Vail Symposium winter season begins Monday, Jan. 4, with right-to-die panel discussion | VailDaily.com
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Vail Symposium winter season begins Monday, Jan. 4, with right-to-die panel discussion

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Rep. Lois Court, D-Denver, is one of thee panelists who will present a balanced perspective on why death-with-dignity bills have failed in previous legislative decisions in Colorado and what will be changed as future legislation is reintroduced.
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If you go …

What: Right-to-Die Legislation in Colorado, presented by the Vail Symposium.

When: Monday, Jan. 4; 5:30 p.m. reception and 6 p.m. program.

Where: Donovan Pavilion, 1600 South Frontage Road W., Vail.

Cost: $25 online registration until 2 p.m. the day of the event, $35 at the door or $10 for students and teachers.

More information: Register at http://www.vailsymposium.org or by calling 970-476-0954.

VAIL — Legislation to allow physician-assisted death for patients diagnosed as terminally ill has been highly controversial nationwide. Colorado failed to join Oregon, Washington, Montana, New Mexico and Vermont in passing a right-to-die law when House Bill 1135 was voted down, 8-5, by the House Health and Human Services Committee in February 2015.

Now, as the subject is expected to be reintroduced in future legislative sessions, the Vail Symposium will host a conversation on the matter in Colorado specifically with three panelists. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. Monday with a reception at Donovan Pavilion in Vail, followed by the discussion at 6 p.m.

“It is important to remember that the Vail Symposium doesn’t side one way or another on controversial issues such as this,” said Dale Mosier, the Vail Symposium program committee chair. “It is our intention to bring well-rounded information and create an intelligent discussion on important topics. Right-to-die legislation is one of the most talked-about issues of today. We hope the audience can learn a great deal from our three speakers.”



Panelists include Rep. Lois Court, D-Denver, who was the sponsor of House Bill 1135 and has more than 20 years of experience as a public issues consultant; and Dr. Charles Hamlin, a retired surgeon from Denver who is a member of both the National and Colorado boards of compassion and choices. He studied pre-medicine at Yale, medicine at Dartmouth and Columbia and surgical training at Roosevelt Hospital in New York and Cornell Medical Center.

The third panelist is Carrie Ann Lucas, J.D., CWLS, co-leader of Not Dead Yet Colorado and a national board member of Not Dead Yet, a national grassroots disability rights organization. She is also founder and executive director of Disabled Parents Rights in Windsor. Lucas is an attorney who specializes in disability rights and representing disabled parents across Colorado and has been a recipient of an Equal Justice Works fellowship and a Petra Foundation fellowship. Lucas is also an advocate for children with disabilities and has adopted four older children who have disabilities.



Together, the three panelists will present a balanced perspective on why death-with-dignity bills have failed in previous legislative decisions and what will be changed as future legislation is reintroduced.

About the Symposium

In 1971, the Vail Symposium was conceived as an annual weekend think tank to formulate goals and ideals for the purpose of guiding future change in the nine-years-young mountain recreation community. Nearly 45 years later, the nonprofit Symposium continues stirring intellectual curiosity, fostering a forward-thinking attitude and providing education as stimulation to Vail and Vail’s visitors through thought-provoking, diverse and affordable programs.



For more information, visit http://www.vail symposium.org.


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