagle County, from easy to difficult.

3.-“Vail: Triumph of a Dream” by Pete Seibert: A colorful chronicle of Vail’s colorful history.

4. “Da Vinci Code,” by Dan Brown: When a curator of the Louvre turns up murdered, his body surrounded by enigmatic ciphers written in invisible ink, code-breaker Robert Langdon and a French cyptologist are called in to unravel the clues to the killing. They discover the riddles are linked to the works of da Vinci and to a clandestine sect within the Catholic Church.

5. “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” by J.K. Rowling: As Harry enters his fifth year at wizard school, it seems the bonds of friendship and trust have never been more sorely tested. Lord Voldemort’s rise has opened a rift in the wizarding world between those who believe the truth about his return, and those who prefer to believe it’s all madness and lies and just more trouble for Harry Potter.

6. “Secret Life of Bees,” by Sue Monk Kidd: Lily Owens has shaped her life around one devastating, blurred, memory – the afternoon her mother was killed. Since then, her only real companion on the peach farm of her harsh, unyielding father has been a fierce-hearted black woman, Rosaleen. When Rosaleen insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily knows it is time to spring them both free.

7. “Short History of Nearly Everything,” by Bill Bryson: A book noted as a journey into the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer. It’s a dazzling quest, the intellectual odyssey of a lifetime, as this insatiably curious writer attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization.

8. “Fire on the Mountain,” by John Maclean: In 1994, a fire raged through Storm King Mountain in Colorado and killed 14 firefighters. MacLcean relates the events of the devastating fire and shows how it changed the practice of firefighting.

9.-“Life of Pi,” by Yann Martel: Pi Patel is the son of a zoo keeper. When Pi is 16, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger.

10.-“Virgin Blue,” by Tracy Chevalier: Never before published in the United States, this first novel is released by the critically acclaimed author of “Girl with a Pearl Earring” and “Falling Angels.” Readers meet Ella Turner and Isabelle du Moulin–two women born centuries apart, yet bound by a fateful family legacy.


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