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Vail Valley news briefs

Daily Staff Report
Mindy Larson
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EDWARDS – Corey Baden, head of the Vail Christian School’s English Department, and Mindy Larson, head of the Science Department, were named Disney Teacher Award nominees for their creativity in the classroom. Disney each years honors teachers whose are seen as exemplifying creativity in teaching and inspiring students. A committee of educators from around the country will select the winners of the 2006 Disney Teacher Award Honorees. The awards will be announced in the spring.

The Senior Health Fair will be held Friday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Eagle County Health Services District Building in Edwards. People 60 and older can get dental, vision, hearing and posture exams, among other screenings. A state specialist in the new federal prescription plan will also be present to explain the Medicare Part D application.Lab profiles, including blood sugar, liver and kidney function tests, cholesterol and prostate exams are available this year from the Eagle County Health Service District.Participants may register to win either a bone density test, a mammogram or a blender. Transportation is available by calling 328-8840. For more information on the Senior Health Fair, call Cathy McRory at 926-5270 or Pat Nolan at 328-8840.

EDWARDS – The construction of Vail Christian High School’s academic building is on schedule and the facility should open for the 2006-2007 school year. Interior work has begun at the academic building while the foundation for the Fine Arts and Athletic Center has been poured. Construction of the latter building will not begin until more funds are raised.The Wheeler Family Foundation has offered a grant of $1 million which will be given to the school if it is matched by $2 million in new funds by April 30. The development committee – leg by Stacy Mengedoth – will be working feverishly to accomplish that goal. Tours of the academic building will begin in early spring. For more information, call Eileen Jacobs at 471-3117.



GYPSUM – Eagle Valley High School senior Zach Henry has been named a finalist in the National Merit Scholarship Program for 2006.Less than 1 percent of all high school seniors in the nation qualifies as a finalist in the program. Finalists are eligible for a variety of scholarships. Zach is the son of Kathy and George Henry of Eagle. His younger sister, Hilary, is a sophomore Eagle Valley High School.”I found out a few weeks ago through our (school) counselors,” said Henry, who is planning on attending a college out of state. His interests are engineering and computers, he says. “Zach is a student that kept me on my toes in Calculus,” said math teacher Cliff Zehring. He said Zach showed him how to solve some problems during his class. “Zach’s a hard-working and deserving student of this award,” says Zehring.

The Roaring Fork Chapter of the Sierra Club is urging its members and others concerned about the White River National Forest to adopt a roadless area a first step to saving areas the club says may lose protection if people dont speak out. The Adopt a Roadless Area campaign is part of environmentalists efforts to sway Colorados Roadless Areas Task Force toward recommending that Gov. Bill Owens encourage the federal government to grant full protection for roadless areas in Colorados national forests. The state Legislature created the task force after the U.S. Department of Agriculture last year rescinded a Bill Clinton-era rule that required the U.S. Forest Service to protect more than 58 million acres that were deemed roadless. A new Bush administration rule leaves it up to states to recommend whether the Forest Service should open roadless areas to development. When Sierra Club members met at WestStar Bank in Glenwood Springs on Thursday night to discuss the White River National Forests roadless areas, Carbondale-based Wilderness Workshop director Sloan Shoemaker cautioned the clubs members that roadless doesnt mean wilderness. Whereas congressionally-designated wilderness areas like the Flat Tops or Maroon Bells-Snowmass wilderness areas prohibit mechanized vehicles of any sort, most roadless areas are wide open to motorized vehicles. Roadless areas are often criss-crossed with all-terrain vehicle trails, Shoemaker said. Roadless areas are only those areas within national forests that do not contain an official Forest Service road, he said. Roadless areas are not wilderness-light, he said, adding that roadless areas are often managed more liberally than wilderness. Leslie Cook, an employee of Anderson Camps near Dotsero, a camp owned by the husband of Post Independent publisher Andrea Porter, is spearheading the Adopt a Roadless Area project. She said she believes roadless areas should remain open to hiking, biking, snowmobiling and ATV use, but roads should not be developed there. She said people need to show the task force that they care about roadless areas and dont want them developed. Others at the meeting shared that sentiment. Its important to me because the government just seems to be taking over all the lands that people want to have for their own use, said Maggie Pedersen, of Glenwood Springs. Theyre trying to be able to use it for (mineral) extraction, and I think that we have to draw a line somewhere.Vail, Colorado


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