Vail Daily letter: Frustration with cyclists | VailDaily.com

Vail Daily letter: Frustration with cyclists

Evette Curran
Vail, CO, Colorado

I am responding to Pavan Krueger’s letter stating “Why paths don’t work” in the July 29 Vail Daily.

I do not understand how cyclists can use the argument that they would rather go up against motor vehicles than non-motorized traffic that they incur on a recreation path.

I never want to tell anyone how they should go about training or getting exercise.

But come on. Why does my life have to be put at risk?

I would like to see that cyclists have to get a license to ride on the roads. Why should cyclist be treated any different from a person operating a vehicle? I would feel a lot more comfortable if cyclists had to go through the same processes that an individual has to go through to obtain a motor vehicle licenses.

Because they don’t have to do this now many cyclist totally disregard the Colorado bicycling laws that state that they must follow all rules just like a vehicle. These roads were designed for motor vehicles, not cyclists.

Recommended Stories For You

Due to new state law signed by Gov. Ritter, I have to give a cyclist a 3-foot-wide berth, which on most two-lane roads puts me directly into oncoming traffic.

So no, you don’t hear of an actual cyclist injuring a motor vehicle, but you do hear of car crashes due to this scenario. This valley is a wonderful playland full of many sporting adventures away from the roads. It makes me quite sad and annoyed at the same time to even see a jogger on the road instead of utilizing the many miles of recreational paths here in the valley that would provide better views and cleaner air.

Ms. Krueger states that a tax credit should be given to people who have vehicles but use their bike to commute to work.

How about taking that money and the money we would get by charging bicyclist for tags and a bicyclist license to constructing bike lanes on the roads?

If we truly want to share the roads designed for motor vehicles, then cyclists should share in the responsibility of making it safer for them and drivers.

Evette Curran