Vail Daily letter: Prayer does heal | VailDaily.com
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Vail Daily letter: Prayer does heal

Joel Belmont
Vail, CO, Colorado
newsroom@vaildaily.com

I was disturbed by the opinion piece “Paying for prayers a delusional alternative.” I understand the concept of opinion pieces. However, they should at least be factually correct.

Richard Carnes names people as Christian Scientists who are not, ascribing actions that are thus unrelated to a particular religion. And he claims to personally know somehow that relying on prayer for healing does not work, when it has been documented by medical physicians in thousands of cases over the past 100 years, and the number of healings in Christian Science number in the hundreds of thousands.

And I myself am living proof, as I have relied on Christian Science for the past 20-plus years to heal everything from common colds and strep throat, to a shifted spine (from a snowboarding accident), to broken toes (healed in three days!), to overcoming an accident where I should have been paralyzed.



I don’t mind if he expresses his opinion, but I would prefer he limit it to the things he actually, factually knows and has proof of in hand. Otherwise, it’s effectively publicizing slander, which provides your readers with nothing newsworthy, and worse, misinformation.

It is my hope that your publication strives to publish newsworthy and factual content.

Participate in The Longevity Project

The Longevity Project is an annual campaign to help educate readers about what it takes to live a long, fulfilling life in our valley. This year Kevin shares his story of hope and celebration of life with his presentation Cracked, Not Broken as we explore the critical and relevant topic of mental health.



The Christian Science Monitor, of which you might be aware (it’s an internationally acclaimed and Pulitzer-prize winning paper that’s been around for over a century) lists its intent as “to injure no man, but to bless all mankind.”

I find such a platform to be needed more in this age of a return to sensationalism-yellow journalism, and I hope to find future content in your paper that is more about blessing, less about injuring others, and based on fact, even if in the opinion section.

Joel Belmont



Glenwood Springs


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