Walking Mountains, local hunters explore the Science Behind Hunting, Sept. 7 | VailDaily.com

Walking Mountains, local hunters explore the Science Behind Hunting, Sept. 7

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Modern hunting measures sustain healthy game populations while providing opportunities for hunters to appreciate their ancient role in our environment.

AVON — The sport, or way of life, of hunting is ancient and tied intricately to reverence for the land. Our ancestors were hunters. To them, animals were as sacred as life itself because a successful hunt assured survival. Back then, hunters and the game they sought were inseparable; human existence and hunting were one.

Today, few of us hunt to survive. The modern hunters' role now is to ensure the perseverance of wildlife and to abide by established ethical standards to preserve the challenge of the hunt. The license fees and taxes hunters pay contribute to a significant portion of the nation's conservation funding — from habitat restoration to research.

Hunters in Colorado are required to complete an approved hunter-education course before applying for a hunting license. These modern measures sustain healthy game populations while providing opportunities for hunters to appreciate their ancient role in our environment.

Workshop on Wednesday

Whether you’re a novice or an expert, this interactive workshop aims to inspire respect for wildlife and the skills it takes to thrive in the wilderness while hunting.

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Walking Mountains Science Center and longtime local hunters John Byron and Duke Gerber will discuss and explore the Science Behind Hunting on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Whether you're a novice or an expert, this interactive workshop aims to inspire respect for wildlife and the skills it takes to thrive in the wilderness while hunting.

Byron, local hunter and longtime guide, will walk participants through hunting and land ethics, understanding wildlife behavior and how it relates to licenses issued, and discuss survival skills and topography in a wilderness setting. His years of experience hunting in Eagle County are an invaluable resource to our community, so bring your tough questions.

Gerber, avid hunter and outdoorsman with more than 40 years of experience in the Eagle Valley, will interpret the hunter's process after an animal has been killed. Having the skills to properly field dress and clean game assures that game is never wasted. Efficiently butchering and processing the meat are additional steps to fully enjoying and respecting the life of the animal. Duke will also walk attendees though his hide-tanning technique to bring the entire operation full circle.

Made possible by Vail Honeywagon, Walking Mountains' Science Behind Series offers opportunities for adults to apply new knowledge and skills to everyday life. For more information and to register, visit http://www.walking mountains.org/sb

If you go …

What: Science Behind Hunting.

When: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7.

Where: Walking Mountains Science Center, 318 Walking Mountains Lane, Avon.

Cost: Free, $5 donation suggested.

More information: Reservations are required. Visit http://www.walkingmountains.org/sb.